The Upsetting NM Michael Corallo

Georgian NM Michael Corallo continues to show good form and is off to an excellent start at the 2015 Philadelphia Open playing upsetting chess! He has won his first three games and is tied for first place with three other players. Michael dispatched IM Esserman’s (https://xpertchesslessons.wordpress.com/2015/03/15/the-horses-ess/) Najdorf in the second round and then beat fellow Atlantan, FM Daniel Gurevich in the third round using the dreaded Berlin defense. As I write Michael has Black against IM Akshat Chandra of New Jersey in a Nimzo-Indian, Qc2 variation. The games can be found at Chess24.com and Monroi.

Michael Corallo 2290 vs IM Marc Esserman 2427

Rd 2

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Bg5 Nbd7 7.Bc4 Qb6 8.Bb3 e6 9.Qd2 Be7 10.O-O-O Nc5 11.Rhe1 h6 12.Bxf6 Bxf6 13.Kb1 O-O 14.f4 Qc7 15.g4 b5 16.g5 hxg5 17.fxg5 Be5 18.g6 fxg6 19.Qg2 Nxb3 20.axb3 Rf6 21.Nf3 Bf4 22.e5 dxe5 23.Ne4 Rf8 24.Nfg5 Qe7 25.Rg1 Rf5 26.Qg4 Kf8 27.Qh4 Bxg5 28.Rxg5 Bb7 29.Nd6 Qf6 30.Nxf5 exf5 31.Rd7 1-0

FM Daniel Gurevich 2373 vs Michael Corallo 2290

Rd 3

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.O-O Nxe4 5.Re1 Nd6 6.Nxe5 Be7 7.Bf1 Nxe5 8.Rxe5 O-O 9.d4 Bf6 10.Re1 Nf5 11.c3 d5 12.Nd2 Re8 13.Rxe8 Qxe8 14.Nf3 Nh4 15.Nxh4 Bxh4 16.Bf4 c6 17.Bd3 Bf6 18.Qc2 g6 19.Qd2 Be6 20.Re1 Qd7 21.Bg5 Bg7 22.h4 Re8 23.h5 Bg4 24.Rxe8 Qxe8 25.h6 Bf8 26.f3 Bd7 27.Kf2 Qe6 28.Qf4 Bd6 29.Qh4 Bf8 30.g4 c5 31.Bd8 cxd4 32.cxd4 Bb4 33.Qg5 Qe1 34.Kg2 Bd6 35.Qf6 Qd2 36.Kg1 Bf8 37.Bf1 Bxh6 38.Bc7 Bg5 0-1

The Perdomo Class Championship

When the Legendary Georgia Ironman first mentioned the Georgia Class had been changed to the Perdomo Class Championship I was stunned, saying, “When did Carlos die?” Fortunately, IM Carlos Perdomo lives. The usual practice has been to name a tournament after someone, or even two former players, whose spirits have departed for the chessboard in the sky. Those in control of the GCA have seen fit to do things differently. For example, the current Fun E administration seems loathe to take entry fees at the door on the day of the tournament. It was therefore no surprise when the Ironman told me he had picked up an extra lesson on Saturday, the second day of the tournament. When Tim said to the chess dad, “But I thought your son was playing in the Perdomo.” (As in the “BoKo” which is short for the Boris Kogan Memorial. Since Carlos is still with us it is the “Perdomo.” Once his spirit heads to the sky it will, no doubt, become the “Domo.”) The chess dad said, “I could not enter online, and I tried many times, until finally giving up. Every time I tried to enter it would go back a page.” Sometimes progress ain’t…I cannot help but wonder how many others had the same problem and did not participate?

Unfortunately, I only learned some of the games were broadcast live on Chess Stream after the tournament ended. LM David Vest, who, according to Tim, also had trouble entering, had mentioned the fact to the Ironman, asking him to let me know, but it slipped the Ironmind. I had previously seen the announcement on the moribund GCA website (http://www.georgiachess.org/), but nothing was mentioned about any games being broadcast live, and having been to the GCA online magazine (http://georgiachessnews.com/), I can attest to the fact that there was no mention of this fact. What is the point of having games broadcast if the news is not advertised?

Mr. Vest mentioned something about Masters receiving free entry providing they jumped through many GCA hoops. The man from the High Planes did just that but said “Katie was in Alaska and by the time I was able to enter it was too late.” I was, therefore, pleased to see the Drifter was able to play four rounds after a first round half point bye. David is a fellow Senior and obviously not ready to drift away toward the sky.

There were seventy-five players in all sections combined, about what we used to get at the House of Pain when the usual suspects were rounded up. Unfortunately, there were only eight players in the top section. This makes me wonder about reports being received concerning a boycott of GCA tournaments by the higher rated players. I have learned it is not an “official” boycott per se, in the sense that anyone has led a boycott, but more of an unofficial type boycott. Word must not have gotten to the eight intrepid players who chose to “cross the line.”

NM Michael Coralllo, who has been playing very well the past several years, was the top rated player when he sat down in the first round to play a former student of the Legendary Georgia Ironman, Albert Liang, who is now learning from GM Alsonso Zapata. I went with Tim to the home of Albert where we double-teamed the young man during a lesson, and I can relate that after leaving, the Ironman and I were the ones who felt double teamed!

Albert Liang (2019) – Michael Corallo (2371)

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Bc4 e6 7. O-O b5 8. Bb3 Be7 9. Qf3 Qb6 10. Be3 Qb7 11. Qg3 O-O 12. Bh6 Ne8 13. f3 Bd7 14. Rad1 Nc6 15. Nxc6 Bxc6 16. Ne2 Kh8 17. Be3 Nf6 18. Nd4 Be8 19. Kh1 Nd7 20. Bf4 Qb6 21. Ne2 Ne5 22. c3 Qc5 23. Nc1 Qc7 24. Nd3 Ng6 25. Be3 Rg8 26. f4 Qb7 27. f5 Nf8 28. Nf4 exf5 29. exf5 Bc6 30. Bxf7 Bh4 31. Qxh4 Qxf7 32. Rxd6 Rc8 33. Kg1 Qxf5 34. Bd4 Bb7 35. Nh5 Qc2 36. Qg3 1-0

Can you spell U-P-S-E-T? Mr. Corallo did not let this loss upset him, playing the swiss gambit the way it is supposed to be played by winning his next four games and taking clear first. That is showing your class in style!
I was surprised to see the move 6 Bc4 has only scored 48% according to the CBDB. Back in the day it was THE MOVE. White has scored 54% against 11…0-0, and it is the preferred move of the big three “engines” shown on the CBDB, but 11…b4 has held White to only 45%. After 12…Ne8 365Chess.com calls this the, B90 Sicilian, Najdorf, Lipnitzky attack, which is a new one on me…
The game Rojas, Luis (2432) – Andaur, Claudio (2095) CHI-ch, 02/12/2002, varied with 13…Kh8 14. Bg5 Bxg5 15. Qxg5 Qb6 16. Qe3 Bd7 17. Qf2 Nc6 18. Nxc6 Qxf2+ 19. Rxf2 Bxc6 20. Rd2 Rd8 21. Rad1 g5 22. Ne2 Rg8 23. h3 Rg6 24. c4 bxc4 25. Bxc4 Bb7 26. b4 h5 27. Kf2 Kg7 28. e5 d5 29. Bd3 Rh6 30. Nd4 Nc7 31. Rc2 Rd7 32. Rdc1 Na8 33. Nb3 f6 34. Nc5 Re7 35. Nxb7 Rxb7 36. Bxa6 Rf7 37. Rc6 fxe5 38. b5 g4 39. b6 Nxb6 40. Rxb6 gxf3 41. gxf3 Rhf6 42. Rg1+ Kh6 43. Ke2 Rxf3 44. Rxe6+ R3f6 45. Rxf6+ Rxf6 46. Bb5 e4 47. Rd1 Rf3 48. Rxd5 Ra3 49. Rd2 Rxh3 50. a4 Kg5 51. Rd8 Ra3 52. Rd5+ Kf4 53. Rxh5 Ra2+ 54. Kd1 e3 55. Rh8 Ke4 56. Kc1 Kd4 57. Rd8+ Ke4 58. Kb1 Rh2 59. Rc8 Kd4 60. Rc2 Rh1+ 61. Kb2 Rh5 62. Kb3 Rh3 63. Kb4 Rh1 64. Ka5 Rh6 65. Be2 Kd5 66. Kb5 Rh1 67. a5 Rb1+ 68. Ka4 Rb8 69. a6 Ra8 70. Kb5 Rb8+ 71. Ka5 Kd6 72. Bb5 Rd8 1-0

The third round featured this game between the two Masters in the field.

David Vest (2200) – Michael Corallo (2371)

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. g3 a6 4. Bg2 b5 5. O-O Bb7 6. b3 Be7 7. d3 O-O 8. e4 d6 9. Nc3 Nfd7 10. Rb1 c5 11. Qe2 Bf6 12. Bb2 Nc6 13. cxb5 axb5 14. Nxb5 Nde5 15. Bxe5 Nxe5 16. Nxe5 Bxe5 17. f4 Bf6 18. Rfc1 Qb6 19. a4 Rad8 20. Kh1 Ba6 21. Na3 g6 22. Nc4 Qb4 23. e5 dxe5 24. fxe5 Bg5 25. Rc2 Rd4 26. Be4 Rfd8 27. Qf3 Bxc4 28. Rxc4 Rxc4 29. dxc4 Qb8 30. h4 Bh6 31. Rf1 Rf8 32. a5 Bg7 33. a6 Bxe5 34. Kg2 Qb6 35. Bb7 Bb8 36. h5 Qd6 37. Rd1 Qe5 38. Rh1 Rd8 39. hxg6 Rd2 40. Kh3 hxg6 41. Rf1 Qh8 0-1

This is cutting edge theory being played here in the Deep South folks, as Bartosz Socko (2631) played 8…d5 against Hristos Banikas (2572) in Beijing at the 1st WMSG Blitz Pair, 10/08/2008, and lost. Vereslav Eingorn (2560) also played 8…d6 versus Bogomil Andonov (2415) at Uzhgorod in 1988 and won after 9. Nc3 b4 10. Ne2 c5 11. Ne1 Nc6 12. f4 a5 13. Nf3 a4 14. Rb1 axb3 15. axb3 Ra2 16. h3 Nd7 17. g4 Bf6 18. Bd2 g6 19. g5 Bg7 20. f5 Re8 21. f6 Bf8 22. Nf4 Nb6 23. Re1 d5 24. exd5 exd5 25. Rxe8 Qxe8 26. cxd5 Ne5 27. Ra1 Ra3 28. Rb1 Nxd5 29. Qe2 Nxf3+ 30. Bxf3 Qxe2 31. Bxe2 Ra2 32. Bf3 Nxf4 0-1
FYI, 365Chess calls this the, A13 English, Romanishin gambit.

The fourth round Sunday morning saw the grizzled veteran facing the new kid on the block.

David Vest (2200) – Albert Liang (2019)

1. c4 e6 2. g3 Nf6 3. Bg2 d5 4. Nf3 Be7 5. O-O O-O 6. b3 b6 7. Bb2 Bb7 8. d3 c5 9. Nbd2 Nc6 10. a3 Nd7 11. Rb1 dxc4 12. Nxc4 Qc7 13. Qc1 Rac8 14. Qe3 Bf6 15. Ng5 Bxb2 16. Rxb2 Rb8 17. b4 cxb4 18. axb4 Nce5 19. Nxe5 Qxe5 20. Qxe5 Nxe5 21. Bxb7 Rxb7 22. Rc1 h6 23. Ne4 Rd7 24. f3 Ng6 25. Rbc2 Ne7 26. Kf2 Nd5 27. b5 Rfd8 28. Rc4 Kf8 29. Ra4 Rb8 30. Nd2 Ne7 31. Nc4 Rbb7 32. Rca1 f6 33. R1a3 Nf5 34. e3 Ke7 35. Ke2 Nd6 36. Nxd6 Kxd6 37. d4 Rbc7 38. Kd2 e5 39. Rd3 Ke6 40. dxe5 Rxd3 41. Kxd3 Kxe5 42. f4 Kd6 43. Rd4 Ke6 44. e4 Rc5 45. f5 Ke7 46. Ra4 Rxb5 47. Rxa7 Kf8 48. Ke3 Re5 49. Rb7 b5 50. Kd4 Kg8 51. Rc7 Kf8 52. Rc5 Re7 53. Rxb5 Ra7 54. Rb3 Ra2 55. h3 Ra7 56. Ke3 Kf7 57. Kf4 g5 58. Kg4 Re7 59. Rb4 Kg7 60. Kh5 Kh7 61. Rb6 Kg7 62. Re6 Rd7 63. e5 fxe5 64. Rxh6 Rd3 65. Rg6 Kf7 66. Kg4 e4 67. Re6 Re3 68. Rg6 Re1 69. Kxg5 e3 70. Re6 e2 71. g4 Rh1 72. Rxe2 Rxh3 73. Ra2 1-0

As Bobby Fischer famously said, “That’s what chess is all about. One day you give your opponent a lesson, the next day he gives you one.” (http://www.chessquotes.com/player-fischer)
Playing over this English brings back memories of the High Planes Drifter regaling us with tales of the daze he was moving around the left coast in LA and of GM Eduard Gufeld and NM Jerry Hanken, who loved playing 1 c4. Up through 4…Be7 365Chess shows this as “A13 English opening,” but when Mr. Vest played 5 0-0 it became a, “A14 English, Neo-Catalan declined.” 10…Nd7 is the new move. Previously the two most common moves have been Qc7 and Qd7, the move of Houdini, but the new World Chess Champion thing, known as Komodo, prefers 10…Re8, but what does IT know?

Albert drew with the always dangerous Carter Peatman in the last round to finish in a three-way tie for second place with Djordje Nedeljkovic, who is a provisionally rated NM after eighteen games, and Expert Sinclair Gray, all with a score of 3-2.

Jeremy Banta took clear first in the class A section, Matt Mayhew, from Tennessee was also clear first in the B class, as was Anthony John Morse in the C class, and Sanjeev Anand did the same in class D. Not to be outdone, Harold Blackmarr also won the below section, for everyone else, a half-point ahead of the pack.

Games can be found here: http://chessstream.com/TournamentGames.aspx?TournamentID=98

UT Dallas Fall FIDE Open: It Don’t Come Easy

FM Daniel Gurevich continue to impress the chess world not only with his results, but also with his stellar play. He finished +1, with a score of 5-4, leaving him in a tie for 14th place. Daniel exited the tournament on a winning note by playing this spectacular game:

FM Daniel Gurevich vs IM Keaton F Kiewra
UT Dallas Fall Fide 2014
Rd 9

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. Nc3 Nc6 4. d4 cxd4 5. Nxd4 Qc7 6.
g3 a6 7. Bg2 Nf6 8. O-O Bc5 9. Nxc6 dxc6 10. e5 Qxe5 11. Bf4 Qd4 12. Qe2 Be7
13. Rfd1 Qc5 14. Na4 Qa5 15. b3 O-O 16. Bd2 Qc7 17. Bf4 Qa5 18. Bd2 Bb4 19. c3
Be7 20. c4 Bb4 21. Be3 Nd7 22. Qc2 Be7 23. c5 Qc7 24. Nb6 Nxb6 25. cxb6 Qe5 26.
Bd4 Qa5 27. a3 Qh5 28. Qc3 f6 29. b4 e5 30. Bc5 Bxc5 31. Qc4+ Kh8 32. Qxc5 Bg4
33. Rd6 Rae8 34. a4 Qf7 35. h3 Bc8 36. b5 cxb5 37. axb5 axb5 38. Bd5 Qh5 39.
Bg2 f5 40. Ra8 f4 41. g4 Qh4 Stop!

However you intend on reviewing this game, take a moment to cogitate on White’s next move. As a hint let me say that after teaching budding chess Spuds to ask and answer three questions (1 “Why did my opponent make that move?” 2 “What move do I want, or need, to make, and why?” & 3 “Am I leaving anything en prise?”), the next thing I teach is to, “Examine all checks!” The remaining moves are given at the end of the article.

IM Denis Kadric vs FM Daniel Gurevich
UT Dallas Fall Fide 2014
Rd 6

1.d3 g6 2.g3 Bg7 3.Bg2 c5 4.e4 Nc6 5.f4 d6 6.Nf3 Bg4 7.h3 Bxf3 8.Qxf3 e6 9.c3 Nge7 10.O-O O-O 11.Be3 Qd7 12.Rd1 Rac8 13.Na3 f5 14.Qe2 Kh8 15.Nc2 Qc7 16.Bf2 Rce8 17.d4 cxd4 18.Nxd4 Nxd4 19.cxd4 fxe4 20.Qxe4 Nd5 21.h4 Qf7 22.Rac1 Re7 23.a3 Rfe8 24.Qe2 Qf5 25.Be4 Qf7 26.Bf3 Rf8 27.Rd3 Bh6 28.Re1 Rfe8 29.Qf1 Bg7 30.Qg2 Nb6 31.Rd2 Nc4 32.Rde2 d5 33.h5 Nd6 34.hxg6 hxg6 35.Qh2 Kg8 36.g4 g5 37.f5 Ne4 38.Bxe4 dxe4 39.Rxe4 exf5 40.Rxe7 Rxe7 41.Rxe7 Qxe7 42.Qb8 Kh7 43.gxf5 Qe4 44.Qh2 Kg8 45.Qd6 Qg4 46.Kf1 1/2-1/2

FM Daniel Gurevich vs IM Kacper Drozdowski
UT Dallas Fall Fide 2014
Rd 7

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.Nc3 a6 4.g3 b5 5.Bg2 Bb7 6.d4 cxd4 7.Nxd4 b4 8.Na4 Nf6 9.O-O Bxe4 10.Bxe4 Nxe4 11.Re1 Nf6 12.c4 bxc3 13.Qb3 Nc6 14.Nxc6 dxc6 15.Qxc3 Rc8 16.Be3 Nd5 17.Qc4 Qa5 18.Bc5 Qb5 19.Rac1 Be7 20.Bxe7 Qxc4 21.Rxc4 Kxe7 22.Rec1 Kd6 23.Nc5 Rb8 24.b3 Rhc8 25.Ne4 Kd7 26.Nc5 Ke7 27.Nxa6 Ra8 28.Nb4 Nxb4 29.Rxb4 Rxa2 30.Rb7 Kf6 31.Rd1 Rc2 32.Rdd7 Rf8 33.h4 Kg6 34.Rdc7 h5 1/2-1/2

GM Nadezhda Kosintseva vs FM Daniel Gurevich
UT Dallas Fall Fide 2014
Rd 8

1.e4 c5 2.c3 Nf6 3.e5 Nd5 4.Nf3 Nc6 5.d4 cxd4 6.cxd4 d6 7.Bc4 Nb6 8.Bb5 dxe5 9.Nxe5 Bd7 10.Nxd7 Qxd7 11.O-O e6 12.Nc3 Rd8 13.Qb3 Be7 14.Be3 O-O 15.Rfd1 a6 16.Bxa6 bxa6 17.Qxb6 Nb4 18.Rac1 Rb8 19.Qa5 Rfd8 20.Rd2 Qb7 21.h3 Rbc8 22.a3 Nd5 23.Rdc2 Nb6 24.Na4 Rxc2 25.Rxc2 Nxa4 26.Qxa4 Bf6 27.Qc6 Qb3 28.Qc3 Qd5 29.Qc5 Qe4 30.Qc6 Qd3 31.Rd2 Qb5 32.Qxb5 axb5 33.Kf1 Kf8 34.Ke2 Ke7 35.Kd3 h5 36.b3 Ra8 37.Ra2 Rd8 38.Ke4 Kd6 39.a4 bxa4 40.Rxa4 Kc6 41.Ra7 h4 42.Rxf7 Rb8 43.Bf4 Rxb3 44.Be5 Rb2 45.Bxf6 Rxf2 46.Rxg7 Rxf6 47.Rg4 Rf2 48.Ke3 Ra2 49.Kf3 Ra3 50.Kf2 Ra2 51.Kg1 Kd5 52.Rxh4 Ra4 53.Rg4 Ra1 54.Kh2 Ra4 55.Kg3 Ra3 56.Kh4 e5 57.dxe5 Kxe5 58.Rg6 Kf4 59.Rf6 Ke5 60.Rf8 Ra4 61.g4 1-0

NM Michael Corallo, who has been playing excellent chess recently, finished with an even score, a half point behind Daniel.

NM Daniel Gater vs NM Michael Corallo
UT Dallas Fall Fide 2014
Rd 6

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Bg5 Nbd7 7.f4 Qc7 8.Qf3 h6 9.Bxf6 Nxf6 10.f5 Qc5 11.O-O-O g5 12.fxg6 Bg4 13.gxf7 Kxf7 14.Qd3 Bxd1 15.Nxd1 h5 16.Qb3 d5 17.Nf5 Nxe4 18.Bd3 Nf6 19.Re1 b5 20.Nh4 Bh6 21.Kb1 e6 22.Bg6 Ke7 23.Bf5 Qd4 24.Qg3 Ne4 25.Qc7 Kf6 26.Bxe4 1-0

FM Alex Getz vs NM Michael Corallo
UT Dallas Fall Fide 2014
Rd 8

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be2 e6 7.O-O Be7 8.f4 O-O 9.Kh1 Qc7 10.a4 Nc6 11.Be3 Re8 12.Bf3 Na5 13.Nde2 e5 14.f5 Nc4 15.Bc1 d5 16.exd5 Bxf5 17.Ng3 Bg6 18.Nge4 Nd6 19.Re1 Rac8 20.Nxf6 Bxf6 21.Bg4 Rcd8 22.a5 Nc4 23.Ne4 Bh4 24.g3 Be7 25.Qf3 Nxa5 26.Bd2 Nc4 27.Bc3 Bf8 28.Rad1 Nd6 29.Nxd6 Bxd6 30.Bf5 b5 31.Ra1 b4 32.Bd2 Qc4 33.Bxg6 hxg6 34.Qd3 Qxd3 35.cxd3 Bf8 36.Ra5 f6 37.Re4 Rb8 38.Rxa6 Rb5 39.d6 Rd5 40.Bxb4 Rxd3 41.Rc4 e4 42.Rac6 e3 43.Rc8 Rxc8 44.Rxc8 Kf7 45.Kg2 Bxd6 46.Bxd6 Rxd6 47.Kf3 Rd2 48.Rc7 Kg8 49.Kxe3 Rxh2 50.b4 Rb2 51.Rc4 Rb3 52.Kd4 Rxg3 53.b5 Rb3 54.Kc5 Kf7 55.b6 Ke6 56.Re4 Kd7 57.Rd4 Kc8 58.Re4 Rc3 59.Kb5 Rb3 60.Kc6 Rc3 61.Kb5 1/2-1/2

Michael defeated IM Justin Sarkar in the last round.

NM Damir Studen finished on -2, with a score of 3 1/2-5 1/2.

NM Damir Studen vs GM Kayden W Troff
UT Dallas Fall Fide 2014
Rd 7

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. g3 Bg7 4. Bg2 O-O 5. Nc3 Nc6 6.
Nf3 d5 7. cxd5 Nxd5 8. e4 Nxc3 9. bxc3 Na5 10. O-O c5 11. e5 cxd4 12. cxd4 Be6
13. Ng5 Bd5 14. Ne4 Rc8 15. Be3 b6 16. Qd2 Rc4 17. f3 Qd7 18. Qb2 Rfc8 19. Rfc1
Rxc1+ 20. Bxc1 Qa4 21. Bd2 Rc2 22. Qb4 Qxb4 23. Bxb4 Nc6 24. Be1 Bxe4 25. fxe4
Nxd4 26. Rd1 Bxe5 27. Bf2 Ne2+ 28. Kf1 Nc3 29. Rd7 Rxa2 30. Bf3 Kf8 31. h4 Ke8
32. Rb7 Kd8 33. Bg4 Bc7 34. e5 e6 35. Bf3 Nd5 0-1

WIM Mariam Danelia vs NM Damir Studen
UT Dallas Fall Fide 2014
Rd 7

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 d5 4.Nf3 Be7 5.Bf4 0-0 6.e3 a6 7.Qc2 Nbd7 8.h3 dxc4 9.Bxc4 b5 10.Be2 c5 11.dxc5 Nxc5 12.O-O Bb7 13.Rfd1 Qb6 14.Be5 Rac8 15.Bd4 Qa5 16.a3 Nce4 17.Bd3 h6 18.Qe2 Nxc3 19.Bxc3 Qc7 20.e4 Rfd8 1/2-1/2

Damir lost to NM Jarod John M Pamatmat his last round game, thus violating LM Brian McCarthy’s rule of “Never leave the gym on a missed hoop!”

NM Sanjay Ghatti found that it don’t come easy in Dallas, scoring only 3 points, but hit nothing but net with his last round win over NM Abhishek Reddy Obili.

NM Sanjay Ghatti vs WFM Patrycja Labedz
UT Dallas Fall Fide 2014
Rd 8

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 a6 3.c4 e6 4.d4 cxd4 5.Nxd4 Qc7 6.Nc3 Nf6 7.Bd3 Bb4 8.O-O Nc6 9.Be3 Ne5 10.Rc1 Neg4 11.g3 Nxe3 12.fxe3 b6 13.a3 Bd6 14.Qe2 Bb7 15.b4 h5 16.c5 bxc5 17.bxc5 Be5 18.Na4 h4 19.g4 h3 20.c6 dxc6 21.Kh1 Rh4 22.g5 Nxe4 23.Bxe4 Rxe4 24.Nc5 Rxd4 25.exd4 Bxd4 26.g6 Bxc5 27.gxf7 Ke7 28.Rxc5 Qd6 29.Qf2 Rf8 30.Kg1 e5 31.Rxe5 Qxe5 32.Re1 Qxe1 33.Qxe1 Kxf7 34.Qb4 Bc8 35.Qc4 Kg6 36.Qxc6 Kh7 37.Qc5 Kg8 38.Qd5 Kh8 39.a4 Bf5 40.Qc5 Rf6 41.a5 Kh7 42.Kf2 Be4 43.Kg3 Bg2 44.Qc2 Kg8 45.Qc8 Kh7 1/2-1/2

The fact that three of the four Georgia players faced off against women in round eight illustrates the rise in the number of women players. The total score of the men vs women battle in the penultimate round went to the men, 2-1.

Since there were nine rounds the tale of the tournament can be told by breaking down the results into thirds:

1st 2nd 3rd
Gurevich 1 1/2 2 1 1/2
Corallo 1 1/2 1/2 2 1/2
Studen 1 2 1/2
Ghatti 1 1/2 1 1/2

Now for the conclusion of the FM Daniel Gurevich vs IM Keaton F Kiewra game:

42. Rc6 bxc6 43. b7 Qd8 44. b8=Q f3 45. Bf1 Rf6
46. Qcxe5 Rff8 47. Qc5 h6 48. Ra1 Qf6 49. Qba7 Re4 50. Bd3 Rf4 51. Qce7 Qc3 52.
Bf5 Rg8 53. Qee3 Qb4 54. Qc7 Rxf5 55. gxf5 Bxf5 56. Qcf4 Qb2 57. Qee5 1-0

Were you able to find a better move without checking with your “engine” of choice? Did you “examine all checks?”

Georgians at UT Dallas Fall FIDE Open

FM Gurevich Daniel, NM Damir Studen, NM Michael Corallo, and NM Sanjay Ghatti travelled to Dallas, Texas, to participate in the UT Dallas Fall Fide 2014 chess tournament during the 51st anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, with the Coups d’état taking place in the heart of the city at Dealey Plaza, on Friday, November 22, 1963, a day that will live in infamy.

Georgia players made their presence felt in the first round:

NM Michael P Corallo vs GM Kayden W Troff
UT Dallas Fall Fide 2014
Rd 1

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6.
Bg5 Nbd7 7. Bc4 Qc7 8. Bb3 e6 9. Qd2 Nc5 10. Bxf6 gxf6 11. O-O-O Bd7 12. Qf4
Be7 13. Nf5 exf5 14. Nd5 Qc8 15. Nxe7 Kxe7 16. Qxd6+ Ke8 17. Qxf6 Nxb3+ 18.
axb3 Rg8 19. Qe5+ Kf8 20. Qd6+ Ke8 21. Qe5+ Kf8 22. Qd6+ 1/2 – 1/2

FM Daniel Gurevich vs GM Conrad Holt
UT Dallas Fall Fide 2014
Rd 1

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.exd5 exd5 4.Nf3 Bd6 5.c4 Nf6 6.Nc3 dxc4 7.Bxc4 O-O 8.O-O Nc6 9.h3 h6 10.a3 Bf5 11.Re1 Re8 12.Rxe8 Qxe8 13.Be3 Rd8 14.Qe2 Qd7 15.Rd1 Ne4 16.Nb5 Re8 17.d5 Ne5 18.Nxd6 Nxd6 19.Nxe5 Rxe5 20.Rd4 Qe7 21.g4 Bg6 22.Bd3 Bxd3 23.Qxd3 h5 24.Kg2 hxg4 25.hxg4 Qd7 26.Qd1 Nb5 27.Rd3 Re4 28.f3 Re8 29.d6 Nxd6 30.Bxa7 Qb5 31.Bd4 Nc4 32.a4 Qg5 33.Qc2 Nd6 34.Qd2 Qg6 35.Re3 Rxe3 36.Bxe3 f5 37.Qd5 Kh7 38.Bf4 fxg4 39.Bxd6 cxd6 40.Qxb7 Qc2 41.Kg3 gxf3 42.Qxf3 Qxa4 1/2-1/2

NM Damir Studen v GM Cristhian Cruz
The UT Dallas Fall FIDE Open 2014
Rd 1

1. d4 e6 2. c4 Nf6 3. Nf3 b6 4. g3 Ba6 5. b3 Bb4+ 6. Bd2
Be7 7. Bg2 d5 8. Ne5 c6 9. Bf4 Nfd7 10. Nxd7 Nxd7 11. Nd2 O-O 12. e4 Bb4 13.
Qc2 e5 14. dxe5 dxc4 15. bxc4 Qe7 16. O-O Nxe5 17. Qa4 Nxc4 18. Qxa6 Nxd2 19.
Rfd1 Nxe4 20. Qc4 Nc3 21. Re1 Qc5 22. Qxc5 Bxc5 23. Bxc6 Rad8 24. Be5 Nd5 25.
a3 Ne7 26. Bb5 Rd2 27. Re2 Rfd8 28. Bc3 Rxe2 29. Bxe2 Nc6 30. Bb5 Nd4 31. Bxd4
Rxd4 32. Ra2 g6 33. a4 Kf8 34. Re2 a6 35. Bc6 Rd6 36. Re8+ Kg7 37. Bf3 Kf6 38.
Be2 Rd4 39. Bxa6 Rxa4 40. Be2 Ra2 41. Kf1 b5 42. f4 b4 43. Rb8 Rc2 44. h3 h5
45. Rb7 Ke6 46. Bd3 Rc1+ 47. Ke2 Be7 48. Be4 f5 49. Rb6+ Bd6 50. Bf3 Rc2+ 51.
Kd3 Rh2 52. Kd4 Rxh3 53. Bd5+ Kd7 54. Rb7+ Bc7 55. Kc5 Rxg3 56. Bc6+ Kc8 57.
Rxb4 Rg4 58. Be8 Kd8 59. Bc6 Bxf4 60. Rd4+ Ke7 61. Rd7+ Kf6 62. Kd4 1/2-1/2

Yet another escape from Damir, the Houdini of Georgia chess. He seems to have a penchant for holding a bad position, a good quality to possess.

GM Conrad Holt vs NM Michael P Corallo
The UT Dallas Fall FIDE Open 2014
Rd 2

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.Qc2 O-O 5.e4 d6 6.a3 Bxc3 7.bxc3 c5 8.e5 dxe5 9.dxe5 Ng4 10.f4 f6 11.exf6 Qxf6 12.Bd3 e5 13.Nf3 exf4 14.Bxh7 Kh8 15.O-O Nc6 16.h3 Nh6 17.Bxf4 Qxf4 18.Nh4 Qe3 19.Kh1 Rxf1 20.Rxf1 g6 21.Nxg6 Kg7 22.Nf4 Qe8 23.Bg6 Qe3 24.Nh5 Kh8 25.Rf8 Ng8 26.Rf7 Nh6 27.Rf8 Ng8 28.Rf7 Nh6 29.Rh7 Kg8 30.Qd1 Bxh3 31.Qd5 1-0

FM Daniel Gurevich vs NM Christopher Toolin
The UT Dallas Fall FIDE Open 2014
Rd 3

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nd2 Nf6 4.e5 Nfd7 5.Bd3 c5 6.c3 Nc6 7.Ne2 cxd4 8.cxd4 f6 9.exf6 Nxf6 10.Nf3 Bd6 11.O-O Qc7 12.Bg5 O-O 13.Bh4 g6 14.Bg3 Nh5 15.Bxd6 Qxd6 16.Bb5 Nd8 17.Ne5 Nf7 18.f4 Qb6 19.Qd3 Nd6 20.Ba4 Ne4 21.Bc2 Nhf6 22.g4 Bd7 23.a4 Bc6 24.Rab1 a5 25.Nc3 Rad8 26.Qe3 Nd6 27.Bd3 Nf7 28.h3 Nxe5 29.Qxe5 Rde8 30.Qe3 Qb4 31.Bc2 Nd7 32.Rf3 e5 33.Na2 Qxd4 34.fxe5 Nxe5 35.Rxf8 Rxf8 36.Qxd4 Nf3 37.Kg2 Nxd4 38.Bd1 Ne6 39.b4 d4 40.Kg3 Ng5 41.Rb2 Ne4 42.Kh2 Nc3 43.Bb3 Kg7 44.bxa5 Rf3 45.Nb4 Be4 46.Rd2 d3 47.Bc4 Nb1 48.Rxd3 Bxd3 49.Nxd3 Na3 50.a6 Nxc4 51.axb7 Rf8 52.Nc5 Na5 53.Ne6 Kg8 54.Nxf8 Nxb7 55.Ne6 Kf7 56.Ng5 Kg7 57.Kg3 h6 58.Ne4 Kf7 59.Kf4 1-0

FM Alec Getz vs FM Daniel Gurevich
The UT Dallas Fall FIDE Open 2014
Rd 4

1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 Nc6 3.g3 g6 4.Bg2 Bg7 5.d3 d6 6.Be3 Rb8 7.Nge2 e5 8.Nd5 (TN) Nge7 9.c3 O-O 10.O-O Nxd5 11.exd5 Ne7 12.a3 Nf5 13.Bd2 Bd7 14.b4 b6 15.Qb3 Qc7 16.Rfc1 Rfe8 17.Rab1 h5 18.b5 h4 19.Qc4 h3 20.Bh1 Qd8 21.a4 Bh6 22.Bxh6 Nxh6 23.Rc2 f5 24.Nc1 Qg5 25.Nb3 Ng4 26.Nd2 Re7 27.Re1 Rbe8 28.Qa2 Kg7 29.Nc4 Qf6 30.Rce2 e4 31.dxe4 fxe4 32.Bxe4 Rxe4 33.Rxe4 Qf3 0-1

GM Nadezhda Kosintseva vs NM Sanjay Ghatti
The UT Dallas Fall FIDE Open 2014
Rd 4

1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 c5 4.dxc5 Nc6 5.Nf3 Bg4 6.c3 a6 7.Bf4 (7. Be3 Bxf3 8. Qxf3 Nxe5 9. Qd1 e6 10. Be2 Ne7 11. b4 Nf5 12. Bf4 Nc6 13. O-O g6 14. Bd3 Bg7 15. Bxf5 gxf5 16. Bd6 a5 17. bxa5 Rxa5 18. Nd2 Qd7 19. Nb3 Ra4 20. Nd2 Ra3 21. Rb1 Be5 22. Bxe5 Nxe5 23. Re1 Ng6 24. Qc1 Rxa2 25. Nf3 O-O 26. h4 f6 27. Rb6 e5 28. Qb1 Ra7 29. Rd6 Qc8 30. Rxd5 Ne7 31. Rd6 Qxc5 32. Qb3+ Kh8 33. Rd7 Ng6 34. Qe6 b5 35. Rxa7 Qxa7 36. Qxf5 Qg7 37. Rd1 Nf4 38. g3 Ne2+ 39. Kg2 Qg6 40. Qxg6 hxg6 41. Rd7 Nxc3 42. Rb7 Kg8 43. g4 Rd8 44. h5 g5 45. Nh2 Rd4 46. f3 Rd2+ 47. Kh1 Rb2 48. Nf1 e4 49. fxe4 Nxe4 50. Ne3 Rb3 51. Nd5 Nf2+ 52. Kg1 Nxg4 53. Ne7+ Kf8 54. Nf5 Rh3 55. h6 Nxh6 56. Kg2 g4 57. Nd4 Re3 58. Kf2 Re4 59. Nxb5 Rb4 60. Rh7 Rxb5 61. Rxh6 Kg7 62. Rh4 f5 63. Kg3 Kg6 64. Rh8 Rb3+ 65. Kg2 Kg5 0-1, Tatiana Kosintseva 2515 vs Alexandra Kosteniuk 2495, 63rd ch-RUS w 2013) 7… e6 8.b4 Nge7 9.Bd3 d4 10.h3 (This position was reached in the game Gulruhbegim Tokhirjonova 2126 vs Ekaterina Dyakonova 1928, 2013 WCh U14 Girls when 10 a3 was played-1-0 49) Bxf3 11.Qxf3 dxc3 12.Nxc3 Nxb4 13.Be4 Nec6 14.O-O Nd4 15.Qg4 Nbc6 16.Rfd1 Qc7 17.Bxc6 Nxc6 18.Ne4 h5 19.Qg3 Nb4 20.Nd6 Bxd6 21.cxd6 Qd7 22.Qxg7 O-O-O 23.Rac1 Nc6 24.Qg3 Kb8 25.Qb3 Rc8 26.Be3 b5 27.Bb6 Kb7 28.Bc7 Nxe5 29.Qe3 1-0

NM Damir Studen vs FM Alec Getz
The UT Dallas Fall FIDE Open 2014
Rd 5

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 b6 4.a3 Bb7 5.Nc3 d5 6.cxd5 exd5 7.Bg5 Be7 8.e3 O-O 9.Be2 Nbd7 10.O-O Ne4 11.Bf4 Bd6 12.Bxd6 Nxc3 13.bxc3 cxd6 14.c4 Nf6 1/2-1/2

FM Daniel Gurevich vs GM Cristhian Cruz
UT Dallas Fall Fide 2014
Rd 5

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6.
h3 e6 7. g4 Be7 8. Bg2 Nfd7 9. Be3 Nc6 10. Qe2 O-O 11. O-O-O Nxd4 12. Bxd4 b5
13. e5 d5 14. Nxd5 exd5 15. Bxd5 Rb8 16. Ba7 Rb7 17. Bxb7 Bxb7 18. Rhe1 Qc7 19.
e6 Nf6 20. Bd4 Nd5 21. Qe5 Qxe5 22. Rxe5 f6 23. Ree1 Re8 24. h4 Nf4 25. Bb6 Ng2
26. Rh1 Bc6 27. Rd4 Bf8 28. Rd8 Rxe6 29. Bc5 Be8 30. Bxf8 Kxf8 31. Kd2 Ke7 32.
Rd4 Bc6 33. Rh3 Ne1 34. Rf4 Kd6 35. b3 Ng2 36. Rd4+ Kc5 37. Rd8 Kb6 38. h5 h6
39. Rd4 a5 40. a3 Ne1 41. Rf4 Ng2 42. Rd4 Ne1 43. Rf4 Ng2 1/2-1/2

After five rounds FM Gurevich has 3 points; NMs Corallo and Studen have 2 points; and NM Ghatti has 1 1/2 points. Round 6 will be contested tonight, Monday, November 24, 5:00 p.m, CST. (http://www.utdallas.edu/chess/chess-team/fall-fide-open-2014.html)

Draw Eliminates Kings from Playoffs

The Atlanta Kings season ended last night when, needing a win, they could only manage a draw with the Sharks of Miami. The Kings were eliminated from the playoffs.

Week 10: Miami Sharks (MIA 2406) vs Atlanta Kings (ATL 2405)

​Tuesday, October 28, 7:40pm

1. GM Julio Becerra (MIA 2626) – Deepak Aaron (ATL 2446) 1/2

2. ​FM Kazim Gulamali (ATL 2397) – FM Marcel Martinez (MIA 2474) 0-1

3. Federico Gonzalez (MIA 2315) – FM Daniel Gurevich (ATL 2393) 1/2

​4. Richard Francisco ​(ATL 2382) – Oscar Maldonado (MIA 2209) ​1-0

Match Tied 2-2

Becerra,Julio (2626) – Aaron,Deepak (2446) [C78]
USCL Week 10 Internet Chess Club, 28.10.2014

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 b5 6.Bb3 Bc5 7.a4 Rb8 8.axb5 axb5 9.c3 d6 10.d4 Bb6 11.Na3 Bg4 12.Nxb5 0-0 13.Be3 d5 14.exd5 Nxd5 15.Bg5 Bxf3 16.Qxf3 Qxg5 17.Bxd5 Ne7 18.Bc4 exd4 19.Nxd4 Ng6 20.Nc6 Rbe8 21.Rfe1 Nh4 22.Qd5 Qf6 23.Kh1 g6 24.f4 Rxe1+ 25.Rxe1 Nf5 26.g3 Ne3 27.Qe4 Ng4 28.Kg2 Qd6 29.Ne7+ Kg7 30.Nd5 Nf6 31.Nxf6 Qxf6 32.Rd1 Rd8 33.Rxd8 Qxd8 34.Bd5 c5 35.Qe5+ Qf6 36.Kf3 Qxe5 37.fxe5 f5 38.Ke2 Bc7 39.e6 Kf6 40.Kd3 Ke7 41.Kc4 Bd6 42.Kb5 h5 43.Kc4 g5 44.Kd3 h4 45.gxh4 gxh4 46.h3 Kf6 47.Kc4 Ke7 48.Kb5 Kf6 49.Kc6 Be7 50.Bc4 Bf8 51.Kd7 Be7 52.Be2 Bf8 53.Bd3 f4 54.Be2 Be7 55.Bg4 Bf8 56.Bf3 Be7 57.Bd5 Bf8 58.Bf3 Be7 59.Bd5 1/2-1/2

Gulamali,Kazim (2397) – Martinez,Marcel (2474) [D18]
USCL Week 10 Internet Chess Club, 28.10.2014

1.Nf3 Nf6 2.c4 c6 3.d4 d5 4.Nc3 dxc4 5.a4 Bf5 6.e3 e6 7.Bxc4 Bb4 8.0-0 0-0 9.Ne5 Nbd7 10.Qb3 a5 11.Nxd7 Qxd7 12.Rd1 Qe7 13.f3 e5 14.e4 Bg6 15.Be3 Rfd8 16.d5 Bc5 17.Bxc5 Qxc5+ 18.Kh1 h5 19.Rd3 h4 20.Rf1 Rac8 21.Qa2 Qb4 22.b3 Nh5 23.Qf2 Nf4 24.Re3 Qc5 25.g3 Nh5 26.Kg2 Qe7 27.Kh1 Rd6 28.Ree1 hxg3 29.hxg3 Bh7 30.Rg1 Qg5 31.Rg2 Rg6 32.Reg1 Qh6 33.Rh2 Qg5 34.Rh3 Rh6 35.Kh2 Rd8 36.f4 Qe7 37.f5 Qg5 38.Kg2 Nf4+ 0-1

Gonzalez,Federico (2315) – Gurevich,Daniel (2393) [B30]
USCL Week 10 Internet Chess Club, 28.10.2014

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.c3 Nf6 4.e5 Nd5 5.d4 cxd4 6.cxd4 d6 7.Nc3 dxe5 8.Nxe5 Nxc3 9.Nxc6 Nxd1 10.Nxd8 Kxd8 11.Kxd1 Be6 12.Bd3 Bd5 13.f3 e6 14.Bf4 Rc8 15.Ke2 Kd7 16.Rhc1 Bd6 17.Bxd6 Kxd6 18.a3 h6 19.Ke3 g5 20.Rc3 Rxc3 21.bxc3 Rc8 22.Kd2 f5 23.h4 f4 24.hxg5 hxg5 25.Rh1 g4 26.Be4 gxf3 27.gxf3 Bxe4 28.fxe4 Rg8 29.Rh6 Rg2+ 30.Kd3 Rg3+ 31.Kc4 b5+ 32.Kxb5 Re3 33.e5+ Kd5 34.Kb4 f3 35.Rf6 Ke4 36.Kc4 a6 37.Rf8 Re1 38.d5 exd5+ 39.Kc5 f2 40.e6 Kd3 41.Rxf2 Rxe6 42.Kxd5 Re8 43.Rf3+ Kc2 44.c4 Rd8+ 45.Kc5 Rc8+ 46.Kb4 Rb8+ 47.Ka5 Rc8 48.Rf4 Rc6 49.Kb4 Rb6+ 50.Kc5 Rb8 51.Kd6 Kb3 52.c5 Kxa3 53.c6 a5 54.c7 Rc8 55.Kd7 Rh8 56.c8Q Rxc8 57.Kxc8 a4 58.Kb7 Kb3 59.Kb6 a3 60.Kb5 a2 61.Rf1 Kb2 62.Kb4 a1Q 63.Rf2+ Kc1 64.Rf1+ Kb2 65.Rxa1 Kxa1 1/2-1/2

Francisco,Richard (2382) – Maldonado,Oscar (2209) [B30]
USCL Week 10 Internet Chess Club, 28.10.2014

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Bxc6 dxc6 5.d3 Bg4 6.Be3 e5 7.h3 Bxf3 8.Qxf3 Nf6 9.Nd2 Nd7 10.Qg3 Qf6 11.0-0 Qg6 12.Qh2 Be7 13.Nc4 Qe6 14.f4 exf4 15.Bxf4 0-0 16.a4 b5 17.Ne3 c4 18.Nf5 Bf6 19.Qg3 Ne5 20.Nd4 Qe7 21.Nf5 Qe6 22.Bg5 Bxg5 23.Qxg5 Ng6 24.h4 Qd7 25.Qg4 Qa7+ 26.d4 f6 27.Kh1 Rad8 28.h5 Kf7 29.c3 Ne7 30.Qxg7+ Ke8 31.axb5 cxb5 32.Rxa6 Qb7 33.Nd6+ Rxd6 34.Rxd6 Qxe4 35.Rd8+ Kxd8 36.Qxf8+ Kd7 37.Qxf6 Qe2 38.Qf3 Qxb2 39.Qb7+ Ke8 40.Re1 Qa3 41.Qxb5+ Kf7 42.Qxc4+ Kg7 43.Qb4 Qxb4 44.cxb4 Nd5 45.b5 Kf6 46.Re5 Nb6 47.Rc5 Ke7 48.Rc6 Nd5 49.b6 Kd7 50.b7 Kxc6 51.b8Q Nb6 52.Qe5 Nd5 53.Qe6+ Kc7 54.Qxd5 Kc8 55.Qf7 Kb8 56.Qxh7 Kc8 57.Qg7 Kb8 58.h6 Ka8 59.h7 1-0

Because of the rating cap it is difficult to take the USCL seriously. Each team must have an average rating of 2400 except when, “3. Any player rated above 2600 will count as only 2600 when determining whether a lineup has a legal average; this is done to reward teams for using the strongest players in the country on their rosters.” Or when, “4. Any player rated below 2000 will count as 2000 when determining whether a lineup has a legal average; this is done to keep lineups reasonably balanced.” (http://uschessleague.com/rules.php)

This makes no sense whatsoever. When the Kings played the St. Louis Arch Bishops GM Wesley So, the number ten player in the world, was rated 2751, yet for USCL purposes his rating was considered to be 2600. Theoretically, a team could field three 2700 players and an 1800 on last board under USCL rules. If the 2700 rated players were actually considered to be 2700, then the last board would have to be manned by a player rated 1500. This obviously greatly favors teams fortunate enough to have players rated over 2600, lessening the chance an underdog team has of making the playoffs. Like the tax laws in this country favoring the wealthy and corporations, now considered “people” under the law (http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2014/07/how-supreme-court-turned-corporations-people-200-year-saga) & (http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/jurisprudence/2014/03/corporations_are_people_and_that_s_why_hobby_lobby_should_lose_at_the_supreme.html), USCL rules favor the teams rich in higher rated players. Unless and until the rules are changed the USCL has little credibility.

The Kings were led this season by NM Richard Francisco, who scored an amazing 7 1/2 out of 9 games. The Frisco Kid played 3 games more than any other player, and scored an astounding 4 1/2 more points than the second highest scoring player, NM Damir Studen. He also had the highest PR. If a team MVP is chosen, Mr. Francisco is the man.

1. GM Alonso Zapata 2555 – 1.0/3 (2518 PR)

2. Deepak Aaron 2446 – 1.5/5 (2309 PR)

​3. IM Carlos Perdomo 2400 – 1.5/3​ (2524 PR)

4. FM Kazim Gulamali 2397 – 0.5/4​ (2172 PR)

​5. FM Daniel Gurevich 2393 – 1.5/3 (2412 PR)

​6. Richard Francisco 2382 – 7.5/9​ (2531 PR)​

​7. Damir Studen 2372 – 3.0/6 (2439 PR)

8. Michael Corallo 2284 – 1.0/2 (2115 PR)

9. Leonardo Martinez 2266 – 2.0/3 (2395 PR)

​10. Sanjay Ghatti 2245 – 0.0/1 (1870 PR)

11. Lawrence White 2179 – 0.5/1 (2074 PR)
(http://www.southeastchess.com/atlanta-kings.html)

Get Smart: Missed it by that much

US Masters: All Over But The Shouting

The grueling ordeal that is the US Masters came to an end last night with GM Bartlomiej Macieja alone in first place at +6 while winning $5000. GM Yaroslav Zherebukh in second place at +5 and took home $3000. Six players tied for third at +4. They each won $850. If you think this a tremendous disparity between first and third, the winner of the ongoing Sinquefield Cup will win $100,000. It pays to be at the top.
GM Alonso Zapata drew with Damir Studen in the last round with both finishing with a +1 score of 5-4. Damir took home $114.29 as second U2300 while the GM went home empty-handed.

Michael Corallo drew his last game with Vladimir Romankenko to also finish at +1 and also won $114.29. IM Carlos Perdomo also finished with a +1 score, but took home only $75 after his last round draw with Nicolas D Checa.

Sanjay Ghatti lost in the last round to Gabriel Petesch to finish at -1, with a score, but yet took home 266.67 for the 2nd U2100. As is often the case in tournament chess it often pays to be a lower rated player.

The Frisco Kid, Richard Francisco, showing great fighting spirit when those around him were doing the “buddy-buddy shake,” won his last round game against Sam Copeland to finish with an even score and took home that home as consolation.

Michael Corallo (2300) vs Vladimir Romankenko (2548)
USM Rd 9
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 d6 6. Bg5 e6 7. Qd2 a6 8. O-O-O Bd7 9. f3 Be7 10. h4 h6 11. Be3 b5 12. Nxc6 Bxc6 13. Kb1 Qc7 14. Ne2 d5 15. e5 Nd7 16. f4 Nc5 17. Bxc5 Bxc5 18. Nd4 Bd7 19. g4 O-O-O 20. h5 Kb7 21. Bg2 Ka7 22. Rhe1 Qb6 23. Nb3 Be7 24. Rh1 Rc8 1/2-1/2

Richard Francisco (2382) vs Sam Copeland (2302)
USM Rd 9
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 f5 4. d3 fxe4 5. dxe4 Nf6 6. Be3 Nxe4 7. O-O d6 8. Qd3 Bf5 9. Ng5 Nxg5 10. Qxf5 Be7 11. Bxg5 Bxg5 12. Qf3 h5 13. Bxc6 bxc6 14. Qxc6 Kf7 15. Nc3 Kg6 16. Rae1 Kh7 17. Nd5 Rc8 18. g3 Qe8 19. Qa6 c6 20. Nc3 Rc7 21. f4 Bd8 22. fxe5 dxe5 23. Qd3 Qg6 24. Rf5 Kh6 25. Rexe5 Bf6 26. Qe3 1-0

I was able to provide most of these games because I transcribed them myself, and enjoyed replaying them immensely. Unfortunately, the scoresheets for most of the last round games have not been provided on the website (http://www.carolinaschessinitiative.com/tournaments/US-Masters-NC-Open-2014/)
The disparity between the ratings shown is because the USCF rating is different, and usually higher, than the FIDE rating.

Shout – Otis Day & The Knights (Animal House 1978)

The Isley Brothers – Shout

What Was Kazim Thinking?

It was a brutal penultimate round for the intrepid players from Georgia. GM Zapata managed to draw his game with Levy Rozman (2287), as did IM Carlos Perdomo, who drew with Alexander Betaneli (2246). Damir Studen also drew his game with IM John Cox (2371) from the United Kingdom.

Damir Studen (2264) vs IM John Cox (2371)
1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Nf3 dxc4 5. a4 Bf5 6. Ne5 Nbd7 7. Nxc4 Qc7 8. g3 e5 9. dxe5 Nxe5 10. Bf4 Nfd7 11. Qd4 f6 12. Rd1 g5 13. Bxe5 fxe5 14. Qe3 Be6 15. Nd2 h6 16. Nde4 Qb6 17. Qd3 O-O-O 18. Bg2 Nc5 19. Qxd8 Qxd8 20. Rxd8 Kxd8 21. Nxc5 Bxc5 22. Kd2 Bb3 23. Be4 Ke7 24. f3 Rd8 25. Bd3 a5 26. h4 Kd7 27. hxg5 hxg5 28. Rh7 Kc8 29. Rg7 Bf8 30. Rh7 Bb4 31. Rg7 Bxa4 32. Rxg5 e4 33. fxe4 Bb3 34. Kc1 Rh8 35. Bc2 Rh1 36. Kd2 Bf8 37. Rxa5 Bh6 38. Kd3 Be6 39. Ra8 Kd7 40. Rh8 b5 41. b3 Kd6 42. Nd1 Rh3 43. e3 Rh2 44. Nc3 Kc5 45. e5 Bf5 46. Ne4 Kb4 47. Bd1 Rh3 48. Bf3 Be6 49. g4 Rh4 50. Nd2 c5 51. Rh7 1/2-1/2

Unfortunately Michael Corallo lost again, this time to GM Elshan Moradiabad (2598). Michael had been having such a tremendous tournament that after losing back to back games he is still tied at +1, or 4 1/2 points, with those above named players, and will battle another GM, Vladimir Romanenko (2498) in the money round.

Sanjay Ghatti lost to Andrey Gorovets (2478) but still has an even score with 4 points.

Sanjay Ghatti (2024) vs Andrey Gorovets (2478)
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Qb6 5. Nb3 Nf6 6. Nc3 e6 7. Be3 Qc7 8. Be2 Bb4 9. f3 d5 10. O-O Bxc3 11. bxc3 dxe4 12. fxe4 Nxe4 13. Qd3 f5 14. Nc5 Nf6 15. Qc4 Nd5 16. Bf4 Nxf4 17. Rxf4 Ne5 18. Qa4 Kf7 19. Ne4 Qb6 20. Qd4 Rd8 21. Ng5 Kg6 22. Qxb6 axb6 23. Nf3 Nxf3 24. Bxf3 Kf6 25. Rb4 Rd6 26. a4 Bd7 27. Bxb7 Ra7 28. Bf3 b5 29. c4 Rxa4 30. Raxa4 bxa4 31. c5 a3 32. Rb1 a2 33. Ra1 Ra6 34. Bb7 Ra7 35. c6 Ke7 36. cxd7 Rxb7 37. Rxa2 Rxd7 38. c4 Kd6 39. Ra6 Ke5 40. Rc6 g5 41. Kf2 Rd2 42. Kf3 h5 43. h3 g4 44. hxg4 hxg4 45. Kg3 f4 46. Kxg4 Rxg2 47. Kf3 Rg3 48. Kf2 Rc3 49. Ke2 Re3 50. Kf2 Kd4 51. Rc8 Rc3 52. Re8 e5 0-1

The Frisco Kid drew with Joshua Colas (2116) and is at -1, with 3 1/2 points, needing a win tonight against Sam Copeland (2153) to finish with an even score.

Kazim Gulamali lost his penultimate round game and also has 3 1/2 points.

Nicolas D Checa (2219) vs FM Kazim Gulamali (2283)

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 dxc4 5. e3 a6 6. a4 c5 7. Bxc4 cxd4

The game ended here and this was displayed on the website:
“White won (rated game). Cellphone went off”

It is beyond my comprehension how such a thing could occur. Why any player would even have a cellphone after what happened to GM Nigel Short when he lost a game, even though his gizmo was turned off, because it made a sound to signal its battery was low, disrupting the tournament, and violating the FIDE rule against gizmos making sounds. No players should ever, under any circumstance, have a gizmo with them in or around the tournament hall because of the appearance of having such device gives because of the possibility of cheating by using a gizmo. All chess organizations should have banned gizmos years ago for just this reason. Please do not misunderstand me. I am not, and would never accuse Kazim of cheating. Having known him for at least a decade I would not believe it if he were ever accused of cheating because he is a gentleman. I hate to write this, but his play this tournament could be considered prima-facie evidence that he did not cheat. It is more than a little obvious that Kazim had what is now called a “Dierks” moment.

Reece Thompson lost in the penultimate round and still has 3 points, but will play the last round game trying to finish with a -1 score.

Kapil Chandran (2382) vs Reece Thompson (2087)

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 d6 3. Nf3 Nbd7 4. Nc3 c6 5. e4 e5 6. Be2 Be7 7. O-O O-O 8. Qc2 Re8 9. d5 a5 10. h3 Qc7 11. Be3 Nc5 12. Rfd1 Bd7 13. Rac1 cxd5 14. cxd5 Rec8 15. Nd2 Qb8 16. Bxc5 Rxc5 17. a4 Be8 18. Qb1 Nd7 19. Nb3 Rc8 20. Nb5 Rxc1 21. Rxc1 Bd8 22. Qc2 Bg5 23. Nc7 Bxc1 24. Nxa8 Be3 25. fxe3 Qxa8 26. Qc7 Qa7 27. Kf2 Nf6 28. Qd8 h6 29. Bb5 Kh7 30. Bxe8 Nxe4 31. Kf3 f5 32. Bd7 1-0
The schedule has been brutal as can be seen by the fact that 30% of the field will not play in the last round. The ones who do play will certainly be staggering at the finish line.

Dierks Bentley – What Was I Thinkin