The Colorado Counter

Over half a century playing Chess and this was the first time I can recall seeing the Colorado Counter, proving that Chess really “is a sea where a gnat may drink from and an elephant may bathe in.”

Colorado Gambit

Alois Lanc (2268) vs Paolo Tocco (2033)
30th World Senior Chess Championship 2022 (Assisi (ITA))
B00 KP, Colorado counter

1.e4 Nc6 2.Nf3 f5 3.exf5 d5 4.Bb5 Bxf5 5.d4 e6 6.O-O Bd6 7.c4 dxc4 8.Nc3 Nge7 9.Re1 O-O 10.Bxc4 Qd7 11.Qe2 Nd8 12.h3 Nec6 13.a3 Kh8 14.g4 Bg6 15.Be3 e5 16.dxe5 Nxe5 17.Nxe5 Bxe5 18.Rad1 Qc6 19.Bd5 Qf6 20.Bg2 Ne6 21.Nd5 Qh4 22.Rf1 Bd6 23.f4 Rae8 24.Qd2 Nc5 25.Bf2 Qd8 26.f5 Bf7 27.Nc3 Bb3 28.f6 gxf6 29.Bd4 Bxd1 0-1

Tobias Baerwinkel vs Thomas Becker (2220)
Event: Oberliga Sued W 9697
Site: Germany Date: ??/??/1997
Round: ?
B00 KP, Colorado counter
30th World Senior Chess Championship 2022 (Assisi (ITA)), 19.11.2022

1.e4 Nc6 2.Nf3 f5 3.exf5 d5 4.Bb5 Bxf5 5.d4 e6 6.O-O Bd6 7.c4 dxc4 8.Nc3 Nge7 9.Re1 O-O 10.Bxc4 Qd7 11.Qe2 Nd8 12.h3 Nec6 13.a3 Kh8 14.g4 Bg6 15.Be3 e5 16.dxe5 Nxe5 17.Nxe5 Bxe5 18.Rad1 Qc6 19.Bd5 Qf6 20.Bg2 Ne6 21.Nd5 Qh4 22.Rf1 Bd6 23.f4 Rae8 24.Qd2 Nc5 25.Bf2 Qd8 26.f5 Bf7 27.Nc3 Bb3 28.f6 gxf6 29.Bd4 Bxd1 0-1
1.e4 Nc6 2.Nf3 f5 3.exf5 d5 4.d4 Bxf5 5.Bb5 e6 6.O-O Bd6 7.c4 dxc4 8.Re1 Nf6 9.Bxc4 Qd7 10.d5 O-O-O 11.Nc3 exd5 12.Bb5 d4 13.Ne2 d3 14.Ned4 Bxh2+ 15.Kf1 Qd5 16.Qa4 d2 17.Bxd2 Rd6 18.Nxf5 Qxf5 19.Bc3 Qc5 20.Qc4 ½-½
https://www.365chess.com/game.php?back=1&gid=1088732&m=15

From the above results one would think maybe there was something to the Colorado Gambit, but if so, why was this writer unaware of its potency? It was late at night when first reviewing the game, so I decided to input the first two moves into the analysis program at Lichess.com just for the hellofit, and sat there way past bedtime watching the game unfold. The result was a surprise, to say the least…

11/20/22

  1. e4 Nc6 2. Nf3 f5 3. exf5 d5 4. d4 Bxf5 5. Bb5 e6 6. O-O Bd6 7. c4 dxc4 8. Re1 Ne7 9. Nc3 O-O 10. Bxc4 Qd7 11. Qb3 Rae8 12. Bd2 Kh8 13. Ne4 h6 14. Ng3 Nd5 15. Nxf5 Rxf5 16. Qd3 Rf6 17. Re4 Ref8 18. Rae1 Bf4 19. Bc3 Bd6 20. Rh4 Nce7 21. Bb3 Rxf3 22. gxf3 Nf5 23. Rg4 Qf7 24. Bc2 Qh5 25. h4 Nf6 26. Ree4 c6 27. Bb3 Nxe4 28. Qxe4 Be7 29. Kf1 Bf6 30. Bxe6 Nxh4 31. a4 Rd8 32. a5 Qb5+ 33. Kg1 h5 34. Rg3 Re8 35. b3 Re7 36. Bd2 g6 37. Bc4 Qf5 38. Qxf5 gxf5 39. Rh3 Kg7 40. Rg3+ Kh8 41. Rh3 b5 42. Bd3 a6 43. Be3 Rd7 44. Bxf5 Nxf5 45. Rxh5+ Kg7 46. Rxf5 Rd5 47. Rf4 b4 48. Bd2 Rxa5 49. Bxb4 Rb5 50. Bf8+ Kg6 51. b4 Bg5 52. Re4 Bd2 53. Bc5 Kf6 54. Re5 Bxb4 55. Bxb4 Rxb4 56. Rc5 Rb6 57. Kf1 Ke7 58. Ke2 Kd6 59. Ra5 Rb5 60. Rxa6 Kd5 61. f4 Kxd4 62. Rxc6 Ke4 63. Rc4+ Kf5

What seems a lifetime ago a fellow high school classmate who lived up the street, Jesse Pettit, said, “The way you feel about Bob Dylan is how I feel about John Denver.” This one is dedicated to Jesse.

Playing To Win With The Dutch At The New York Fall Invitational Drawfest

In a Chess tournament replete with myriad short draws there were players who played to win by moving the f-pawn two squares with the opening move after white opens with 1 d4, or 1 c4, or 1 Nf3, etc. This signifies the Dutch Defense. Unfortunately, both games ended in a draw, as do most Chess games these daze. Even more disconcerting was what is written after the opening moves of 1 d4 f5 in the Xie vs La Manna game at Lichess.com, where one finds after 1…f5, “Inaccuracy. Nf6 was best.” The oracles have determined what constitutes best play in the opening and such a risky move is now frowned upon. The programs have made the openings homogeneous. Where is the fun in that? It has made play at the top level boring. The time has come to chose random openings prior to the round. Think of it, no more being booked up like Zook the Book (https://alt.chess.narkive.com/V3QAMUqo/my-wikipedia-biography-of-bernard-zuckerman).

https://njjewishnews.timesofisrael.com/bernard-zuckerman/

No more having to memorize the opening moves deep into the middle game, or even into the endgame. If Chess is to survive it will have to either use random openings chosen prior to the game or some kind of randomized Chess such as what has come to be called “Fischer Random Chess,” or even better, Armchair Warrior Random Chess (https://xpertchesslessons.wordpress.com/2022/11/01/armchair-warrior-random-chess/).

Farai Mandizha (2359) vs Djurabek Khamrakulov (2490)
2022 New York Fall Invitational GM B (Long Island City, NY), 13.11.2022
Rd 8

1.d4 f5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 g6 4.c3 c6 5.Nf3 Bg7 6.Qb3 e6 7.O-O O-O 8.Bf4 d6 9.Qa3 Ne8 10.Nbd2 Rf7 11.e4 h6 12.exf5 exf5 13.h4 Be6 1/2-1/2

Michael Shepherd vs Paul J Benson (2011)
Event: Monarch Assurance 9th
Site: Port Erin Date: 10/22/2000
Round: 9
ECO: A81 Dutch defence
1.d4 f5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 g6 4.c3 c6 5.Nf3 Bg7 6.O-O d6 7.Nbd2 Nbd7 8.e4 Nxe4 9.Nxe4 fxe4 10.Ng5 Nf6 11.Nxe4 Nxe4 12.Bxe4 O-O 13.Bg5 Qc7 14.Re1 e5 15.dxe5 Bxe5 16.Bh6 Re8 17.f4 Bg7 18.Bd5+ Kf8 19.Qd4 cxd5 20.Qf6+ Qf7 21.Rxe8+ Kxe8 22.Re1+ Kf8 23.Qd8+ 1-0
https://www.365chess.com/game.php?back=1&gid=670748&m=10

Bryan Xie (2133) vs Andrea La Manna (2297)
2022 New York Fall Invitational IM C (Long Island City, NY), 13.11.2022
Rd 8

1.d4 f5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bg5 d5 4.Bxf6 exf6 5.e3 Be6 6.Bd3 Qd7 7.Qf3 Nc6 8.a3 Ne7 9.Nge2 c6 10.h3 h5 11.O-O-O Nc8 12.Rhg1 Nd6 13.Nf4 Bf7 14.g4 hxg4 15.hxg4 g5 16.Nfe2 O-O-O 17.Rh1 Rxh1 18.Rxh1 fxg4 19.Qxf6 Qe7 20.Qxe7 Bxe7 21.Rh7 Kd7 22.Ng3 Bg8 23.Rh2 Be6 24.Rh7 Rf8 25.Nd1 Nf5 26.Nxf5 Bxf5 27.Bxf5+ Rxf5 28.Rh2 Bd6 29.Rg2 g3 30.fxg3 g4 31.Nf2 Bxg3 32.Nxg4 Bd6 33.Nf2 Rf7 34.Nd3 Kc7 35.Kd2 b5 36.b4 Re7 37.Rg6 Rh7 38.Kc3 Re7 39.Kd2 Rh7 40.Nc5 Re7 41.Kd3 Rh7 42.Rg8 Re7 43.Ra8 Kb6 44.Rh8 Kc7 45.Rg8 Bxc5 46.dxc5 Kb7 47.Rg4 Kc7 48.Kd4 Kb7 49.e4 dxe4 50.Rxe4 Rh7 51.Ke5 Kc7 52.Rg4 Re7+ 53.Kf6 Re2 54.Rg7+ Kc8 55.Rxa7 Rxc2 56.Ke6 Rd2 57.Rh7 Rd3 58.Rg7 Rd1 59.Ra7 Rd3 60.a4 bxa4 61.Rxa4 Rd4 62.Ra7 Rd1 63.Rg7 Rd4 64.Rh7 Rd1 65.Rh3 Kc7 66.Ke5 Rd5+ 67.Ke4 Rd1 68.Rd3 Rb1 69.Rd4 Rb2 70.Kd3 Rb1 71.Kc4 Rc1+ 72.Kb3 Rb1+ 73.Kc2 Rh1 74.Rg4 Rh3 1/2-1/2
https://lichess.org/broadcast/2022-new-york-fall-invitational–im-c/round-8/ITeocPRQ

1.d4 f5 2.Nc3 (c4) Nf6 3.Bg5 d5 4.Bxf6 exf6 5.e3 Be6 6.Bd3 Qd7 7.Qf3 (a3) Nc6 8.a3 (Nge2) Ne7 (0-0-0) 9.Nge2 (h4) c6 (0-0-0) 10.h3 (Nh5) h5 11.O-O-O (h4) Nc8 12.Rhg1 (Nf4) Nd6 13.Nf4 Bf7 14.g4 hxg4 (fxg4) 15.hxg4 g5 (fxg4) 16.Nfe2 O-O-O 17.Rh1 Rxh1 18.Rxh1 fxg4 (Be6)

Drazen Muse (2328) vs Sandro Safar (2240)
Event: 29th TCh-CRO Div 1b 2021
Site: Mali Losinj CRO Date: 09/25/2021
Round: 1.4
ECO: A80 Dutch

1.d4 f5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bg5 d5 4.Bxf6 exf6 5.e3 Be6 6.Bd3 Nc6 7.a3 Qd7 8.Qf3 Ne7 9.Nge2 c6 10.h3 h5 11.O-O-O b5 12.Rdg1 Rh6 13.Nf4 Bf7 14.Be2 Nc8 15.g4 Nb6 16.gxf5 a5 17.e4 b4 18.Nb1 O-O-O 19.axb4 axb4 20.Ng6 Bd6 21.e5 Bxg6 22.Rxg6 Rxg6 23.fxg6 fxe5 24.Qxh5 Qc7 25.Qg4+ Kb7 26.dxe5 Bxe5 27.Qxb4 Bd6 28.Qb3 Re8 29.Re1 Bf4+ 30.Kd1 Re4 31.Nc3 Rd4+ 32.Bd3 Bg5 33.Qa2 Nc4 34.Re8 Na5 35.Ne2 Rb4 36.c3 Rb6 37.Qxa5 Bd8 38.Rf8 Qd6 39.Rf7+ Bc7 40.b4 Qe5 41.Qc5 Qh2 42.Qe7 Kb8 43.Rf8+ Ka7 44.Rc8 Rb7 45.Qc5+ Bb6 46.Qxc6 Qh1+ 47.Kd2 Qa1 48.Qe8 Qb2+ 49.Kd1 Rc7 50.Qa4+ 1-0
https://www.365chess.com/game.php?back=1&gid=4307799&m=20

Dedicated to Dirk Jan ten Geuzendam and everyone at New In Chess magazine, still, according to the website, The premier chess magazine in the world.

Winning, Losing, And The Psychology of Chess

Because it has become so difficult to win a Chess game in Grandmaster tournaments these days a loss in the first round can be devastating. In the first round of the recently completed 2022 Fall Chess Classic B, held at the St. Louis Chess Campus, GM Ioan-Cristian Chirila

Pawn broker // Show Me Mizzou // University of Missouri
showme.missouri.edu

had the black pieces against GM Tigran K. Harutyunyan.

Harutyunyan wins Georgian Chess Club Championship – Sport.mediamax.am
sport.mediamax.am

As it turned out the game was one of, if not the most interesting game of the event.

Position after 39…Bxe4 with White to move.

There had already been a few twists and turns in the game at this point, but this is where the fun really begins. We will move along to a later position:

Position after 51 Rec1 with Black to move

The 51st move made by White was not good. Prior to the move Black was much better but now he is winning. The hardest game to win is a won game. What move would you make?

Position after 55 Qc3 with Black to move.

As Robert Zimmerman sang, things have changed. I’ll say! The black advantage has dissipated and it is now an even game, according to the Stockfish program at Lichess.com. The move that should be made looks rather obvious, but then we are not at the board with the clock ticking…

I will leave the remainder of the game for your amusement…

[Event “St Louis Fall B 2022”]
[Site “Saint Louis USA”]
[Date “2022.11.02”]
[Round “1.1”]
[White “Harutyunyan, Tigran K.”]
[Black “Chirila, Ioan-Cristian”]
[WhiteElo “2504”]
[BlackElo “2536”]
[ECO “A15”]
[Opening “English opening”]

  1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 c5 3. e3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. Bb5+ Bd7 6. Bc4 Nb6 7. Be2 Nc6 8.
    O-O e5 9. d3 Be7 10. Nbd2 O-O 11. b3 Re8 12. Bb2 Bf8 13. Rc1 Nd5 14. Qc2 b6 15.
    Qb1 Qc7 16. Rfe1 Qb7 17. a3 Rad8 18. Qa2 Nc7 19. Qa1 f6 20. Qb1 Nd5 21. Bd1 Be6
  2. Bc2 g6 23. Qa1 Bf7 24. Ne4 Bg7 25. Ng3 Rc8 26. h4 Qd7 27. h5 Qg4 28. Bd1 Qd7
  3. Qb1 a5 30. Be2 g5 31. Bd1 h6 32. Nh2 Nde7 33. e4 Rcd8 34. Re3 Be6 35. Bc3 f5
  4. exf5 Nxf5 37. Nxf5 Bxf5 38. Bf3 Nd4 39. Be4 Bxe4 40. dxe4 Qf7 41. b4 axb4
  5. axb4 c4 43. Nf1 Rf8 44. Qb2 Qxh5 45. b5 Qe8 46. Ng3 h5 47. Bb4 Qxb5 48. Nxh5
    Rf7 49. Nxg7 Kxg7 50. Qc3 Rc8 51. Rce1 Kg6 52. Rg3 Qd7 53. Qe3 Rf4 54. Bd2 g4
  6. Qc3 Kg5 56. f3 Kf6 57. Bxf4 exf4 58. Rxg4 b5 59. Rxf4+ Ke6 60. Rh4 Qg7 61.
    Qe3 c3 62. e5 Nc6 63. Qxc3 Qa7+ 64. Kh2 Qf2 65. Qb3+ 1-0

It is always difficult to lose a Chess game, especially when that game is the first game of a tournament. When one has a winning advantage, and blows it, how it affects a player is exacerbated. To the male psyche it can be devastating. After losing a won game one is often told to “Put it out of your mind.” That is something easier said than done. It is also difficult to sleep the night after a loss, which will have a deleterious effect on play later in the tournament. Only the strong survive, and only the exceptionally strong comeback for such a devastating loss. GM Chirila is one of those players because he returned from the dead to tie for third place in the event while having the third highest performance rating to show for it. He sort of stabilized himself with a draw with the white pieces in round two, but let go of the rope again against with the black pieces versus young Christopher Yoo in round three. With only one half point after the first three rounds some, if not most, players would go into the tank and be happy to, hopefully, make a few draws while playing out the string. Christian Chirila is not one of those players. He defeated the eventual winner of the tournament, Aleksandr Linderman,

The Lenderman Method – GM Aleksandr Lenderman
thechessworld.com

with the black pieces in the final round. Lindy ran away with the tournament by scoring 6 1/2 points to finish one point in front of the second place finisher, GM Raunak Sadhwani, from India. I cannot count the number of times a player who had an insurmountable lead lost in the last round. It happens so frequently that it would seem to be better if the player who has already clinched first place would simply refuse to play the meaningless last round game. Nevertheless, my hat is off to both of these players, especially Chirila, for showing his measure as a player and as a man. Even with the last round loss, the winner, Lucky Lindy, over performed his rating by 167. The number two player was Christian Chirila, who finished with a performance rating of 2596, which is 60 points more than his rating.

The other game being presented was played in the first round and the opening was one of my favorite openings, “The truth as it was known in those long ago days.” Christopher, I love Yoo, Man!

[Event “St Louis Fall B 2022”]
[Site “Saint Louis USA”]
[Date “2022.11.02”]
[Round “1.2”]
[White “Yoo, Christopher Woojin”]
[Black “Jacobson, Brandon”]
[WhiteElo “2573”]
[BlackElo “2551”]
[ECO “C24”]
[Opening “Bishop’s opening”]

  1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 Nf6 3. d3 Bc5 4. Nc3 O-O 5. Nf3 d6 6. Na4 Bb6 7. O-O h6 8. b4
    Re8 9. Bb2 Nc6 10. Nxb6 axb6 11. a3 Be6 12. Bb5 Bd7 13. Re1 Ne7 14. Bxd7 Qxd7
  2. d4 Ng6 16. dxe5 dxe5 17. Qxd7 Nxd7 18. Red1 Ndf8 19. Nd2 f6 20. Nc4 Red8 21.
    f3 Kf7 22. Kf2 Ne6 23. Rxd8 Rxd8 24. a4 Ne7 25. g3 Nc6 26. c3 h5 27. Bc1 Ra8 28.
    Ra3 Rd8 29. Ra1 Ra8 30. Ra3 Rd8 31. Ra1 Ra8 32. Ra3 1/2-1/2

1.e4 e5 2. Bc4 Nf6 3. d3 (SF plays 3 Nc3) Bc5 (3…c6) 4. Nc3 (4 Nf3) O-O (4…c6) 5. Nf3 (SF plays 5 a4, a move yet to be played by a human)

George Hatfeild Gossip

vs Siegbert Tarrasch


Event: DSB-06.Kongress
Site: Breslau Date: ??/??/1889
Round: 4 Score: 0-1
ECO: C25 Vienna game
1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Bc5 3.Nf3 d6 4.d4 exd4 5.Nxd4 Nf6 6.Bc4 Bb4 7.O-O Bxc3 8.bxc3 h6 9.Ba3 Nbd7 10.Qd2 O-O 11.Rae1 Re8 12.Nf5 Ne5 13.Bb3 Bxf5 14.exf5 Qd7 15.f4 Nc6 16.Qd3 Ne7 17.Be6 fxe6 18.fxe6 Qa4 19.c4 Qa5 20.f5 Nc6 21.Bb2 Qb6+ 22.c5 Qxb2 23.cxd6 cxd6 24.Qxd6 Qd4+ 25.Qxd4 Nxd4 0-1
https://www.365chess.com/game.php?back=1&gid=2693930&m=13

Hans Niemann vs Awonder Liang C00 French, Chigorin Variation With 2 Qe2

Imagine the surprise, and elation, upon seeing the move 2 Qe2 played by Hans, My Man, Niemann on the board in the last round of the 2022 US Chess Championship!

GM Hans Niemann

vs GM Awonder Liang


2022 US Chess Championship
Last Round

  1. e4 e6 2. Qe2 c5 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. g3 e5 5. Bg2 g6 6. O-O Bg7 7. c3 Nge7 8. Na3 O-O 9. Nc2 d5 10. d3 h6 11. a3 d4 12. c4 a5 13. Rb1 a4 14. Nd2 Be6 15. f4 Qd7 16. Ne1 Qc7 17. Ndf3 f6 18. Nh4 g5 19. Nf5 Nxf5 20. exf5 Bxf5 21. fxg5 fxg5 22. Bxg5 Bg6 23. Rxf8+ Rxf8 24. Bd2 Qe7 25. Nf3 e4 26. Nh4 Bh7 27. dxe4 Qe6 28. Qh5 Qf7 29. Qd5 Ne5 30. Bf4 Nxc4 31. Qxc5 b6 32. Qb5 Ne3 33. Re1 Qb3 34. Qxb3+ axb3 35. e5 Nxg2 36. Kxg2 Rc8 37. Re2 d3 38. Rd2 Rc2 39. Nf3 Be4 40. Kf2 Bxf3 41. Kxf3 Bxe5 42. Rxd3 Bxf4 43. Kxf4 Rxb2 44. h4 Rb1 45. Kg4 b2 46. Rb3 Ra1 47. Rxb2 Rxa3 48. Rxb6 h5+ 49. Kf4 Kg7 50. Re6 Ra4+ 51. Re4 Ra5 52. Re5 Ra4+ 53. Re4 Ra5 54. Re5 Ra4+ 55. Kg5 Rg4+ 56. Kxh5 Rxg3 57. Rg5+ Rxg5+ 58. hxg5 Kh7 59. g6+ Kg7 60. Kg5 Kg8 61. Kf6 Kf8 62. Kf5 Kg7 63. Kg5 Kg8 64. Kh6 Kh8 65. g7+ Kg8 66. Kg6 1/2-1/2
    https://lichess.org/broadcast/us-chess-championship/round-13/7IYP0TdW
  1. e4 e6 2. Qe2 c5 (It is interesting learning the Stockfish 14 NNUE program used at Lichess will play 2…e5, moving the pawn again. According to the Big Database at 365Chess.com the move played in the game has been seen in 2196 games, dwarffing the 428 of second place 2…Be7. The move 2…Nc6 shows 231 games, with 2…b6 [206] and 2…e5 [205] virtually tied fourth place) 3. Nf3 (Although played most often [937] SF plays the second most often played move 3 g3 [693], which was the move invariably played played by this writer ‘back in the day’. And if you believe that, I have stock in Chess.com that I will sell you cheap!) 3…Nc6 4. g3 e5 (SF plays 4…g6, as have most humans (657) according to 365Chess.com, and so will Stockfish. Only 11 humans have played the move chosen by Awonder.) 5. Bg2 (SF says 5 d3) g6 6. O-O Bg7 7. c3 (SF 7 Na3) Nge7 8. Na3 O-O (SF 8…d6) 9. Nc2 (SF 9 d3) d5 10. d3 h6 11. a3 (11 Nh4) d4 (Be6) 12. c4 (12 dxc4 SF) a5 13. Rb1 (Nd2) a4 14. Nd2 Be6 (14…Ra6) 15. f4 Qd7 (15…Ra6) 16. Ne1 (SF says 16 b3) Qc7 (16…Rb8) 17. Ndf3 (17 b4) f6 18. Nh4 (18 b3) g5 (18 exf4) 19. Nf5 Nxf5 20. exf5 Bxf5 21. fxg5 fxg5 22. Bxg5 Bg6 23. Rxf8+ Rxf8 24. Bd2 Qe7 (24…Qb6)
Position after 24…Ne7. White to move

Nh4 Bh7 27. dxe4 (27 Bxd4) Qe6 (Qd7) 28. Qh5 Qf7 (28…d3) 29. Qd5 (29 Qxf7) Ne5 (Qxd5) 30. Bf4 (30 Nf5) Nxc4 (30…Qxd5) 31. Qxc5 b6 (31…d3) 32. Qb5 (32 Qc6) Ne3 33. Re1 Qb3 34. Qxb3+ axb3 35. e5 (35 Bf3) Nxg2 36. Kxg2 Rc8 37. Re2 (37 Kf3) d3 (37…Rc2) 38. Rd2 Rc2 (It shows an arrow from the bishop on h7 to the e4 square, which would be check, but in the annotations one finds, “Inaccuracy. Bf8 was best.”) 39. Nf3 Be4 40. Kf2 Bxf3 41. Kxf3 Bxe5 42. Rxd3 Bxf4 43. Kxf4 Rxb2 44. h4 Rb1 45. Kg4 b2 46. Rb3 Ra1 47. Rxb2 Rxa3 48. Rxb6 h5+ 49. Kf4 Kg7 50. Re6 Ra4+ 51. Re4 Ra5 52. Re5 Ra4+ 53. Re4 Ra5 54. Re5 Ra4+ 55. Kg5 Rg4+ 56. Kxh5 Rxg3 57. Rg5+ Rxg5+ 58. hxg5 Kh7 59. g6+ Kg7 60. Kg5 Kg8 61. Kf6 Kf8 62. Kf5 Kg7 63. Kg5 Kg8 64. Kh6 Kh8 65. g7+ Kg8 66. Kg6 1/2-1/2

Daniela Miteva vs Margarita Voiska (2345)
Event: BUL-chT (Women)
Site: Bankia Date: ??/??/1992
Round: ?
ECO: C00 French, Chigorin variation
1.e4 e6 2.Qe2 c5 3.Nf3 Nc6 4.g3 e5 5.Bg2 g6 6.O-O Bg7 7.c3 Nge7 8.d3 O-O 9.Be3 b6 10.Ne1 d5 11.f4 Be6 12.Nf3 Qd7 13.fxe5 dxe4 14.dxe4 Bg4 15.Rd1 Qc8 16.Nbd2 Nxe5 17.Nc4 Qa6 18.b3 Nxc4 19.bxc4 Nc6 20.Rd5 Bxc3 21.Rc1 Bd4 22.h3 Bxf3 23.Bxf3 Qa3 24.Re1 Bxe3+ 25.Qxe3 Qxa2 26.Rh5 Qb2 27.Rd5 Nd4 28.Bg4 a5 29.Qh6 Qc3 30.Rf1 Ne6 31.Rd7 Qxg3+ 32.Kh1 Qe5 0-1
https://www.365chess.com/game.php?back=1&gid=1901572&m=12

Curious about the move the Stockfish program at Lichess would, given the chance, play on the second move for Black I put it into the analysis program (Why do most people call it an “engine”? Why do commentators not inform we readers of the NAME of the “ENGINE” used? Just askin’…) at Lichess.com and the following were the best moves according to the PROGRAM NAMED STOCKFISH:

  1. e4 e6 2. Qe2 e5 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. c3 Be7 5. d4 exd4 6. cxd4 d5 7. e5 f6 8. Nc3 fxe5 9. dxe5 d4 10. Bf4 dxc3 11. Rd1 Bd7 12. e6 cxb2 13. exd7+ Qxd7 14. Rxd7 b1=Q+ 15. Rd1 Qf5 16. g3 Rd8 17. Bg2 Rxd1+ 18. Qxd1 Bb4+ 19. Nd2 Qe6+ 20. Be3 Qc4 21. Qe2 Qc1+ 22. Qd1 Bxd2+ 23. Bxd2 Qxd1+ 24. Kxd1 Nf6 25. Be3 Kd7 26. Ke2 Re8 27. Rb1 Kc8 28. Kf1 a6 29. Bh3+ Kb8 30. Bg2 Kc8 31. Bh3+ Kb8 32. Bg3+ 1/2-1/2

Christopher Yoo in Fantasyland

In the eighth round of the US Chess Championship young Christopher Yoo uncorked the seldom played Fantasy variation by moving his f-pawn one square on his third move. Word on the Chess street is seeing the move onscreen caused GM Ben Finegold to have a conniption fit.

Seeing the move made this Chess fan smile. Unfortunately, the offbeat openings played ‘back in the day’ do not see much action these daze, so when one is essayed it is a special treat.

[Event “U.S. Chess Championship”]
[Site “Saint Louis, United States”]
[Date “2022.10.13”]
[Round “8.2”]
[White “Yoo, Christopher”]
[Black “Xiong, Jeffery”]
[Result “0-1”]
[WhiteElo “2563”]
[BlackElo “2690”]
[UTCDate “2022.10.13”]

[ECO “B12”]
[Opening “Caro-Kann Defense: Maróczy Variation”]

  1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. f3 Qb6 4. Nc3 dxe4 5. fxe4 e5 6. Nf3 exd4 7. Qxd4 Be6 8. Bf4 Ne7 9. Bd6 Ng6 10. Bxf8 Rxf8 11. O-O-O Qxd4 12. Nxd4 Ne5 13. Nf5 Bxf5 14. exf5 Nbd7 15. Be2 O-O-O 16. g4 Kc7 17. g5 Rh8 18. h4 h6 19. Ne4 hxg5 20. hxg5 Nb6 21. Rxh8 Rxh8 22. f6 g6 23. c4 Nbxc4 24. Bxc4 Nxc4 25. Nc5 Nd6 26. Re1 Re8 27. Rxe8 Nxe8 28. Kd2 b6 29. Nd3 Kd6 30. Ke3 Nc7 31. Ke4 Ne6 32. Ne5 Nxg5+ 33. Kf4 Ne6+ 34. Ke4 Nd8 35. Kf4 Ke6 36. Ng4 Nb7 37. Kg5 Nc5 38. Nf2 Nd7 39. Nd3 Nxf6 40. Nb4 c5 41. Nc6 a5 42. Nd8+ Ke7 43. Nc6+ Kd7 44. Ne5+ Ke6 45. Nc4 Nd7 46. a4 Kd5 47. b3 Kd4 48. Nd6 Kc3 49. Nxf7 Kxb3 50. Kf4 Kxa4 0-1
    https://lichess.org/broadcast/us-chess-championship/round-8/fm2WddB4

The best moves according to the Stockfish program at Lichess.com are given in parenthesis.

1.e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. f3 (The Stockfish program has determined the insipid 3 exd5 is the best move. Where is the fun in that move?!) 3…Qb6 (3…e6) 4. Nc3 dxe4 (4…e6) 5. fxe4 (5 Bc4) 5…e5 6. Nf3 exd4 7. Qxd4 (7 Nxe4) 7…Be6 (TN SF plays 7…Nf6) 8. Bf4 (a4) 8… Ne7 (Nf6) 9. Bd6 (9 Be3) 9…Ng6 (9…Nbd7) 10. Bxf8 Rxf8 (10…Qxd4) 11. O-O-O (11 Qxg7) 11…Qxd4 12. Nxd4 Ne5 13. Nf5 Bxf5 14. exf5 Nbd7 15. Be2 O-O-O (15…a5) 16. g4 (16 b4) Kc7 17. g5 Rh8 (17…Rde8) 18. h4 (18 Ne4) 18…h6 19 Ne4 (19 gxh6) 19…hxg5 20. hxg5 Nb6 21. Rxh8 (21 Re1) 21…Rxh8 22. f6 (22 Re1) 22…g6 23. c4 (23 b4) The game is, for all intents and purposes, over.

Bartlomiej Heberla (2487) vs Mikheil Mchedlishvili (2568)
Event: EU-ch 7th
Site: Kusadasi Date: 04/13/2006
Round: 9
ECO: B12 Caro-Kann, Tartakower (fantasy) variation
1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.f3 Qb6 4.Nc3 dxe4 5.Bc4 Nf6 6.Qe2 Qxd4 7.Be3 Qd8 8.fxe4 Bg4 9.Nf3 e6 10.O-O Nbd7 11.Qf2 Bd6 12.Rad1 Qc7 13.Rxd6 Qxd6 14.e5 Nxe5 15.Nxe5 Qxe5 16.Bd4 Qc7 17.Bxf6 gxf6 18.Qxf6 Rf8 19.Ne4 Bf5 20.Rxf5 exf5 21.Nd6+ Kd7 22.Nxf7 Rxf7 23.Qxf7+ Kd6 24.Qf6+ Kc5 25.Bd3 Qd7 26.Qe5+ Kb6 27.b4 a5 28.Qc5+ Kc7 29.bxa5 Rd8 30.Qb6+ Kb8 31.a6 Qd4+ 32.Qxd4 Rxd4 33.axb7 h6 34.Bxf5 Kxb7 35.Bd3 Kc7 36.Kf2 Ra4 37.Kf3 Kd6 38.g4 Ke5 39.h4 Rxa2 40.g5 h5 41.Bg6 Ra3+ 42.Ke2 Rh3 43.Bxh5 Rxh4 44.Be8 c5 ½-½
https://www.365chess.com/game.php?back=1&gid=3331874&m=13

Arjun Erigaisi (2660) vs Tahsin Tajwar Zia, (2235)
Event: TCh-BAN Premier 2022
Site: Dhaka BAN Date: 03/20/2022
Round: 11.2
ECO: B12 Caro-Kann, Tartakower (fantasy) variation
1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.f3 Qb6 4.Nc3 dxe4 5.Bc4 Nf6 6.Qe2 h5 7.fxe4 e5 8.dxe5 Ng4 9.Nf3 Nd7 10.e6 fxe6 11.Bxe6 Nde5 12.Bxc8 Rxc8 13.h3 Nxf3+ 14.gxf3 Ne5 15.f4 Be7 16.Kf1 Bh4 17.Kg2 O-O 18.Rf1 c5 19.Nd5 Qg6+ 20.Kh1 Nc6 21.Rg1 Nd4 22.Rxg6 Nxe2 23.Rg2 Ng3+ 24.Rxg3 Bxg3 25.Ne7+ Kf7 26.Nxc8 Rxc8 27.Kg2 Bh4 28.Be3 b6 29.Rd1 Rd8 30.Rg1 g6 31.Kf3 Kf6 32.a4 a5 33.Ra1 Ke6 34.Ke2 Bf6 35.Rg1 Rg8 36.Kf3 1-0
https://www.365chess.com/game.php?back=1&gid=4337871&m=13

I began putting the moves into the analysis program at Lichess to only look at the opening moves. Next thing I know I was in the middle game and “just had” to know how the game would play out, so I opened Hearts of Space (https://v4.hos.com/this-week/program) and listened while watching the game as time stood still for quite a while.

  1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. f3 Qb6 4. Nc3 dxe4 5. Bc4 Nf6 6. fxe4 e5 7. dxe5 Ng4 8. Qe2 Nxe5 9. Bb3 Bg4 10. Nf3 Be7 11. Be3 Qd8 12. Rd1 Qa5 13. O-O Nxf3+ 14. gxf3 Bh3 15. Rfe1 Qh5 16. Kh1 Nd7 17. Rg1 Rg8 18. Rg3 g6 19. a4 a5 20. Bf4 Nc5 21. Nd5 cxd5 22. exd5 Kf8 23. Qe3 Re8 24. Bh6+ Rg7 25. Bxg7+ Kxg7 26. d6 Bxd6 27. Qxe8 Ne4 28. Qxe4 Bxg3 29. Qe2 b6 30. Bd5 Bf5 31. Qd2 Kf8 32. Rg1 Be5 33. b3 Qh4 34. Rg2 Bd7 35. Re2 Qh3 36. Re1 Bg3 37. Rg1 Bc7 38. Qf2 Qh6 39. Rd1 Bh3 40. Qd4 Qg5 41. Rg1 Qh5 42. c4 Qe5 43. Qxe5 Bxe5 44. Re1 Bc3 45. Re2 Bb4 46. Bc6 Be6 47. h4 Kg7 48. Re3 Kf6 49. Re2 Bf5 50. Bd5 h6 51. Be4 Bc8 52. Bd5 Bf5 53. Be4 Be6 54. Kg2 g5 55. h5 Bd7 56. Bd5 Kg7 57. Re3 Bc5 58. Re1 Bb4 59. Rd1 f5 60. Be4 Be6 61. Bb7 Bc5 62. Bd5 Bd7 63. Bf7 Bc6 64. Be6 g4 65. Bd5 Be8 66. fxg4 fxg4 67. Kg3 Bxh5 68. Be4 Bf7 69. Kxg4 Kf6 70. Kf4 h5 71. Bf5 h4 72. Rh1 Bf2 73. Ke4 Kg5 74. Rh2 Be1 75. Rg2+ Bg3 76. Rd2 Be1 77. Rg2+ Bg3 78. Bh3 Bh5 79. Rd2 Bf7 80. Rd7 Bg6+ 81. Kf3 Bh5+ 82. Ke3 Be8 83. Rd5+ Kf6 84. c5 bxc5 85. Ke2 Bf7 86. Rxc5 Bxb3 87. Rxa5 Ke7 88. Ra7+ Kd6 89. a5 Bc4+ 90. Ke3 Be1 91. a6 Kc6 92. Bc8 h3 93. Rh7 Bxa6 94. Bxa6 Kb6 95. Rh6+ Kc5 96. Rh5+ Kb6 97. Be2 h2 98. Rxh2 Kc5 99. Rh5+ Kc6 100. Rh1 Bb4 101. Ke4 Kd6 102. Rc1 Ba3 103. Rc2 Bb4 104. Bb5 Ke6 105. Rc6+ Bd6 106. Rb6 Ke7 107. Kf5 Bh2 108. Re6+ Kd8 109. Rc6 Ke7 110. Rc2 Bb8 111. Rd2 Bd6 112. Rd4 Bg3 113. Rd7+ Ke8 114. Ke6 Kf8 115. Rf7+ Kg8 116. Bc4 Be1 117. Kf6 Bc3+ 118. Kg6 Bg7 119. Rf3+ Kh8 120. Rh3+ Bh6 121. Rxh6#

The 2022 US Chess Championships

This writer was able to watch most, not all, of the coverage of the 2022 US Chess Championships. When unable to watch the live broadcast for various reasons I went back and watched what was missed earlier during the first twelve rounds. There were many “technical problems” with the last round so I turned it off and watched the games the old fashioned way by watching the moves played at Lichess.com. I did not later watch what was missed during the last round. Yasser mentioned something about the broadcast emanating from philanthropy and I realize the broadcast is not like any for profit broadcast, such as a Baseball game, or golf tournament, etc. Nevertheless, the broadcasts emanating from the St. Louis Chess Campus have been ongoing for many years, long enough for those broadcasting to have their collective act together. At the beginning of the broadcasts the commentators would focus on one game for a length of time, which was disconcerting, because there were fourteen ongoing games. I thought an overview of all the games should be given and from the emails received, so did many other viewers. One day the guys and girl focused almost exclusively on one game, which caused me to fire a salvo at the folks in St. Louis. After it happened again another salvo was fired, but no response was received from the Campus. I simply turned off the volume and watched the opening moves of all the games at Lichess.com.

I realize the commentators are not ‘professional’ media types, but they are getting paid, so maybe they could be considered “untrained” professionals. In one salvo fired at the StLCC I asked if there was a director, but have yet to receive an answer. A director could inform the commentators of where there was “action” in another game and they could switch to it immediately. I recall one instance when they were following an endgame in the open while there was a very interesting game with lieelt time remaining being contested in the women’s championship. I also recall Yasser saying something about, “We’re staying right here!” I tuned the sound off and watched the women’s game on Lichess.com.

Anastasiya Karlovich

(born 29 May 1982) is a Ukrainian chess player and journalist. She achieved the FIDE titles Woman International Master in 2000 and Woman Grandmaster in 2003. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anastasiya_Karlovich) Her accent often made it hard to understand what she was saying. In addition, she had a disconcerting habit of talking over Yasser. It is impossible to understand what is being said when two people are talking, which happened all too often.

That said, I still give the StLCC a B+ for the effort. There were too many positives for a lower grade to be given. Please understand this old Warrior is still amazed at being able to watch something like this, which was unheard of ‘back in the day’. “Shelbourne Richard Lyman (October 22, 1936 – August 11, 2019) was an American chess player and teacher known for hosting a live broadcast of the 1972 World Chess Championship for the PBS television station Channel 13 in New York. This broadcast became the highest-rated public television program ever at that time, far surpassing viewership expectations.” In addition, Shelby also, “…later hosted a two-hour broadcast covering the World Chess Championship 1986. This segment was recorded at WNYE-TV in Brooklyn and aired on 120 public television stations.” (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shelby_Lyman) It was during the latter time the woman with whom I lived, after watching the first broadcast, facetiously called him, “Mr. Charisma.” Chess broadcasts have come a long way, baby.

When there was a break in the action I would glance at some of the comments left by those watching. I was surprised when reading some that questioned Yasser Seirawan’s penchant for telling stories of the past. “you cannot understand where you are at unless you know where you have been,” I thought. One of the pleasures of my childhood was watching the Baseball Game of the Week on Saturday afternoon. Former Major League Baseball players Dizzy Dean and Pee Wee Reese

https://jimmiekepler.com/2016/05/16/dizzy-dean-and-pee-wee-reese-2/

would regale we neophytes with stories of bygone days, just as Yasser does during the broadcast. To this writer those stories are one of the best facets of the broadcasts. One was so good I took notes, realizing words would not come near describing how good was the tale. Imagine the elation when the segment was found! It concerns former World Chess Champ Gary Kasparov and to just read the words, or even listen to them, would not contain the visceral response shown by Yasser. All the hours spent spectating, and listening to the broadcasts were worth it just to be able to see Yasser when describing the story.

Seirawan, Yasser – Kasparov, Garry 1-0
D91 Dubai ol (Men)
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.Nf3 Bg7 5.Bg5 Ne4 6.cxd5 Nxg5 7.Nxg5 e6 8.Nf3 exd5 9.b4 Qd6 10.a3 O-O 11.e3 c6 12.Be2 Bf5 13.O-O Nd7 14.Na4 a5 15.Qb3 b5 16.Nc5 a4 17.Qc3 Nb6 18.Nd2 Rae8 19.Rfe1 Re7 20.Bf3 Rfe8 21.g3 Bh3 22.Bg2 Bxg2 23.Kxg2 f5 24.h4 Nc4 25.Nf3 Bf6 26.Re2 Rg7 27.Rh1 Qe7 28.Ree1 h6 29.Qd3 Rf8 30.Nd2 Qe8 31.Nxc4 dxc4 32.Qd1 Re7 33.Ref1 Qf7 34.Qf3 Qd5 35.Qxd5+ cxd5 36.Kf3 Bg7 37.Rd1 Rff7 38.Rd2 Re8 39.Rdd1 Bf8 40.Rdg1 Bg7 41.Rd1 Kf8 42.Rd2 Ke7 43.Rdd1 Kd6 44.Rh2 Kc6 45.Rhh1 Bf8 46.Rd2 Bd6 47.Rdd1 Bxc5 48.dxc5 Re4 49.Rhe1 Rd7 50.Rd4 g5 51.hxg5 hxg5 52.Red1 Rxd4 53.Rxd4 Rh7 54.Ke2 Rh3 55.g4 f4 56.exf4 Rxa3 57.fxg5 Ra2+ 58.Kf3 c3 59.Rd1 d4 60.g6 d3 61.Ke3 Rxf2 62.g7 1-0
https://www.365chess.com/search_result.php?wid=8111&bid=6404&wlname=Seirawan%2C+Yasser&open=&blname=Kasparov%2C+Garry&eco=&nocolor=on&yeari=&yeare=&sply=1&ply=&res=&submit_search=1#

Kasparov, Garry – Seirawan, Yasser 1-0
D21 Thessaloniki ol (Men)
1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 c5 3.c4 dxc4 4.Nc3 cxd4 5.Qxd4 Qxd4 6.Nxd4 Bd7 7.Ndb5 Na6 8.e4 Nf6 9.f3 Bxb5 10.Nxb5 e5 11.Be3 Bb4+ 12.Kf2 Ke7 13.Bxc4 Rhc8 14.Rac1 Bc5 15.Rhd1 Bxe3+ 16.Kxe3 Ne8 17.Bb3 Rxc1 18.Rxc1 f6 19.a3 Nd6 20.Bd5 Nxb5 21.Bxb7 Nbc7 22.Bxa8 Nxa8 23.Rc8 Nb6 24.Rg8 Kf7 25.Rh8 Nc5 26.Rb8 Ke7 27.b4 Nc4+ 28.Ke2 Nd7 29.Rg8 g5 30.a4 a5 31.bxa5 Nxa5 32.Ra8 Nc6 33.a5 Kd6 34.g3 h5 35.h4 gxh4 36.gxh4 Nc5 37.a6 Kc7 38.a7 Nb7 1-0
https://www.365chess.com/search_result.php?wid=8111&bid=6404&wlname=Seirawan%2C+Yasser&open=&blname=Kasparov%2C+Garry&eco=&nocolor=on&yeari=&yeare=&sply=1&ply=&res=&submit_search=1#

The 2022 US Chess Championships were inherently unfair. The player of the white pieces has an advantage, which is more apparent in the Open than with the Women. Someone was overheard saying to a student, “Fabiano Caruana played the best Chess in the tournament.” I begged to differ, saying Ray Robson played the best Chess. He knew how much time I had spent on viewing the action, so respected my opinion, but still questioned the statement. “Fabi had the white pieces in seven games; Robson in only six,” I said.

It is long past the time those in the Chess world come to terms with the fact that the way tournaments are structured favors one half of the field. The only way to remedy the problem is to have a US Chess Championship in which each player has an equal number of games with both colors. This could be done by having an eight player field, the Elite Eight, with two games versus each of the seven opponents, making for a fourteen round tournament. The fact is there were too many players who should not have been playing in the tournament.

The games are too long. The time for the games should be shortened because there are many games which do not begin until the players have spouted out twenty moves of opening theory in only a few minutes. Give the players ninety minutes with some kind of increment and have them play two games each day. It would be like going to work an eight hour day job. After the first game there would be a two hour break and the second game could then begin.

Deciding a championship by playing speed (kills) Chess is ludicrous, especially when a so-called “champion” is determined by some abomination called, appropriately enough, “Armageddon”. One of the definitions of Armageddon is: “A decisive or catastrophic conflict.” (https://www.thefreedictionary.com/Armaggedon). On second thought maybe it is appropriate after the World Champion, Magnus Carlsen, in an unprecedented act, withdrew from the Sinquefield Cup after losing a badly played game to Hans Niemann. There is nothing worse than for a player to withdraw in a round robin tournament, unless there was some major reason for so doing, such as having a stroke, or going blind, etc. The action of sore loser Carlsen was an affront to the Royal Game, the Singuefield Cup, and to the St. Louis Chess Club. In addition, it was a slap in the face to the man responsible for the philanthropy, Rex Sinquefield. Tony Rich, Executive Director of the St. Louis Chess Campus,

said Magnus would be welcomed back to the STLCC, but he will never be welcomed by this writer. It is possible his ill-advised action will bring down the House of Chess. Magnus will not be the Chess champion of the world much longer and he should be classified as persona non grata everywhere, forced to sit home and ‘stream’ like Hikaru Nakamura

https://www.youtube.com/c/GMHikaru

and Ben Finegold.

https://www.youtube.com/c/GMBenjaminFinegold

The Player of Games

After vowing to leave the games played by the so-called “Super” Grandmasters alone my mind was changed after watching a game from the ongoing Sinquefield Cup Chess tournament being played at the St. Louis Chess Campus. Although it seems like yesterday when GM Caruana was equal to World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen in the only games that really matter, classical games, the fact is that was a pandemic ago. Fabiano has not been the same player, while Magnus has become the G.O.A.T. You can argue for your favorite Chess player of all time but the fact is that every generation is better than its predecessor because they stand on the shoulders of the giants who preceded them. In addition, Magnus has tools of which former World Champions could only dream. Because of the computer programs my understanding is much better because of the games played by the best programs, even if I cannot demonstrate it over the board because of my advanced age.

One can only speculate, but for my money if there had not been a pandemic and a Alireza Firouzja, GM Caruana would have had another chance to play for the World Championship. After the young Firouzja went full tilt and completely melted down in the most recent Candidates tournament Fabiano began flinging pawns at his opponents like they were spears. He began playing wildly aggressive Chess like that seen decades ago. Unfortunately, it has continued… Examine this position and determine what move you would make after first listing your candidate moves, then return to the blog:

White to move

The position emanates from the game between Fabiano Caruana and Lenier Dominguez in the second round of the ongoing Sinquefield Cup Chess tournament being played at the St. Louis Chess Campus.

Fabiano Caruana let a first win slip from his grasp against Leinier Dominguez | photo: Lennart Ootes, Grand Chess Tour https://chess24.com/en/read/news/sinquefield-cup-2-niemann-catches-carlsen

Caruana played 12 g4, the move I would have played at the Stein Club in the 1970s. (https://xpertchesslessons.wordpress.com/2021/06/06/shanglei-lu-seeks-bishops-opening-truth/) Truth be told, I would probably have played that move in a USCF tournament ‘back in the day’. 12 Rhe1 was a candidate move, as was 12 Kb1. If I could speak to IM of GM strength Boris Kogan about now I would say, “It has taken a lifetime, Boris, but I have finally found understanding, or at least some understanding.” He would laugh uproariously. The Stockfish program at LiChess.com gives 12 a3 as best. It was not one of my choices. The diagram contains an arrow showing the pawn to be moved, and 12 a3 is given in the note up top, but down below the Stockfish program shows this: “Inaccuracy. Rhe1 was best”, and it gives a line six moves deep to prove it. What I want to know is, which is it? By the way, according to the analysis program at LiChess the best move is 12 Bb5. I cannot make this up. In the only game found at 365Chess.com the move 12 Kb1 was played, and it was on my short list of candidate moves.

Stefan Mazur (2417) vs Juraj Druska (2501)
Event: ch-SVK 2021
Site: Podhajska SVK Date: 09/28/2021
Round: 8.5
ECO: C42 Petrov, Nimzovich attack
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.Nxe5 d6 4.Nf3 Nxe4 5.Nc3 Nxc3 6.dxc3 Be7 7.Be3 O-O 8.Qd2 Re8 9.O-O-O Nd7 10.Bd3 Nf6 11.h3 c5 12.Kb1 Bd7 13.Rhe1 Bc6 14.Bg5 h6 15.Bf4 Bf8 16.Rxe8 Qxe8 17.Nh4 Ne4 18.Bxe4 Qxe4 19.Re1 Qh7 20.Bg3 g5 21.Nf3 Qf5 22.h4 f6 23.Nh2 Re8 24.Rxe8 Bxe8 25.Nf1 Bc6 26.Ne3 Qe6 27.c4 Kf7 28.f3 f5 29.hxg5 hxg5 30.Nd5 f4 31.Bf2 b5 32.b3 bxc4 33.bxc4 Bg7 34.Qd3 Qe5 35.Kc1 Bd7 36.Kd2 Be6 37.Nc7 Bf5 38.Qd5+ Ke7 39.Nb5 Be6 40.Qb7+ Kf6 41.Qc6 Bxc4 42.Qxd6+ Qxd6+ 43.Nxd6 Bxa2 44.Bxc5 a6 45.Kd3 Ke6 46.Ne4 Kd5 47.Be7 Bc4+ 48.Kd2 g4 49.Bg5 Bf1 50.Bxf4 Bxg2 51.c4+ Kxc4 52.Nd6+ Kb3 53.fxg4 a5 54.Nf5 Bc3+ 55.Kc1 Bb2+ 56.Kd2 Bc3+ 57.Kc1 a4 58.Bd6 Be4 59.Ne3 Bf3 60.g5 Be4 61.Nd1 Be1 62.Ne3 Bh4 63.Be7 a3 64.Nc4 a2 65.Nd2+ Ka4 66.Kb2 Bd5 67.Ne4 Be1 68.Bf6 Bxe4 69.Kxa2 ½-½
https://www.365chess.com/game.php?back=1&gid=4308407&m=23

Consider this position:

Position after 26…Rf8

The position is taken from the same game, and GM Lenier Dominguez has just played his Rook to f8 attacking the white Queen. Nevertheless, it is a losing move after Caruana plays the Queen to d7. Unfortunately, Fabiano lost the thread and played 27 Qe4, which is, like the previous move made by GM Dominguez, given not one, but two question marks. It seems we Chess fans have seen an inordinate number of “double blunders” since Magnus Carlsen, in his World Championship match with Vishy Anand, blundered horribly, but was let off of the hook when Anand immediately returned the favor.

https://www.firstpost.com/sports/double-blunder-game-carlsen-crushes-anand-leads-one-point-1804783.html

Surely Caruana must have seen Qd7, yet played the much inferior move. Why? Consider this recent quote by Fabiano Caruana: “I realised something, which is that, even though I played pretty awfully recently, I do destroy one opening, which is the Najdorf. All my wins are in this one opening.”

(https://chess24.com/en/read/news/sinquefield-cup-4-fabi-wins-so-leads-as-life-goes-on-without-magnus)

When a player, not just a Chess player, but any ‘player’, is “in form” good moves seem to flow, but when a player is not in form he begins to second guess himself. My father was fond of saying, “Think long, think wrong.” There is much to be said for it because the longer one thinks the less intuition is involved. The number of times I saw the right move intuitively but allowed the ‘logical’ part of my thought process to make a weaker move could not be counted without a calculator. Talking yourself out of listening to yourself is a bad place to be for any player of games.

Three Way Tie for First Place at the Chessable British Chess Championships: Seniors 50+

https://www.britishchesschampionships.co.uk/chessable-british-chess-championships-week-one/

GM Paul Motwani (above left) shared the lead throughout the tournament and finished with shared top place with FM Chris Duncan (middle) and Phil Crocker (right), all on 5.5 points.

Heading into the last round of the Chessable British Chess Championships: Seniors 50+ five players were tied for first place with each having scored 4 1/2 points in the first six rounds. Board one featured FM Chris Duncan (2178) vs Paul Townsend (2177).

Black to move after 21 Nc3xb5

FM Chris Duncan vs M Paul Townsend
Chessable British Chess Championships: Seniors 50+
Final Round Seven
D37 Queen’s Gambit Declined, classical variation (5.Bf4)

  1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 d5 4. d4 Be7 5. Bf4 O-O 6. e3 Nbd7 7. c5 c6 8. Bd3 b6 9. b4 a5 10. a3 Ba6 11. O-O Qc8 12. h3 Qb7 13. Rb1 axb4 14. axb4 Bxd3 15. Qxd3 Ra3 16. Ra1 Rfa8 17. Rxa3 Rxa3 18. Qc2 b5 19. Nd2 Bd8 20. Re1 Bc7 21. Nxb5 Qxb5 22. Bxc7 Qxb4 23. Rb1 Qc3 24. Qxc3 Rxc3 25. Nb3 Ne8 26. Bg3 1-0

After noticing the Stockfish program at Lichess.com has proclaimed 1 Nf3 the best opening move I have taken notice of the percentage of games in which the knight move has been chosen recently., and was therefore not surprised by the move in this game. 16 Ra1 is a TN. Stockfish shows 16 Qc2 as best and other players have agreed as 365Chess.com shows it having been previously played in eleven games. Ju Wenjun played 16 Nd2 against former World Chess Champion Anatoly Karpov at the Cap d’Agde in France in 2012, but lost the game (https://www.365chess.com/game.php?back=1&gid=3833042&m=32). That is fifteen moves of theory produced by Seniors in what 365Chess.com calls the “D37 Queen’s Gambit Declined, classical variation (5.Bf4).” The rest of the game lasted less than a dozen moves…

Position after 27…Qxe8

CM Paul AG Dargan vs Philip J Crocker
Chessable British Chess Championships: Seniors 50+
Final Round Seven
B07 Pirc, Byrne variation

  1. e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 4. Bg5 c6 5. f4 Bg7 6. Qd2 b5 7. Bd3 O-O 8. Nf3 Bg4 9. O-O Qb6 10. Ne2 c5 11. e5 d5 12. Ng3 c4 13. Be2 Ne4 14. Nxe4 dxe4 15. Bxe7 exf3 16. Bxf3 Bxf3 17. Bxf8 Bxf8 18. Rxf3 Nc6 19. c3 Rd8 20. Qf2 Ne7 21. g4 f5 22. exf6 Qxf6 23. Re1 Nd5 24. f5 Bd6 25. fxg6 Qxg6 26. h3 Re8 27. Rxe8+ Qxe8 28. Qh4 Bf4 29. g5 Qe4 30. Qg4 Qe1+ 31. Rf1 Qxf1+ 0-1

The following game varied at move twenty, but Stockfish prefers 20 Qf2. Paul Dargan was doing fine after Philip Crocker played the weak 24…Bd6, and then let go of the rope with one hand when playing 25…Qg6. Mr. Dargan then had a ‘won’ game. Unfortunately his 26th move moved the game back into anyone’s game until Dargan again let go of the rope with one hand with 28 Qh4, which is given not one, but two question marks by the Stockfish program. After that move, Mr. Dargan was obviously rattled

before letting go of the rope completely by playing 29 g5…and began…

Nguyen Thi Thanh An (2249) vs Tan, Zhongyi (2475)
Event: Olympiad Women 2016
Site: Baku AZE Date: 09/04/2016
Round: 3.1
ECO: B07 Pirc, Byrne variation
1.e4 d6 2.d4 Nf6 3.Nc3 g6 4.Bg5 Bg7 5.f4 c6 6.Qd2 b5 7.Bd3 O-O 8.Nf3 Bg4 9.O-O Qb6 10.Ne2 c5 11.e5 d5 12.Ng3 c4 13.Be2 Ne4 14.Nxe4 dxe4 15.Bxe7 exf3 16.Bxf3 Bxf3 17.Bxf8 Bxf8 18.Rxf3 Nc6 19.c3 Rd8 20.Kh1 Ne7 21.Re1 Qe6 22.Qf2 Rd7 23.Rg1 h5 24.h3 f5 25.exf6 Qxf6 26.Re1 Nf5 27.Re5 h4 28.Rxb5 Bd6 29.Qe2 Qf7 30.Qf2 Re7 31.Kg1 Ng3 32.Re5 Bxe5 33.fxe5 Nf5 34.Qd2 Kh7 35.Qg5 Rb7 36.Rf2 Qd5 37.Qg4 Rf7 38.Rf3 a5 39.Rf2 a4 40.a3 Kh6 41.Rf3 Rb7 42.Rf2 Rb6 43.Qf4+ Kh7 44.Qg4 Qd8 45.Qf4 Qd5 46.Qg4 Qb7 47.Qe2 Qc6 48.Qg4 Qd5 49.Kh2 Rb7 50.Kg1 Rf7 51.Rf3 Kg7 52.Kh2 Qb7 53.Rf2 Qe7 54.Kg1 Kh6 55.Qe2 Qe6 56.Qe4 Rd7 57.Qa8 Rf7 58.Qxa4 Ne3 59.Qa8 Rxf2 60.Kxf2 Nd1+ 61.Ke2 Nxb2 62.Qh8+ Kg5 63.Qd8+ Kh5 64.Qh8+ Kg5 65.Qd8+ Kh5 66.Qh8+ Kg5 67.Qd8+ Kh5 68.Qh8+ ½-½
https://www.365chess.com/game.php?back=1&gid=4008322&m=24

Board three featured the top rated player, GM Paul Motwani, who began the tournament rated two hundred points higher than his closest opponent, CM Mark Josse, rated 2220. On paper is should have been a cakewalk for Motwani, but this is Senior Chess, at it’s best, and numbers have less relation to strength in Senior Chess. A perfect example would be the player GM Motwani faced in the last round, class A player Nigel J Moyse, rated all of 1976, a number with special meaning to this writer, as that is the year I won the Atlanta Chess Championship for the second time, while scoring a perfect 5-0. Just sayin’…

Position after 8 Nxd4

GM Paul Motwani (2420) vs Nigel J Moyse (1976)
Chessable British Chess Championships: Seniors 50+
Final round seven
B09 Pirc, Austrian attack

  1. d4 d6 2. e4 Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 4. f4 Bg7 5. Nf3 c5 6. e5 Nfd7 7. exd6 cxd4 8. Nxd4 Qb6 9. Ndb5 Bxc3+ 10. Nxc3 O-O 11. b3 Nf6 12. Bb2 Rd8 13. Na4 Qb4+ 14. Qd2 Qxd2+ 15. Kxd2 Ne4+ 16. Ke3 Nxd6 17. Be2 Bd7 18. Nc3 Nc6 19. a3 Nf5+ 20. Kf2 Ncd4 21. Bd3 Bc6 22. Rhd1 h5 23. Ne2 Nxe2 24. Bxe2 Rac8 25. Rxd8+ Rxd8 26. Rd1 Rxd1 27. Bxd1 Kf8 28. g3 Ke8 29. h3 Nd6 30. g4 hxg4 31. hxg4 Kd7 32. Ke3 f5 33. g5 Nf7 34. c4 Kd6 35. b4 e5 36. Bb3 exf4+ 37. Kxf4 Ke6 38. Bd4 a6 39. a4 Be4 40. b5 axb5 41. axb5 Bg2 42. Bf6 Be4 43. b6 Kd7 44. c5 Nd8 45. Bxd8 Kxd8 46. Bf7 Bb1 47. Ke4 1-0

The game was even, Steven, before Nigel Moyse blundered horribly by playing 8…Qb6, when he should have simply castled. After moving the Queen the Stockfish program shows Moyse down by -4.0. Nevertheless, the game lasted forty more moves due to weak play from GM Motwani. That’s Senior Chess!

After 5 Nf3 the opening is a B09 Pirc, Austrian attack. 5…c5 turns it into a B09 Pirc, Austrian attack, dragon formation

  1. d4 d6 2. e4 (2 Nf3) 2…Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 (3…e5) 4. f4 (4 Be3) 4…Bg7 5. Nf3 c5 6. e5 (6 dxc5) 6…Nfd7 7. exd6 (7 dxc5) 7…cxd4 (7…0-0) 8. Nxd4 (8 Nb4) 8…Qb6?? (-4.0)

The Last Round: FM Jason Wang vs IM Arthur Guo

FM Jason Wang vs IM Arthur Guo
Denker Invitational
D38 Queen’s Gambit Declined, Ragozin variation

  1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 e6 3. c4 d5 4. Nc3 Bb4 5. Qa4+ Nc6 6. e3 O-O 7. Bd2 Re8 8. a3 Bf8 9. Rd1 Ne7 10. Qc2 b6 11. b4 Bb7 12. Bd3 Ng6 13. e4 dxc4 14. Bxc4 a5 15. Rb1 axb4 16. axb4 Ra3 17. Bd3 Rxc3 18. Bxc3 Nf4 19. Nd2 Nxg2+ 20. Kf1 Nf4 21. Bb5 c6 22. Bc4 Bc8 23. Rg1 e5 24. dxe5 Bh3+ 25. Ke1 Ng4 26. Nf3 Ng2+ 27. Ke2 Nf4+ 28. Ke1 Bg2 29. e6 fxe6 30. Ne5 Qh4 31. Nxg4 Qxg4 32. Be5 Nh3 33. f3 Qg5 34. Rxg2 Qxe5 35. Rg3 Nf4 36. Kf1 b5 37. Be2 Rc8 38. Qd2 Rc7 39. Rd1 Rf7 40. Rc1 Nh5 41. Rh3 Nf4 42. Rg3 Nh5 43. Rh3 Nf6 44. Kg1 Bxb4 45. Qc2 Bd6 46. Qxc6 b4 47. Rd1 Bc5+ 48. Kh1 Rc7 49. Qb5 Bd6 1/2-1/2 (9…Ne7 appears to be a TN)

In the last round of the recently completed Denker Invitational FM Jason Wang

USCS 43: St. Louis (June 2018)
uschessschool.com

faced IM Arthur Guo with a first place on the line. Arthur was a half point ahead of the contenders, one of whom was Jason Wang. After move forty it looked as though the game would end in a draw after the position was repeated, but Arthur eschewed the draw when playing 43…Nf6 in lieu of returning the knight to h5. FM Wang then blundered by playing 44 Kg1? This allowed Arthur to take a pawn with impunity while attacking the white Queen. I thought the game was over because the two passed pawns will devastate white in the long run. This is the position:

Position after 45 Qc2

It was more than a little obvious Arthur would play 46…Rc7 because every Chess player knows that ROOKS BELONG BEHIND PASSED PAWNS. I had a heart palpation after seeing Arthur’s next move of 45…Bd6. The Stockfish program at Lichess.com gives the move not one, but two question marks. The move is so bad it defies comprehension. What could have caused such a budding star to make such a horrible move? I decided to put the game up to after white played 46 Qc2 into the analysis program at Lichess.com and this is best play by Stockfish after 45 Qc2:

  1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 e6 3. c4 d5 4. Nc3 Bb4 5. Qa4+ Nc6 6. e3 O-O 7. Bd2 Re8 8. a3 Bf8 9. Rd1 Ne7 10. Qc2 b6 11. b4 Bb7 12. Bd3 Ng6 13. e4 dxc4 14. Bxc4 a5 15. Rb1 axb4 16. axb4 Ra3 17. Bd3 Rxc3 18. Bxc3 Nf4 19. Nd2 Nxg2+ 20. Kf1 Nf4 21. Bb5 c6 22. Bc4 Bc8 23. Rg1 e5 24. dxe5 Bh3+ 25. Ke1 Ng4 26. Nf3 Ng2+ 27. Ke2 Nf4+ 28. Ke1 Bg2 29. e6 fxe6 30. Ne5 Qh4 31. Nxg4 Qxg4 32. Be5 Nh3 33. f3 Qg5 34. Rxg2 Qxe5 35. Rg3 Nf4 36. Kf1 b5 37. Be2 Rc8 38. Qd2 Rc7 39. Rd1 Rf7 40. Rc1 Nh5 41. Rh3 Nf4 42. Rg3 Nh5 43. Rh3 Nf6 44. Kg1 Bxb4 45. Qc2 (Stockfish analysis begins here) Rc7 46. Kh1 Bd6 47. Rd1 Bf8 48. Qa2 g6 49. Bd3 Kh8 50. Bf1 Nh5 51. Qa8 Kg7 52. Qb8 Be7 53. Rh4 Bd6 54. Qd8 Be7 55. Qb8 Nf6 56. Rh3 Qf4 57. Ra1 Nd7 58. Qe8 Nf8 59. Rd1 Bf6 60. Rg3 Be5 61. Be2 b4 62. Bc4 c5 63. Rf1 Ra7 64. Rg2 Bd4 65. Rg4 Qe3 66. Rg3 Rf7 67. Qa8 Qf4 68. Qc6 Re7 69. Rg4 Qb8 70. Bb3 h5 71. Rg5 Qc7 72. Qxc7 Rxc7 73. Rg2 c4 74. Rc1 c3 75. f4 Nd7 76. Rd1 e5 77. fxe5 Bxe5 78. Rd5 Nc5 79. Bd1 Bf4 80. e5 b3 81. e6 Rb7 82. Rxc5 b2 83. Rxg6+ Kxg6 84. Bc2+ Kf6 85. Rxc3 b1=R+ 86. Bxb1 Rxb1+ 87. Kg2 Rb2+ 88. Kf3 Bd6 89. Rc4 Rxh2 90. Re4 Rh3+ 91. Kg2 Rg3+ 92. Kh1 Ke7 93. Re1 Rg5 94. Re3 Bg3 95. Re2 Be5 96. Rd2 Rg4 97. Rd1 Kxe6 98. Rf1 Bg3 99. Kg2 Bf4+ 100. Kh3 Rg3+ 101. Kh4 Kf5 102. Rd1 Rb3 103. Rf1 Ra3 and it is checkmate in 25

Winning a won game is difficult, and like Ringo sang, “It don’t come easy.” Almost every day at the Atlanta Chess & Game Center one would frequently hear, “I blew a WON GAME.” or, “If only I had won more WON GAMES I would be a Master (or Expert, or class A, etc. player).”

After reading the following at ChessLifeOnline in an excellent article by JJLang, dated August 3, 2022, understanding was found:

Denker

Following the old tiebreak adage of ‘lose last, laugh last,’ tournament leader Georgia’s IM Arthur Guo drew his final game against Ohio’s FM Jason Wang to win first place on tiebreaks. By not losing any games, Guo had stronger pairings throughout the tournament than his rivals, meaning tiebreaks would likely come out in his favor were he to draw his final game. Indeed, after failing to find anything concrete on the attacking side of a sharp Ragozin, Guo took the draw and, fortunately for him, the math played out in his favor.
https://new.uschess.org/news/day-4-rancho-mirage-invitationals-end-6-day-begins

Therein lies the problem. It is not as if there are not enough draws in Chess these daze. Now the pooh-bahs have made rules that only INCREASE the likelihood of a draw! Arthur needed only a DRAW to “WIN” the event. The fact is that Arthur did NOT win the tournament! He finished in a THREE WAY TIE for FIRST PLACE! The three players each scored the same number of points, five. Reading further in the aforementioned article one finds: “Northern Californian GM Andrew Hong and Arizonian FM Sandeep Sethuraman each won their final round games to finish second and third, respectively, on tiebreaks.” Simply put, that is a crock of excrement! As it stands now, tiebreaks are MORE IMPORTANT THAN THE RESULT OF THE GAME! What if there had been a three-way tie for first place? That would mean at least three times as much publicity for the Royal Game because the publicity director (USCF has a publicity director, does it not? If not, why not?!) could have articles on all three of them in local newspapers and on local TV news programs in three different cities. This ain’t the Highlander, where there can be only ONE!

The same could be said for the recently completed US Senior, where there was a FIVE-WAY TIE! Unfortunately, the brain trust at the USCF decided to have a souped-up heebe-jeeb speed tournament after the conclusion of almost TWO WEEKS of playing what now passes for classical Chess. The playoff was not the next day, but only a short time after the players had spent at least five hours playing over the board. We are talking about SENIORS here, ladies and gentlemen. Why does USCF FORCE Seniors to play nerve-wracking speed games but not force the JUNIORS to do the same? As a Senior I can tell you that a speed tournament to determine the “winner” was much more difficult on the Seniors than it would have been on the Juniors. My hat is off to GM Alexander Shabalov for winning the speed tournament, but he won more than TWICE AS MUCH MONEY as the other four for winning a SPEED TOURNAMENT! ‘Back in the day’ tournaments held five minute speed tournaments as an ancillary event, not the main event. The fact that there were tiebreaks irrevocably altered the Denker event, as it does every event in which it is used. Because of the plethora of draws Chess is unlike Go or Backgammon, where there is only ONE WINNER!
Just sayin’…

Tommy Wen vs Arthur Guo: “Ready, Aim…”

In the fourth round of the recently completed 2022 Denker Invitational, Expert, soon to be Master, Tommy Wen sat down behind the white pieces after scoring 2 1/2 out of 3 possible points facing IM Arthur Guo,

https://www.thechessdrum.net/blog/2015/05/20/2015-chicago-open-wheeling-il/

who had earlier drawn with FM Sandeep Sethuraman. After 38 moves this position was reached:

Position after 38…Nhg7

It is rare to see the knight on g7 and the bishop on f6. The same can be said of the same pieces on the queenside of the board. Most, if not all, players who have made it to class “B” would tell you white has an advantage. For those readers who do not understand the reason I will explain by first saying white has a POSITIONAL advantage because he controls more space, In addition, his pieces are better placed. Contrast the white knights with those of the black army. Then there is the unfortunate black squared bishop, jailed by pawns of the same color. which the white prelate is well positioned IN THE EVENT THE POSITION IS OPENED. Therefore, both players need the position opened to free the black squared bishops. Given the opportunity black will play h5 followed by g4. Unfortunately for black it is white to move.

I was riveted to the screen after having stopped looking at any other game as I awaited Mr. Wen’s next move. For the younger, and new to Chess, readers I would highly suggest you take some time to cogitate on the position, preferably on a real set and pieces. It would be even better if you would take time to go over the whole game, taking notes as you go, before checking the game out at Lichess.com, one of the greatest gifts ever given to the Royal Game.

While waiting for the next move I reflected upon a time many decades ago when a similar position was reached and I did not pull the trigger. After showing the game to the man who became the only player to earn the title of Georgia Chess Champion and Georgia Senior Chess Champion, NM David Vest, the High Planes Drifter, the first coach of young Mr. Guo, said “You have a problem with trying to hold on to your material. How about we play and I will make an sacrifice in every game,” Dave said. Well now, the AW was always up for a challenge ‘back in the day’ so we sat down to play. One fifteen minute game after another followed and damned if the Drifter did not make a sacrifice in each and every game! I learned the lesson and after that day I was always looking out for the possibility of making a sacrifice.

In Chess there comes a time when your position is as good as it is ever gonna get and there is one move, and only one move to be made. If you do not play that move your position will deteriorate. You are locked and loaded and simply MUST PULL THE TRIGGER! The position above is one of those occasions. Expert Wen, a non-titled player, by only six points, had an opportunity that was missed. He will undoubtedly learn from the missed opportunity.

I could attempt showing you what move should have been played and explain why, but what is the point when the Stockfish program at Lichess can do a much better job? I give the game, followed by something using the analysis board at Lichess;Stockfish vs Stockfish. By now you should know what move should have been played, what with all the hints, so what I did was utilize the SF program to play out how the game could possibly have gone, with best play, so you can see how the position is transformed after the sacrifice.

Wen (2194) vs IM Arthur Guo

  1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 O-O 8. h3 d6 9. c3 h6 10. d4 Re8 11. Nbd2 Bf8 12. a3 Bd7 13. Bc2 g6 14. Nf1 Bg7 15. Ng3 a5 16. d5 Ne7 17. b3 Nc8 18. Be3 c6 19. c4 Nb6 20. Nd2 a4 21. Bd3 bxc4 22. bxc4 Qc7 23. Rb1 Reb8 24. Qc2 Rb7 25. Rb2 Rab8 26. Reb1 Nc8 27. Ne2 c5 28. Nc3 Rxb2 29. Rxb2 Ra8 30. Nb5 Qd8 31. Nb1 Nh5 32. N1c3 Nf4 33. Bf1 f5 34. f3 Nh5 35. Nxa4 f4 36. Bf2 g5 37. Nac3 Bf6 38. a4 Ng7 39. Be2 h5 40. Qd1 Ra6 41. Kf1 Ne7 42. Ke1 Kh7 43. Kd2 Ng8 44. Kc1 Nh6 45. Kb1 Qc8 46. Be1 Bd8 47. Ra2 Ne8 48. Ra3 Nf7 49. Na2 Nf6 50. Nc1 Kg7 51. Nb3 g4 52. hxg4 hxg4 53. Nd2 Qa8 54. fxg4 Ba5 55. Bf3 Bb4 56. Ra2 Qc8 57. Nf1 Ng5 58. Bh4 Nfxe4 59. Qc2 Be8 60. Kc1 Bg6 61. Qe2 Qh8 62. Bxg5 Nxg5 63. Nxd6 Rxd6 64. Qxe5+ Kh7 65. Qxd6 Qc3+ 66. Kd1 Qe1#
    https://lichess.org/broadcast/us-open-championship-and-invitationals-2022/round-4/vpkwzK46

Wen vs Guo with Stockfish analysis from move 39

  1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 O-O 8. h3 d6 9. c3 h6 10. d4 Re8 11. Nbd2 Bf8 12. a3 Bd7 13. Bc2 g6 14. Nf1 Bg7 15. Ng3 a5 16. d5 Ne7 17. b3 Nc8 18. Be3 c6 19. c4 Nb6 20. Nd2 a4 21. Bd3 bxc4 22. bxc4 Qc7 23. Rb1 Reb8 24. Qc2 Rb7 25. Rb2 Rab8 26. Reb1 Nc8 27. Ne2 c5 28. Nc3 Rxb2 29. Rxb2 Ra8 30. Nb5 Qd8 31. Nb1 Nh5 32. N1c3 Nf4 33. Bf1 f5 34. f3 Nh5 35. Nxa4 f4 36. Bf2 g5 37. Nac3 Bf6 38. a4 Ng7 (SF vs SF begins here) 39. Nxd6 Nxd6 40. Bxc5 Nf7 41. Bb6 Qf8 42. c5 Bd8 43. Kh2 Bc8 44. d6 g4 45. fxg4 f3 46. Bc4 Ne6 47. Qf2 fxg2 48. Qf5 Neg5 49. Qg6+ Qg7 50. Qxg7+ Kxg7 51. Kxg2 Ne6 52. Bd5 Bxb6 53. Rxb6 Ra5 54. Nb5 Nxc5 55. Rc6 Nxa4 56. Rxc8 Nb6 57. Bxf7 Kxf7 58. Nc3 Nd7 59. Rh8 Ra3 60. Nd5 Kg6 61. Re8 Ra6 62. Re6+ Kg5 63. Kf3 Ra3+ 64. Ne3 Rd3 65. Re7 Rxd6 66. h4+ Kf6 67. Rh7 Rd3 68. Rxh6+ Ke7 69. Ke2 Rb3 70. Nf5+ Ke8 71. g5 Nc5 72. Rh8+ Kd7 73. Rh7+ Kc6 74. g6 Ne6 75. Kf2 Rd3 76. Re7 Nc5 77. Ke2 Rd8 78. Rxe5 Nb3 79. Ke3 Kb6 80. g7 Nc1 81. h5 Rd3+ 82. Kf4 Rd8 83. Kg5 Nb3 84. h6 Nd4 85. Nxd4 Rg8 86. Re7 Rd8 87. h7 Rxd4 88. h8=Q Rd1 89. Qc8 Rg1+ 90. Kf6 Rf1+ 91. Ke6 Rf6+ 92. Kxf6 Ka5 93. Rb7 Ka4 94. Qa8#