Kosteniuk Versus Koneru: Learning The Bishop’s Opening Truth

In the sixth round of the Monaco Grand Prix for inferior players of the opposite sex today the prettiest female player currently playing, Alexandra Kosteniuk,

played “The Truth” (https://xpertchesslessons.wordpress.com/2019/09/22/jeffery-xiong-teaches-the-truth/

https://xpertchesslessons.wordpress.com/2019/09/12/jennifer-yu-learns-the-truth/

https://xpertchesslessons.wordpress.com/2019/07/06/the-truth-at-the-ironman-chess-club/) against Humpy Koneru.

Kosteniuk is rated 2495; Koneru 2560. Both players are clearly at least one category below male Grandmasters, and two categories below what are now called “Super Grandmasters.” Yet because they were born female they are battling for big, in Chess terms, money. That is money that should be going to the best players regardless of sexual orientation. Because of rating we know how inferior are women at Chess when compared to men. This begs the question of why women, with only very limited exceptions, such as Hou Yifan,

are inferior to men players.

Kosteniuk (2495) vs Koneru (2560)

FIDE Women’s Grand Prix – Monaco 2019 round 06

1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 Nf6 3. d3 c6 4. Nf3 Be7

(4…d5 is the best move according to both Stockfish and Komodo. The game move is second best. The Stocky shown at the ChessBomb has 4…d5 best, followed by 4…Qc7 and 4…d6) 5 Nc3

(Like Be7, 5 Nc3 is a light blue move. 5 0-0 is the best move) 5…d6 (Komodo 13.2 64-bit @depth 38 at the CBDB likes this move, but going to depth 41 changes it’s whatever and prefers 5…0-0) 6 d4?

(I will admit to being stunned upon seeing this move. It is clearly inferior and I do not need a machine to know this fact. The Stockfish program running at the Bomb shows this move forfeits whatever advantage white had with the first move of the game. Could this have really been Kosteniuk’s opening preparation or was she simply “winging it”? 6 0-0 has been the most often played move but Komodo shows the best move being 6 a4) 6…0-0?

(This is unfathomable. 6…exd4 is the only move. The move played by Humpy is not even shown at the CBDB or 365Chess. There is a reason…)

There is no longer any reason to continue this exercise in futility. It is more than a little obvious one of the reasons women are inferior to men at Chess is their extremely weak opening play. Why women are so weak playing the opening is open to conjecture, but there it is for anyone to see. This game is, unfortunately, not an anomaly.

Alexandra Kosteniuk (2495) – Humpy Koneru (2560)

FIDE Women’s Grand Prix – Monaco 2019 round 06

1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 Nf6 3. d3 c6 4. Nf3 Be7 5. Nc3 d6 6. d4 O-O 7. O-O Na6 8. a4 exd4 9. Nxd4 Nb4 10. Re1 Re8 11. Bg5 h6 12. Bh4 d5 13. exd5 Nfxd5 14. Bxe7 Rxe7 15. Rxe7 Qxe7 16. Nxd5 Nxd5 17. Bxd5 cxd5 18. Qe1 Qe4 19. Qd2 Bd7 20. Re1 Qg6 21. b3 Qd6 22. h3 Rc8 23. Re3 a6 24. Rd3 Qc7 25. c3 Qb6 26. Qf4 Re8 27. Re3 Rxe3 28. Qxe3 Qd6 29. Ne2 a5 30. Qd4 Qg6 31. Kh2 Qe4 32. Qd2 b5 33. axb5 Bxb5 34. Nd4 Bd7 35. Qd1 Qe5+ 36. Kg1 Qc7 37. Qf3 Qe5 38. Qd1 Qc7 39. Qd3 Qe5 40. Qd1 Qc7 ½-½

When it comes to playing Chess it is obvious the top women players are exponentially worse than the top men players, yet women play in separate tournaments with large prize funds because…I have no idea why there are separate tournaments for female players. There should be no tournaments for women only because women should play in OPEN tournaments which are OPEN TO ALL! In that event women would have to elevate their game or battle in the lower sections for a much smaller prize fund. There is not, and has never been, enough prize money in Chess to support inferior players playing for large sums of money which should go to better, and more deserving, Chess players!

BlunderFest Chess

The game in the last post was played in the third round of the ongoing Russian Women’s Championship Superfinal 2019. Former World Women’s champion Alexandra Kosteniuk

had the white pieces versus Margarita Potapova.


The game was chosen because when beginning to play Chess I played the Najdorf because Bobby Fischer played the Najdorf, and although I stopped playing the Najdorf decades ago I still play over many Najdorf games, and because I met Alexandra Kosteniuk at the World Open over a decade ago. She was sitting alone I said, “You are even prettier in person than in pictures. She smiled and sorta blushed. I asked her to sign her book,

telling her it was a surprise gift for a lady. She said, “Please, sit.” I did and greatly enjoyed our conversation. Upon reflection it was the highlight of the time spent at the event.

This is a terrible game. It looks more like a game brought to me for review by two girls playing in one of the lower sections of a tournament at the House of Pain than a game played by a former World Champion of Women. Unfortunately, it is indicative of the state of modern Chess. Pathetic games like this are foisted upon we the fans of the Royal game every day. The sad fact is that when the best players have little, or no time to cogitate the quality of the moves played deteriorate exponentially. When that happens Chess becomes uninteresting.

The game is replete with “Red Moves,” some of which are laughable, at the ChessBomb. The game can be found here:

https://www.chessbomb.com/arena/2019-russian-womens-championship-superfinal/03-Kosteniuk_Alexandra-Potapova_Margarita

“Chess – to the non-FIDE world – is and has always been a thoughtful, deliberate and difficult game. Chess represents our best intellectual qualities.
How far FIDE goes in the other direction, with its politics of dumbing down the game (faster time controls) or trying to make chess a child’s game by actively campaigning for its inclusion into schools, will not change the world’s perception of chess.
The only thing that will change is the world’s perception of FIDE.” – GM Kevin Spraggett

Chess, sex, porn & other misperceptions

When Should One Resign?

“The late resignation is, arguably, an even greater scourge. Early in our careers we are taught that it is impolite to play on in completely lost positions. Most people grasp the concept well enough, although obviously weaker players tend to be slower in appreciating their abject plight. The key point here though is the hopelessness: there is nothing reprehensible at all in continuing a bad or even lost position if the tiniest glimmer of light still flickers. Chess is a fight, after all. But when that hope is extinguished,, and nothing but irksome drudgery remains, the decent thing to do is resign and not waste everyone’s time. Do not, under any circumstances, sit there for ages, as Hikaru Nakamura did against Fabiano Caruana

earlier this year, petulantly wallowing in self-pity and not moving. That is ungentlemanly.” – Nigel Short New In Chess magazine 2017/8

Nakamura

seems to have earned the opprobrium of his peers during the course of his career. Consider this exchange in an interview of Levon Aronian

by Mark Grigoryan:

“In one of your interviews you said that: “When you play against a normal person, a normal chess player, then during the game you have normal relations. But if your opponent tries to unsettle you, behaves “unsportingly”, then naturally that creates a certain “baggage” that has an impact.” What kind of tricks have been used against you?

It’s happened many times. One Israeli player (not a leading one) drank tea during the game and squeezed a teabag with his fingers, then made his moves (laughs). During the game Alexander Grischuk,

who was nearby, came up to me and said: “Levon, it seems you’ll win the game, but will you be able to come up with something so you don’t have to shake his hand?”

It varies. Even when playing against top players it happens that they try to take back a move. For example, Nakamura and Carlsen. In both cases I called an arbiter. They continued to deny it, but the arbiters confirmed what I said. They also knew that there were devices recording it on video and, ultimately, they admitted I was right.”

https://chess24.com/en/read/news/levon-aronian-we-should-be-like-wolves

“Then, a disaster. Nakamura reached out his hand and gripped his king. Suddenly, his hand trembled and he yanked it backwards.”

America’s #2 Chess Player Just Messed Up Big-Time

“He touched the king! He touched the king!” Gasped the official commentators, grandmasters Evgeny Miroshnichenko and Alexandra Kosteniuk.

“He needs to move it!”

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/zach-young/americas-2-chess-player-m_b_9491644.html

The World Human Chess Champion has also been afflicted with the malady:

http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1487930

Magnus Carlsen loses by touch move rule || Chess Clip # 110

Top chess players (Carlsen, Nakamura.) made terrible touch move mistakes (part 1)

The Stoltz Variation

One of the games at the 90th Hastings Congress began 1 e4 c5 2 Bc4 e6 3 Qe2. Naturally, this caught my eye. Regular readers know of my fondness for the Bishop’s opening, and also for the Chigorin variation against the French, or any opening containing the move Qe2. How could I not pay attention when both moves are played in the same opening? The game was between David Sedgwick (1995) and Ali R Jaunooby (2175), and was played in the eight round. The latter played 3…Nc6. I considered only 4 Nf3 or 4 c3, but Sedgwick played 4 d3, which I did not understand. A quick consultation with the Chessbase database (http://database.chessbase.com/js/apps/database/) shows only those two moves having been played, so 4 d3 must be a TN. The game continued: 4…b5 5.Bb3 Nd4 6.Qd1 d5 7.c4 bxc4 8.Ba4+ Bd7 9.Bxd7+ Qxd7 10.Nf3 cxd3 11.Qxd3 Nf6 12.e5 Nxf3+ 13.Qxf3 Ne4 14.Nd2 f5 15.Nxe4 fxe4 16.Qg3 Qb5 17.a4 Qa6 18.Bg5 Rb8 19.Qc3 h6 20.Bd2 Be7 21.Qg3 Kf7 22.Qf4+ Kg8 23.b4 Bg5 24.Qg3 Bxd2+ 25.Kxd2 Rxb4 26.Rhb1 Rd4+ 27.Ke1 Kh7 28.Rb5 Rf8 29.Rab1 Rf7 30.h4 h5 31.Qg5 Rf5 32.Qe7 e3 33.fxe3 Rxa4 34.Qxc5 Rxh4 35.Qc2 Re4 36.R1b3 Qa1+ 37.Qb1 Qxe5 38.Qc1 Qg3+ 0-1

Because of my experience playing 2 Qe2 versus the French I would never play a move like 4 d3, allowing the Knight to come to d4, attacking the Queen, so I checked out 4 Nf3 on the CBDB, learning that both Komodo and Stockfish play the Knight move. After 4 Nf3 both Komodo 8 and Houdini 4×64 play 4…Nf6, which would be a TN, as the CBDB contains no games with the move. It does show that Komodo 6 plays 4…Nge7, which is a move that has been previously played. Finding no games at the CBDB, I surfed on over to 365Chess (http://www.365chess.com/opening.php?m=9&n=75620&ms=e4.c5.Bc4.e6.Qe2.Nc6.Nf3.Nf6&ns=3.3.195.572.2485.4268.4065.75620) finding two games with 4…Nf6, so we do have a “main line.” Both games were played last century, back in 1972, the year I met Bobby Fischer at the Church’s Fried Chicken tournament in San Antonio after Bobby bested Boris, winning the World Chess Championship.

Slavoj Kupka (2375) vs Josef Pribyl (2435)
CSR-ch 1972

1. e4 c5 2. Bc4 e6 3. Qe2 Nc6 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. d3 Be7 6. Bb3 O-O 7. c3 e5 8. O-O d6 9. Rd1 Qc7 10. Bg5 h6 11. Bh4 Be6 12. Nbd2 Rad8 13. Nc4 Nh5 14. Bg3 Nxg3 15. hxg3 Rfe8 16. Ne3 Bxb3 17. axb3 Bf8 18. g4 f6 19. g3 Qf7 20. Nd2 a5 21. Ndc4 Ra8 22. Nb6 Ra6 23. Ned5 Be7 24. Kg2 Bd8 25. Nc4 Qe6 26. Rh1 Rf8 27. Nce3 Rf7 28. Nf5 Kf8 29. Qd2 Ke8 30. b4 cxb4 31. cxb4 axb4 32. Qc2 Rxa1 33. Rxa1 Rd7 34. Ra8 Kf7 35. Qa4 Be7 36. Rc8 Bd8 37. Ra8 Kg6 38. Nfe3 Kh7 39. Nxb4 Bb6 40. Nc4 Bd4 1/2-1/2

Jiri Malis (2220) vs Ivan Jankovec (2320)
CSR-ch 1972

1. e4 c5 2. Bc4 e6 3. Qe2 Nc6 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. d3 Be7 6. Bb3 d5 7. Nbd2 O-O 8. c3 dxe4 9. dxe4 Qc7 10. O-O b6 11. e5 Nd7 12. Re1 Bb7 13. h4 Rfe8 14. h5 Bf8 15. Nf1 g6 16. Bc2 Bg7 17. Bf4 Ne7 18. Rad1 Rad8 19. N1h2 a6 20. Bg5 b5 21. h6 Bh8 22. Ng4 Nb6 23. Bf6 Rxd1 24. Rxd1 Ned5 25. Bxh8 Kxh8 26. Qd2 Qe7 27. Be4 Nc4 28. Qc2 Rd8 29. b3 Ncb6 30. c4 Nb4 31. Rxd8+ Qxd8 32. Qe2 Bxe4 33. Qxe4 Qc7 34. Ng5 Nxa2 35. Qf3 Qe7 36. Qf6+ 1-0

Further research shows this is not the first time Mr. Sedgwick has played this opening, having had the temerity to play this way against a future World Champion of Women.

David Sedgwick (2095 ) vs Alex Longson (2135)
7th Monarch Assurance 1998

1. e4 c5 2. Bc4 e6 3. Qe2 Be7 4. d3 d5 5. Bb3 Nc6 6. c3 Nf6 7. Bg5 O-O 8. Nd2
b5 9. f4 a5 10. Ngf3 a4 11. Bc2 d4 12. O-O a3 13. bxa3 dxc3 14. Nb3 Nd4 15.
Nbxd4 cxd4 16. e5 Nd5 17. Bxe7 Qxe7 18. Nxd4 Qc5 19. Qf2 Rxa3 20. Bb3 Ne7 21.
Nc2 Qxf2+ 22. Rxf2 Ra8 23. Nb4 Rd8 24. Rd1 Bb7 25. g4 g6 26. d4 Bd5 27. Rc2
Bxb3 28. axb3 Rac8 29. Kf2 Nd5 30. Nxd5 Rxd5 31. b4 Rc4 32. Ke3 Rxb4 33. Rxc3
Ra4 34. Rc8+ Kg7 35. Rc7 Ra8 36. f5 gxf5 37. gxf5 exf5 38. Kf4 Rad8 39. Rg1+
Kf8 40. Kg5 Rxd4 41. Kf6 R4d7 42. Rgc1 Rxc7 43. Rxc7 Kg8 44. Rb7 Re8 45. Rxb5
Re6+ 46. Kxf5 Rh6 47. Rb2 Rg6 48. h4 Rg1 49. h5 Kg7 50. Rf2 h6 51. Ke4 Ra1 52.
Kf5 1/2-1/2

David Sedgwick (2091) vs Alexandra Kosteniuk (2398)
9th Monarch Assurance 2000

1. e4 c5 2. Bc4 e6 3. Qe2 Nc6 4. c3 Be7 5. d3 d5 6. Bb3 Nf6 7. Bg5 O-O 8. Nf3
b6 9. e5 Nd7 10. Bxe7 Qxe7 11. d4 a5 12. Nbd2 Ba6 13. Qe3 cxd4 14. cxd4 Nb4 15.
O-O-O a4 16. Bc2 Rfc8 17. Ne1 Bd3 18. Nxd3 Nxc2 19. Qg3 Na3+ 20. Nc5 Nb5 21.
Qd3 Na7 22. b4 axb3 23. Ndxb3 bxc5 0-1

These were the oldest games found:

Goesta Stoltz vs Jan Foltys
Karlovy Vary 1948

1. e4 c5 2. Bc4 e6 3. Qe2 Nc6 4. c3 Be7 5. d3 d5 6. Bb3 Nf6 7. Nf3 dxe4 8. dxe4
O-O 9. e5 Nd5 10. Bc2 Qc7 11. h4 f5 12. exf6 Nxf6 13. Nbd2 e5 14. Ng5 g6 15. h5
Nxh5 16. Nxh7 Nf4 17. Bb3+ Kg7 18. Ne4 Rh8 19. Bxf4 exf4 20. O-O-O Bf5 21. Neg5
Ne5 22. Bc2 Bxg5 23. Nxg5 Kf6 24. Ne4+ Kg7 25. Rxh8 Rxh8 26. Nd6 Kf6 27. Bxf5
gxf5 28. Rd5 Qe7 29. Kc2 Rh2 30. Qd2 Rh4 31. Rxc5 f3 32. gxf3 Qd7 33. b3 Nxf3
34. Ne4+ Ke7 35. Qxd7+ Kxd7 36. Nd2 Rf4 37. Kd1 Nxd2 38. Rd5+ Kc6 39. Rxd2 Rf3
40. c4 a5 41. Ke2 Rc3 42. Kd1 Rf3 43. Rc2 a4 44. b4 Rd3+ 45. Ke2 Ra3 46. Kf1
Rd3 47. Kg2 b5 48. Kf1 bxc4 49. Rxc4+ Kb5 50. Rf4 Ra3 51. Rxf5+ Kxb4 52. Rf4+
Kc5 53. Rf5+ Kc4 54. Rf4+ Kd5 55. Ke1 Rxa2 56. Kd1 a3 1/2-1/2

Goesta Stoltz vs Gedeon Barcza
Karlovy Vary 1948

1. e4 c5 2. Bc4 e6 3. Qe2 a6 4. c3 Nc6 5. Nf3 Nge7 6. d4 cxd4 7. cxd4 d5 8. Bb3
dxe4 9. Qxe4 Na5 10. Bc2 Qd5 11. Qe2 Qc4 12. Qd1 Nd5 13. a3 Bd7 14. Ne5 Qc7 15.
Nxd7 Qxd7 16. O-O Rc8 17. Nd2 Qc7 18. Be4 Nf6 19. Bf3 Be7 20. b4 Nc6 21. Bb2
O-O 22. Rc1 Qd7 23. Nc4 Rcd8 24. Qb3 Nd5 25. g3 Bf6 26. Rfd1 Nce7 27. Ne5 Bxe5
28. dxe5 Rc8 29. Be4 Rxc1 30. Rxc1 Rc8 31. Rd1 Qb5 32. Bd4 g6 33. Bd3 Qc6 34.
Bc5 Qc7 35. Qb2 Qd7 36. Be4 Qa4 37. Re1 b6 38. Bd4 a5 39. bxa5 bxa5 40. Bd3 Nc6
41. Be3 Rb8 42. Qa1 Nxe3 43. Rxe3 Ne7 44. Be4 Rd8 45. Qc3 Rd1+ 46. Kg2 Nd5 47.
Bxd5 Rxd5 48. Qc7 Rd7 49. Qb6 Kg7 50. h4 h5 51. Qc5 Rb7 52. Kh2 Qd1 53. Qd6
Qxd6 54. exd6 Kf6 55. f4 1-0

I propose this opening be named the “Stoltz variation.”

Ilia Smirin (2664) vs Vitezslav Rasik (2436)
CZE-chT 2003

1. e4 c5 2. Bc4 e6 3. Qe2 Nc6 4. c3 Be7 5. Bb3 d5 6. d3 Nf6 7. Nf3 O-O 8. O-O
b5 9. Bg5 c4 10. dxc4 bxc4 11. Ba4 dxe4 12. Bxc6 exf3 13. Bxf3 Rb8 14. Bf4 Rb5
15. b4 Nd5 16. Bg3 Bf6 17. a4 Rxb4 18. cxb4 Bxa1 19. Qxc4 Bb7 20. Na3 Bc3 21.
Rd1 Bxb4 22. Rxd5 Bxd5 23. Qxb4 a5 24. Qd6 Qxd6 25. Bxd6 Rc8 26. Kf1 Bb3 27.
Ke2 Bxa4 28. Ke3 Bc6 29. Bxc6 Rxc6 30. Be7 f6 31. Kd4 Rc1 32. h4 Rf1 33. Ke3
Rd1 34. Nc4 a4 35. Nb2 Ra1 36. Nc4 Rb1 37. Kd3 Kf7 38. Ba3 Kg6 39. Bb2 Rxb2 0-1

Slavko Cicak (2497) vs Bengt Lindberg (2420)
35th Rilton Cup 2006

1. e4 c5 2. Bc4 e6 3. Qe2 Nc6 4. Nf3 d6 5. c3 Nf6 6. Bb3 Be7 7. O-O O-O 8. d4
cxd4 9. cxd4 e5 10. dxe5 dxe5 11. Rd1 Qb6 12. h3 Bc5 13. Bg5 Nd4 14. Nxd4 Bxd4
15. Nd2 Be6 16. Bxf6 gxf6 17. Nf3 Bxb3 18. axb3 Rad8 19. Nxd4 Rxd4 20. Rxd4
exd4 21. Rd1 Rd8 22. Rd3 Qc6 23. Qd2 Qxe4 24. Rg3+ Kf8 25. Qb4+ Ke8 26. Re3 1-0

Up Against the Berlin Wall

In Chess Informant 118 Garry Kasparov writes, “The sharp character of these games shows the Berlin is indeed a rich and subtle middlegame, and not an endgame. And if White pushes too hard, the absence of queens from the board does not offer him any safety.” (http://www.chess.com/article/view/kasparov-on-berlin-defense)

In a recent article on the Chessbase website, “Kasparov: The quality of the games was not so high,” Garry wrote, “On a personal note, I find it ironic that 14 years after I was criticized for not beating Vladimir Kramnik’s Berlin Defense, when I lost my title in London, the Berlin has become an absolute standard at the highest level. Amateurs may find it boring, but it is really not an endgame at all, but a complex queenless middlegame that can be very sharp, as we saw in the final Carlsen-Anand game.” (http://en.chessbase.com/post/kasparov-the-quality-of-the-games-was-not-so-high)

As an amateur, I concur with Garry. The Berlin, with its concomitant early Queen exchange, is boring. The elite players play a different game from that played by the hoi poi. The commentators know this and go overboard in trying to inject some “excitement” into the Berlin for the fans, or at least the ones still awake.

The Legendary Georgia Ironman has for decades told students that an early Queen trade usually, in general terms, favors Black. Understood is the fact that, sans Queen, Black will not be checkmated early in the game. It goes without saying that the Berlin, as Tim has been heard to say, “Fits my style.” Why then give Black what he wants by trading Queens?

There are many ways of battling the Berlin without trading Queens. The Great man, Emanuel Lasker, showed the way in an 1892 match played in the USA:

Emanuel Lasker vs Jackson Whipps Showalter

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. Qe2 Bc5 5. Bxc6 bxc6 6. Nxe5 O-O 7. c3 a5 8. d4 Ba6 9. Qf3 Re8 10. Bg5 Be7 11. Nd2 Rb8 12. b3 Qc8 13. c4 Bd8 14. O-O c5 15. Qh3 Re6 16. Nef3 Nxe4 17. Nxe4 Rxe4 18. Bxd8 Qxd8 19. Qf5 Qe7 20. Rae1 Re6 21. d5 g6 22. Qf4 Qd6 23. Qxd6 Rxd6 24. Ng5 a4 25. Ne4 axb3 26. axb3 Rxb3 27. Nxd6 cxd6 28. Rc1 Rb4 29. Rb1 Bxc4 30. Rxb4 cxb4 31. Rd1 Ba2 32. Rd2 b3 33. Rb2 Kg7 34. f4 Kf6 35. Kf2 g5 36. Kf3 h6 37. Ke4 Kg6 38. f5+ Kf6 39. g4 Ke7 40. Kd4 Kf6 41. Ke4 Ke7 42. Kd3 Kf6 43. Kd4 Kg7 44. Kc3 h5 45. gxh5 Kh6 46. Re2 b2 47. Rxb2 Bxd5 48. Rd2 Be4 49. Rxd6+ Kxh5 50. f6 Bf5 51. Kd4 Be6 52. Ke5 g4 53. Rd3 Kg6 54. Rd2 Kg5 55. Rf2 Kg6 56. Kd6 Kg5 57. Ke7 Kh5 58. Re2 Kg6 59. Re5 Bb3 60. Rb5 Be6 61. Rb6 Bc4 62. Rb8 Be6 63. Rh8 Kg5 64. Rh7 d5 65. Rxf7 Bxf7 66. Kxf7 d4 67. Kg7 d3 68. f7 1-0

4 Qe2 versus the Berlin should be called the “Lasker variation” against the Berlin. Here is another game with the Lasker variation in which a player well-known for playing Qe2 against the French tried it versus the Berlin:

Mikhail Chigorin vs Siegbert Tarrasch
Budapest 1896

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. Qe2 d6 5. d4 exd4 6. e5 d3 7. cxd3 dxe5 8.
Nxe5 Bb4+ 9. Bd2 O-O 10. Bxc6 Bxd2+ 11. Nxd2 bxc6 12. Nxc6 Qd6 13. Ne7+ Kh8 14.
Nxc8 Raxc8 15. O-O Rfd8 16. Ne4 Qxd3 17. Qxd3 Rxd3 18. Nxf6 gxf6 19. Rfd1 Rcd8
20. Rxd3 Rxd3 21. g3 Rd2 22. Rc1 Rxb2 23. Rxc7 Rxa2 24. Rxf7 Ra6 25. Kg2 Kg8
26. Rb7 Ra2 27. h4 a6 28. Kf3 h5 29. Rc7 Ra5 30. Kf4 Kf8 31. f3 Kg8 32. Ra7 Kf8
33. g4 hxg4 34. fxg4 Ra1 35. Kf5 Rf1+ 36. Kg6 Rf4 37. g5 fxg5 38. hxg5 Ra4 39.
Ra8+ Ke7 40. Kh6 a5 41. g6 Ra1 42. g7 Rh1+ 43. Kg6 Rg1+ 44. Kh7 Rh1+ 45. Kg8
Ra1 46. Ra7+ Ke8 47. Ra6 Rh1 48. Rxa5 Re1 49. Rh5 Rg1 50. Re5+ Kd7 51. Kh7 1-0

A few more games in chronological order:

Mikhail Tal vs Viktor Korchnoi
Candidates SF, Moscow, 1968

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. Qe2 a6 5. Ba4 Be7 6. O-O b5 7. Bb3 O-O 8. a4 b4 9. d3 d6 10. Nbd2 Bg4 11. Qe3 Na5 12. Ba2 c5 13. Nc4 Nc6 14. h3 Bd7 15. Qe2 Rb8 16. Bb3 Ne8 17. Ne3 Na5 18. Bd5 Nc7 19. Bd2 Nxd5 20. Nxd5 Be6 21. Nxe7+ Qxe7 22. Ng5 f6 23. Nxe6 Qxe6 24. f4 Nc6 25. Be3 Nd4 26. Bxd4 cxd4 27. b3 Rbc8 28. Rad1 Rc5 29. Rd2 Rfc8 30. Rf2 a5 31. Qf3 exf4 32. Qxf4 Re5 33. Rfe2 Qe7 34. Qf2 Qa7 35. Kh1 Rce8 36. Kg1 Qc5 37. Qf3 R8e7 38. Kh1 h6 39. Kg1 Re8 40. Kh1 R8e7 41. Kg1 Kf8 42. Rd1 d5 43. Rde1 Kf7 44. h4 dxe4 45. Rxe4 h5 46. Qf4 Rxe4 1/2-1/2

Anatoly Karpov vs Art Bisguier
Caracas 1970

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. Qe2 Be7 5. c3 d6 6. d4 Nd7 7. O-O O-O 8. Nbd2 Bf6 9. d5 Ne7 10. Bd3 c6 11. c4 a5 12. b3 g6 13. Ba3 c5 14. Bb2 Bg7 15. g3 Kh8 16. Rae1 Nf6 17. Nh4 Nfg8 18. Ng2 a4 19. f4 f6 20. Ne3 Nh6 21. Bc3 axb3 22. axb3 Bh3 23. Rf2 Bd7 24. Qf1 Nf7 25. f5 g5 26. Be2 Ng8 27. h4 gxh4 28. gxh4 Bh6 29. Bh5 Qe7 30. Kh1 Bf4 31. Qh3 b5 32. cxb5 Bxb5 33. Ndc4 Bxe3 34. Nxe3 Ra3 35. Bd1 Ngh6 36. Bb2 Ra2 37. Bh5 Rg8 38. Nd1 Raa8 39. Nc3 Bd7 40. Bc1 Rab8 41. Bd1 Ra8 42. Ne2 Ra2 43. Rg1 Rxg1+ 44. Kxg1 Bb5 45. Nc3 Rxf2 46. Kxf2 Ba6 47. Nb1 Qb7 48. Qc3 Ng8 49. Bh5 Ngh6 50. Nd2 Ng8 51. Ke1 Ngh6 52. Kd1 Bb5 53. Nf3 Qa6 54. Ng5 Be8 55. Be2 Bb5 56. Bh5 Be8 57. Nf3 Bb5 58. Ne1 Qa2 59. Qb2 Qa5 60. Bd2 Qa7 61. Qc3 Qa2 62. Nc2 c4 63. bxc4 Bxc4 64. Qa3 Qb1+ 65. Qc1 Qb3 66. Bxh6 Qd3+ 67. Bd2 Qxe4 68. Qa3 Bxd5 69. Ne3 Qxh4 70. Bxf7 Bxf7 71. Qxd6 Qa4+ 72. Ke1 Qh4+ 73. Kd1 Qa4+ 74. Kc1 Qa1+ 75. Kc2 Qa4+ 76. Kd3 Qb5+ 77. Ke4 Qb7+ 78. Nd5 Qb1+ 79. Ke3 Qg1+ 80. Kd3 Bxd5 81. Qxf6+ Qg7 82. Qd8+ Qg8 83. Qe7 Qg3+ 84. Be3 h5 1/2-1/2

Robert Byrne vs Vassily Smyslov
Alekhine Memorial, Moscow 1971

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. Qe2 a6 5. Bxc6 dxc6 6. Nc3 Bd6 7. d4 exd4 8. Nxd4 O-O 9. Bd2 Bb4 10. Nf3 Qe7 11. O-O-O Bxc3 12. Bxc3 Qxe4 13. Rhe1 Qxe2 14. Rxe2 Nd5 15. Be5 b5 16. Nd4 Bd7 17. Nb3 Rfe8 18. Rde1 f6 19. Bg3 Rxe2 20. Rxe2 Kf7 21. a3 g5 22. Nc5 Bf5 23. f3 a5 24. h3 h5 25. Re1 Rg8 26. Re2 Bc8 27. Nb3 a4 28. Nc5 Bf5 29. Na6 Rc8 30. Re1 h4 31. Bh2 Be6 32. Nc5 Re8 33. Na6 Re7 34. b3 f5 35. Kd2 f4 36. Bg1 Bf5 37. Rxe7+ Kxe7 38. Nb4 Nxb4 39. Bc5+ Ke6 40. Bxb4 1/2-1/2

Kenneth Rogoff vs William Martz
Lone Pine 1976

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. Qe2 d6 5. d4 Bd7 6. d5 Nb8 7. Bd3 g6 8. c4 c5 9. Nc3 Na6 10. h3 Nc7 11. a3 h5 12. O-O Bh6 13. Bxh6 Rxh6 14. Qe3 Ng8 15. b4 b6 16. Rab1 f6 17. Rb2 Rh7 18. bxc5 bxc5 19. Nh4 Rg7 20. f4 Rb8 21. Rxb8 Qxb8 22. fxe5 fxe5 23. Qg5 Qb2 24. Nxg6 Rf7 25. Nxe5 Rxf1+ 26. Bxf1 dxe5 27. Qxg8+ Ke7 28. Qg5+ 1-0

Kevin Spraggett vs Robert South
Canada Championship 1978

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. Qe2 d6 5. d4 Bd7 6. d5 Nb8 7. Bd3 g6 8. c4 Na6 9. Nc3 Nc5 10. Bc2 a5 11. h3 Bg7 12. Bg5 h6 13. Be3 Nh5 14. g3 Qc8 15. Nh4 Bf6 16. Nf5 Bg5 17. Bxc5 dxc5 18. h4 Bd8 19. Ba4 Nf6 20. Bxd7+ Qxd7 21. Ne3 Kf8 22. O-O-O Ne8 23. f4 Bf6 24. Ng4 Qe7 25. Rhf1 Kg7 26. d6 cxd6 27. Nd5 Qe6 28. f5 gxf5 29. Ngxf6 Nxf6 30. Nc7 Qd7 31. Nxa8 Rxa8 32. Rxf5 1-0

It always hurts to see the South go down…

Viswanathan Anand vs Susan Polgar
Amber-rapid, Monte Carlo 1994

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. Qe2 Be7 5. O-O O-O 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. Nxe5 Re8 8. d3 Bc5 9. Nf3 Bg4 10. Be3 Bd6 11. Nbd2 b5 12. h3 Bh5 13. a4 a6 14. Rfe1 c5 15. axb5 axb5 16. Qf1 c4 17. dxc4 bxc4 18. Qxc4 Bxf3 19. Nxf3 Rxe4 20. Qd3 Re8 21. Bd4 Rxa1 22. Rxa1 Nd5 23. Re1 Nf4 24. Qd2 Rxe1+ 25. Qxe1 h6 26. Qe4 Ne6 27. Be3 Qb8 28. b3 Qb5 29. g3 Qe2 30. Nd2 Be7 31. Qa8+ Kh7 32. Qf3 Qe1+ 33. Kg2 Kg8 34. Qa8+ Kh7 35. Nf3 Qc3 36. Qe4+ Kg8 37. Nd4 Nxd4 38. Bxd4 Qb4 39. c3 Qd6 40. b4 Qd7 41. b5 f5 42. Qb7 Bd6 43. c4 Kh7 44. Qd5 Qc8 45. c5 Bf8 46. c6 Kh8 47. Qd7 Qa8 48. Qxf5 Qe8 49. Be5 Qd8 50. Bxc7 1-0

Judit Polgar vs Boris Spassky
Veterans-Women 1994

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. Qe2 d6 5. O-O Bd7 6. c3 g6 7. d4 Qe7 8. dxe5 dxe5 9. a4 Bg7 10. b3 Nh5 11. g3 Qf6 12. Bg5 Qe6 13. Nbd2 Qg4 14. Kh1 O-O 15. Be3 Nf6 16. Rad1 Rad8 17. Ng1 Qxe2 18. Bxe2 b6 19. f3 Nh5 20. b4 f5 21. a5 f4 22. Bf2 fxg3 23. hxg3 g5 24. Nc4 g4 25. Ne3 Nf6 26. Kg2 gxf3+ 27. Bxf3 bxa5 28. b5 Ne7 29. c4 c6 30. bxc6 Nxc6 31. Nd5 Rf7 32. Ne2 Ng4 33. Bg1 h5 34. Rb1 Be6 35. Nec3 Nd4 36. Bd1 Rxf1 37. Kxf1 Bf8 38. Rb7 Rd7 39. Rb8 Kg7 40. Kg2 Rf7 41. Nf4 Bd7 42. Rb7 Nf6 43. Rb1 Bb4 44. Ncd5 Nxe4 45. Bxh5 Rf8 46. Ng6 Rf5 47. Nxe5 Nc2 48. Nxd7 Rxh5 49. g4 Ne1+ 50. Rxe1 Rxd5 51. Rxe4 Rxd7 52. c5 Rd2+ 53. Kf3 Rc2 54. Re7+ Kg6 55. Bd4 Rc4 56. Rg7+ Kh6 57. g5+ Kh5 58. Be3 Bxc5 59. Rh7+ Kg6 60. Rh6+ Kg7 61. Rc6 Bxe3 62. Rxc4 Bxg5 1/2-1/2

Alexandra Kosteniuk vs Elena Zayac
8th EU-Cup (women) 2003

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. Qe2 Bd6 5. c3 O-O 6. d3 Re8 7. Bg5 a6 8. Ba4 Bf8 9. Nbd2 d6 10. Nf1 h6 11. Bh4 g6 12. Ne3 Bg7 13. O-O Bd7 14. Bb3 Qc8 15. Nd2 Nh5 16. g3 Bh3 17. Ng2 Na5 18. Bd1 Nf6 19. f4 Bg4 20. Qf2 Be6 21. fxe5 Nh7 22. Bf6 dxe5 23. Bxg7 Kxg7 24. b4 Nc6 25. d4 exd4 26. cxd4 Ng5 27. Qf6+ Kg8 28. d5 Qd8 29. Qc3 Bxd5 30. exd5 Qxd5 31. h4 Ne6 32. Rf2 Qd4 33. Qxd4 Nexd4 34. Nb3 Nf5 35. g4 Nd6 36. a3 Ne5 37. Nd2 Kg7 38. Be2 f5 39. gxf5 Nxf5 40. Nc4 Rad8 41. Nxe5 Rxe5 42. Bg4 Ne3 43. Nxe3 Rxe3 44. Raf1 Re7 45. h5 Rd4 46. Rg2 g5 47. Bf5 Rc4 48. Rg3 c5 49. bxc5 Rxc5 50. Bg6 Rce5 51. Rgf3 Re1 52. Rf7+ Rxf7 53. Rxe1 Rc7 54. Re6 Rc3 55. a4 Rc4 56. a5 Rc5 57. Be4 Rxa5 58. Rg6+ Kf7 59. Rxh6 Re5 60. Bg6+ Kf6 61. Bd3+ Kg7 62. Rh7+ Kf6 63. Rxb7 Re7 64. Rb8 Kg7 65. Rb6 Re8 66. h6+ Kh8 67. Rxa6 Rd8 68. Bg6 Rb8 69. Kg2 Rd8 70. Kg3 Rb8 71. Kg4 Rb4+ 72. Kh5 Rb8 73. Ra7 g4 74. Rh7+ Kg8 75. Rg7+ Kh8 76. Be4 Rb5+ 77. Kg6 Rg5+ 78. Kxg5 1-0

Magnus Carlsen vs Can Arduman
19th EU-Cup 2003

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. Qe2 Be7 5. O-O d6 6. d4 Bd7 7. Bxc6 Bxc6 8.
Nc3 exd4 9. Nxd4 Bd7 10. f4 O-O 11. Kh1 Re8 12. e5 dxe5 13. fxe5 Bd6 14. Bf4
Bg4 15. Qb5 Bd7 16. Qxb7 Bxe5 17. Bxe5 Rxe5 18. Rad1 Qc8 19. Qf3 c5 20. Nb3 Bc6
21. Qg3 Qg4 22. Qxg4 Nxg4 23. Na5 Be8 24. Nc4 Re6 25. h3 Nf6 26. Rf5 Rc8 27.
Nd6 Rc6 28. Nb7 g6 29. Rxc5 Rb6 30. Nd8 Red6 31. Rxd6 Rxd6 32. Rc8 Rd2 33. Nc6
Rxc2 34. Nxa7 Rxb2 35. Ne4 Kg7 36. Nxf6 Ba4 37. Ne8+ Kh6 38. Nd6 f5 39. a3 Rb3
40. Nf7+ Kh5 41. Rh8 g5 42. Ne5 g4 43. Rxh7+ Kg5 44. hxg4 fxg4 45. Rg7+ Kf6 46.
Rxg4 Rxa3 47. Nac6 1-0

Magnus Carlsen vs Davide Isonzo
Claude Pecaut Memorial 2003

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. Qe2 Be7 5. O-O d6 6. d4 exd4 7. Nxd4 Bd7 8.
Bxc6 bxc6 9. Rd1 O-O 10. e5 dxe5 11. Nxc6 Qe8 12. Nxe7+ Qxe7 13. Bg5 Bc6 14.
Qc4 Qe6 15. Qxe6 fxe6 16. Nd2 Rab8 17. b3 Nd5 18. Nc4 Rf5 19. Be3 Nf4 20. Bxf4
exf4 21. Re1 Rg5 22. g3 Bd5 23. Ne5 Rf8 24. c4 Bb7 25. Nd7 Rf7 26. Re5 Rgf5 27.
g4 Rxe5 28. Nxe5 Rf8 29. Rd1 h5 30. Ng6 Re8 31. Nxf4 hxg4 32. Rd7 Bf3 33. Nh5
Rf8 34. Rxg7+ Kh8 35. Rd7 Rf5 36. Ng3 Re5 37. Kf1 Ra5 38. a4 Ra6 39. Ke1 Rb6
40. Rd3 e5 41. Kd2 a5 42. h4 Kh7 43. Re3 Re6 44. Ne4 Kg6 45. Ng5 Rd6+ 46. Kc3
e4 47. Nxe4 Rd1 48. Ng3 Rc1+ 49. Kd2 Ra1 50. h5+ Kf6 51. Re8 Ra2+ 52. Ke3 Rb2
53. h6 Kg6 54. Re6+ Kh7 55. Kf4 Rxb3 56. Nf5 Rb6 57. Re7+ Kh8 58. Kg5 Rc6 59.
Nd4 Rxc4 60. Re8+ Kh7 61. Ne6 Re4 62. Re7+ Kh8 63. Kg6 1-0

I leave you with this game, played by a young boy from the Great State of Florida, who was one of the highly-touted junior players that left chess. I used a quote on this blog some time ago about an Emory student who told his frat brothers he was, at one time, a junior chess champion. I confirmed this before being told that AJ said he quit chess because “It has become a game for children.” Who am I to argue with AJ’s astute insight?

AJ Steigman (2242) vs Alex Sherzer (2494)
Philadelphia NCC 2003

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. Qe2 Bc5 5. O-O O-O 6. d3 d6 7. h3 Bd7 8. Nc3
a6 9. Ba4 Ba7 10. Bb3 Re8 11. Nd5 h6 12. c3 Be6 13. Be3 Bxd5 14. Bxd5 Nxd5 15.
exd5 Ne7 16. Bxa7 Rxa7 17. c4 Ng6 18. g3 f5 19. Nh2 c5 20. Rab1 a5 21. Rfe1 b6
22. f4 Qf6 23. fxe5 Rxe5 24. Qf2 f4 25. g4 Rae7 26. Rxe5 Nxe5 27. Rd1 f3 28. b3
Rf7 29. d4 cxd4 30. Rxd4 Qg6 31. Rd1 h5 32. Rd4 Qb1+ 33. Nf1 hxg4 34. hxg4 Nd3
35. Qe3 f2+ 36. Kg2 Ne1+ 37. Kh2 Qh7+ 38. Kg3 Qh1 39. Qe8+ Rf8 40. Qe6+ Kh8 41.
Rf4 Qg1+ 42. Kh3 Qxf1+ 43. Kh4 Qh1+ 44. Kg5 Qh6+ 0-1

Georgians at UT Dallas Fall FIDE Open

FM Gurevich Daniel, NM Damir Studen, NM Michael Corallo, and NM Sanjay Ghatti travelled to Dallas, Texas, to participate in the UT Dallas Fall Fide 2014 chess tournament during the 51st anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, with the Coups d’état taking place in the heart of the city at Dealey Plaza, on Friday, November 22, 1963, a day that will live in infamy.

Georgia players made their presence felt in the first round:

NM Michael P Corallo vs GM Kayden W Troff
UT Dallas Fall Fide 2014
Rd 1

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6.
Bg5 Nbd7 7. Bc4 Qc7 8. Bb3 e6 9. Qd2 Nc5 10. Bxf6 gxf6 11. O-O-O Bd7 12. Qf4
Be7 13. Nf5 exf5 14. Nd5 Qc8 15. Nxe7 Kxe7 16. Qxd6+ Ke8 17. Qxf6 Nxb3+ 18.
axb3 Rg8 19. Qe5+ Kf8 20. Qd6+ Ke8 21. Qe5+ Kf8 22. Qd6+ 1/2 – 1/2

FM Daniel Gurevich vs GM Conrad Holt
UT Dallas Fall Fide 2014
Rd 1

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.exd5 exd5 4.Nf3 Bd6 5.c4 Nf6 6.Nc3 dxc4 7.Bxc4 O-O 8.O-O Nc6 9.h3 h6 10.a3 Bf5 11.Re1 Re8 12.Rxe8 Qxe8 13.Be3 Rd8 14.Qe2 Qd7 15.Rd1 Ne4 16.Nb5 Re8 17.d5 Ne5 18.Nxd6 Nxd6 19.Nxe5 Rxe5 20.Rd4 Qe7 21.g4 Bg6 22.Bd3 Bxd3 23.Qxd3 h5 24.Kg2 hxg4 25.hxg4 Qd7 26.Qd1 Nb5 27.Rd3 Re4 28.f3 Re8 29.d6 Nxd6 30.Bxa7 Qb5 31.Bd4 Nc4 32.a4 Qg5 33.Qc2 Nd6 34.Qd2 Qg6 35.Re3 Rxe3 36.Bxe3 f5 37.Qd5 Kh7 38.Bf4 fxg4 39.Bxd6 cxd6 40.Qxb7 Qc2 41.Kg3 gxf3 42.Qxf3 Qxa4 1/2-1/2

NM Damir Studen v GM Cristhian Cruz
The UT Dallas Fall FIDE Open 2014
Rd 1

1. d4 e6 2. c4 Nf6 3. Nf3 b6 4. g3 Ba6 5. b3 Bb4+ 6. Bd2
Be7 7. Bg2 d5 8. Ne5 c6 9. Bf4 Nfd7 10. Nxd7 Nxd7 11. Nd2 O-O 12. e4 Bb4 13.
Qc2 e5 14. dxe5 dxc4 15. bxc4 Qe7 16. O-O Nxe5 17. Qa4 Nxc4 18. Qxa6 Nxd2 19.
Rfd1 Nxe4 20. Qc4 Nc3 21. Re1 Qc5 22. Qxc5 Bxc5 23. Bxc6 Rad8 24. Be5 Nd5 25.
a3 Ne7 26. Bb5 Rd2 27. Re2 Rfd8 28. Bc3 Rxe2 29. Bxe2 Nc6 30. Bb5 Nd4 31. Bxd4
Rxd4 32. Ra2 g6 33. a4 Kf8 34. Re2 a6 35. Bc6 Rd6 36. Re8+ Kg7 37. Bf3 Kf6 38.
Be2 Rd4 39. Bxa6 Rxa4 40. Be2 Ra2 41. Kf1 b5 42. f4 b4 43. Rb8 Rc2 44. h3 h5
45. Rb7 Ke6 46. Bd3 Rc1+ 47. Ke2 Be7 48. Be4 f5 49. Rb6+ Bd6 50. Bf3 Rc2+ 51.
Kd3 Rh2 52. Kd4 Rxh3 53. Bd5+ Kd7 54. Rb7+ Bc7 55. Kc5 Rxg3 56. Bc6+ Kc8 57.
Rxb4 Rg4 58. Be8 Kd8 59. Bc6 Bxf4 60. Rd4+ Ke7 61. Rd7+ Kf6 62. Kd4 1/2-1/2

Yet another escape from Damir, the Houdini of Georgia chess. He seems to have a penchant for holding a bad position, a good quality to possess.

GM Conrad Holt vs NM Michael P Corallo
The UT Dallas Fall FIDE Open 2014
Rd 2

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.Qc2 O-O 5.e4 d6 6.a3 Bxc3 7.bxc3 c5 8.e5 dxe5 9.dxe5 Ng4 10.f4 f6 11.exf6 Qxf6 12.Bd3 e5 13.Nf3 exf4 14.Bxh7 Kh8 15.O-O Nc6 16.h3 Nh6 17.Bxf4 Qxf4 18.Nh4 Qe3 19.Kh1 Rxf1 20.Rxf1 g6 21.Nxg6 Kg7 22.Nf4 Qe8 23.Bg6 Qe3 24.Nh5 Kh8 25.Rf8 Ng8 26.Rf7 Nh6 27.Rf8 Ng8 28.Rf7 Nh6 29.Rh7 Kg8 30.Qd1 Bxh3 31.Qd5 1-0

FM Daniel Gurevich vs NM Christopher Toolin
The UT Dallas Fall FIDE Open 2014
Rd 3

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nd2 Nf6 4.e5 Nfd7 5.Bd3 c5 6.c3 Nc6 7.Ne2 cxd4 8.cxd4 f6 9.exf6 Nxf6 10.Nf3 Bd6 11.O-O Qc7 12.Bg5 O-O 13.Bh4 g6 14.Bg3 Nh5 15.Bxd6 Qxd6 16.Bb5 Nd8 17.Ne5 Nf7 18.f4 Qb6 19.Qd3 Nd6 20.Ba4 Ne4 21.Bc2 Nhf6 22.g4 Bd7 23.a4 Bc6 24.Rab1 a5 25.Nc3 Rad8 26.Qe3 Nd6 27.Bd3 Nf7 28.h3 Nxe5 29.Qxe5 Rde8 30.Qe3 Qb4 31.Bc2 Nd7 32.Rf3 e5 33.Na2 Qxd4 34.fxe5 Nxe5 35.Rxf8 Rxf8 36.Qxd4 Nf3 37.Kg2 Nxd4 38.Bd1 Ne6 39.b4 d4 40.Kg3 Ng5 41.Rb2 Ne4 42.Kh2 Nc3 43.Bb3 Kg7 44.bxa5 Rf3 45.Nb4 Be4 46.Rd2 d3 47.Bc4 Nb1 48.Rxd3 Bxd3 49.Nxd3 Na3 50.a6 Nxc4 51.axb7 Rf8 52.Nc5 Na5 53.Ne6 Kg8 54.Nxf8 Nxb7 55.Ne6 Kf7 56.Ng5 Kg7 57.Kg3 h6 58.Ne4 Kf7 59.Kf4 1-0

FM Alec Getz vs FM Daniel Gurevich
The UT Dallas Fall FIDE Open 2014
Rd 4

1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 Nc6 3.g3 g6 4.Bg2 Bg7 5.d3 d6 6.Be3 Rb8 7.Nge2 e5 8.Nd5 (TN) Nge7 9.c3 O-O 10.O-O Nxd5 11.exd5 Ne7 12.a3 Nf5 13.Bd2 Bd7 14.b4 b6 15.Qb3 Qc7 16.Rfc1 Rfe8 17.Rab1 h5 18.b5 h4 19.Qc4 h3 20.Bh1 Qd8 21.a4 Bh6 22.Bxh6 Nxh6 23.Rc2 f5 24.Nc1 Qg5 25.Nb3 Ng4 26.Nd2 Re7 27.Re1 Rbe8 28.Qa2 Kg7 29.Nc4 Qf6 30.Rce2 e4 31.dxe4 fxe4 32.Bxe4 Rxe4 33.Rxe4 Qf3 0-1

GM Nadezhda Kosintseva vs NM Sanjay Ghatti
The UT Dallas Fall FIDE Open 2014
Rd 4

1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 c5 4.dxc5 Nc6 5.Nf3 Bg4 6.c3 a6 7.Bf4 (7. Be3 Bxf3 8. Qxf3 Nxe5 9. Qd1 e6 10. Be2 Ne7 11. b4 Nf5 12. Bf4 Nc6 13. O-O g6 14. Bd3 Bg7 15. Bxf5 gxf5 16. Bd6 a5 17. bxa5 Rxa5 18. Nd2 Qd7 19. Nb3 Ra4 20. Nd2 Ra3 21. Rb1 Be5 22. Bxe5 Nxe5 23. Re1 Ng6 24. Qc1 Rxa2 25. Nf3 O-O 26. h4 f6 27. Rb6 e5 28. Qb1 Ra7 29. Rd6 Qc8 30. Rxd5 Ne7 31. Rd6 Qxc5 32. Qb3+ Kh8 33. Rd7 Ng6 34. Qe6 b5 35. Rxa7 Qxa7 36. Qxf5 Qg7 37. Rd1 Nf4 38. g3 Ne2+ 39. Kg2 Qg6 40. Qxg6 hxg6 41. Rd7 Nxc3 42. Rb7 Kg8 43. g4 Rd8 44. h5 g5 45. Nh2 Rd4 46. f3 Rd2+ 47. Kh1 Rb2 48. Nf1 e4 49. fxe4 Nxe4 50. Ne3 Rb3 51. Nd5 Nf2+ 52. Kg1 Nxg4 53. Ne7+ Kf8 54. Nf5 Rh3 55. h6 Nxh6 56. Kg2 g4 57. Nd4 Re3 58. Kf2 Re4 59. Nxb5 Rb4 60. Rh7 Rxb5 61. Rxh6 Kg7 62. Rh4 f5 63. Kg3 Kg6 64. Rh8 Rb3+ 65. Kg2 Kg5 0-1, Tatiana Kosintseva 2515 vs Alexandra Kosteniuk 2495, 63rd ch-RUS w 2013) 7… e6 8.b4 Nge7 9.Bd3 d4 10.h3 (This position was reached in the game Gulruhbegim Tokhirjonova 2126 vs Ekaterina Dyakonova 1928, 2013 WCh U14 Girls when 10 a3 was played-1-0 49) Bxf3 11.Qxf3 dxc3 12.Nxc3 Nxb4 13.Be4 Nec6 14.O-O Nd4 15.Qg4 Nbc6 16.Rfd1 Qc7 17.Bxc6 Nxc6 18.Ne4 h5 19.Qg3 Nb4 20.Nd6 Bxd6 21.cxd6 Qd7 22.Qxg7 O-O-O 23.Rac1 Nc6 24.Qg3 Kb8 25.Qb3 Rc8 26.Be3 b5 27.Bb6 Kb7 28.Bc7 Nxe5 29.Qe3 1-0

NM Damir Studen vs FM Alec Getz
The UT Dallas Fall FIDE Open 2014
Rd 5

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 b6 4.a3 Bb7 5.Nc3 d5 6.cxd5 exd5 7.Bg5 Be7 8.e3 O-O 9.Be2 Nbd7 10.O-O Ne4 11.Bf4 Bd6 12.Bxd6 Nxc3 13.bxc3 cxd6 14.c4 Nf6 1/2-1/2

FM Daniel Gurevich vs GM Cristhian Cruz
UT Dallas Fall Fide 2014
Rd 5

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6.
h3 e6 7. g4 Be7 8. Bg2 Nfd7 9. Be3 Nc6 10. Qe2 O-O 11. O-O-O Nxd4 12. Bxd4 b5
13. e5 d5 14. Nxd5 exd5 15. Bxd5 Rb8 16. Ba7 Rb7 17. Bxb7 Bxb7 18. Rhe1 Qc7 19.
e6 Nf6 20. Bd4 Nd5 21. Qe5 Qxe5 22. Rxe5 f6 23. Ree1 Re8 24. h4 Nf4 25. Bb6 Ng2
26. Rh1 Bc6 27. Rd4 Bf8 28. Rd8 Rxe6 29. Bc5 Be8 30. Bxf8 Kxf8 31. Kd2 Ke7 32.
Rd4 Bc6 33. Rh3 Ne1 34. Rf4 Kd6 35. b3 Ng2 36. Rd4+ Kc5 37. Rd8 Kb6 38. h5 h6
39. Rd4 a5 40. a3 Ne1 41. Rf4 Ng2 42. Rd4 Ne1 43. Rf4 Ng2 1/2-1/2

After five rounds FM Gurevich has 3 points; NMs Corallo and Studen have 2 points; and NM Ghatti has 1 1/2 points. Round 6 will be contested tonight, Monday, November 24, 5:00 p.m, CST. (http://www.utdallas.edu/chess/chess-team/fall-fide-open-2014.html)

“Widespread concerns about the potential for cheating”

During the opening of the final round game between Nafisa Muminova and Alexandra Kosteniuk in the Tashkent Women’s Grand Prix being held in Uzbekistan it has been reported that Muminova lost when her cellphone went off. Mark Crowther reported via something called a “Tweet” that, “Muminova’s phone went off for an immediate loss.” http://www.theweekinchess.com/live
Here is the complete game:
Muminova, Nafisa – Kosteniuk, Alexandra
FIDE WGP Tashkent Tashkent UZB (11.2), 2013.09.30
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Nc6 6.Bg5 e6 7.Qd2 a6 8.O-O-O h6 9.Bh4 Nxe4 10.Qf4 0-1
A short while ago my friend the Discman, after reading one of my posts concerning cheating, sent me an email asking if FIDE still allowed electronic devices in the playing hall. I was uncertain then, but it is evident from the incident today that FIDE does still allow gizmo’s in the tournament hall. Susan Polgar felt the urge to tweet, adding this on TWIC:
@SusanPolgar @albionado2 “It’s pretty hard to understand someone forgetting to turn off their phone in this day and age. Very careless.”
My mother used to have a saying, “It would not have happened if he had not been there.” I first heard it after the guys I usually drove around on the weekend as what would be called today the “designated driver,” since I did not drink, drove off an embankment and wound up in a hospital. Since I had a date that evening and could not drive them around, I was naturally blamed. If you think about it, in a way it is FIDE’s fault for not banning all gizmo’s.
One of my opponent’s in the Georgia State Championship, a fellow Senior, had his cellphone ring. Rather than answer it he just sat there looking stupid while it continued to ring and ring until he finally took it out of his pocket and turned it off. It was very loud and disrupted everyone in the vast playing hall. For this infraction of the rules he was penalized, losing only two minutes of time on his clock.
Geurt Gijssen discusses the issue in his column An Arbiter’s Notebook, on the Chess Café website of September 18, 2013, titled, “Widespread concerns about the potential for cheating.” Geurt writes in answer to a question concerning a cellphone going off:
“What are appropriate penalties? With the current Laws of Chess, there are few possibilities. See Article 12.3b:
Without the permission of the arbiter a player is forbidden to have a mobile phone or other electronic means of communication in the playing venue, unless they are completely switched off. If any such device produces a sound, the player shall lose the game. The opponent shall win. However, if the opponent cannot win the game by any series of legal moves, his score shall be a draw.”
There is much more to read and you can find it here: http://www.chesscafe.com/geurt/geurt183.htm