Georgia’s Experiment in Human Sacrifice

The state is about to find out how many people need to lose their lives to shore up the economy.

Amanda Mull
1:02 PM ET

https://cdn.theatlantic.com/thumbor/1gCk4OX6d5DbGEVwUl4CcfcwvPk=/672x505/media/img/posts/2020/04/GettyImages_1220846551toned/original.jpg

A sign announces that Maui Beach Tanning Salon is reopened for business on April 24 in Marietta, Georgia. (Kevin C. Cox / Getty)

 

At first, Derek Canavaggio thought he would be able to ride out the coronavirus pandemic at home until things were safe. As a bar manager at the Globe in Athens, Georgia, Canavaggio hasn’t been allowed to work for weeks. Local officials in Athens issued Georgia’s first local shelter-in-place order on March 19, canceling the events that usually make spring a busy time for Athens bars and effectively eliminating the city’s rowdy downtown party district built around the University of Georgia. The state’s governor, Brian Kemp, followed in early April with a statewide shutdown.

But then the governor sent Canavaggio into what he calls “spreadsheet hell.” In an announcement last week, Kemp abruptly reversed course on the shutdown, ending many of his own restrictions on businesses and overruling those put in place by mayors throughout the state. On Friday, gyms, churches, hair and nail salons, and tattoo parlors were allowed to reopen, if the owners were willing. Yesterday, restaurants and movie theaters came back. The U-turn has left Georgians scrambling. Canavaggio has spent days crunching the numbers to figure out whether reopening his bar is worth the safety risk, or even feasible in the first place, given how persistent safety concerns could crater demand for a leisurely indoor happy hour. “We can’t figure out a way to make the numbers work to sustain business and pay rent and pay everybody to go back and risk their lives,” he told me. “If we tried to open on Monday, we’d be closed in two weeks, probably for good and with more debt on our hands.”

Kemp’s order shocked people across the country. For weeks, Americans have watched the coronavirus sweep from city to city, overwhelming hospitals, traumatizing health-care workers, and leaving tens of thousands of bodies in makeshift morgues. Georgia has been hit particularly hard by the pandemic, and the state’s testing efforts have provided an incomplete look at how far the virus continues to spread. That testing capacity—which public-health leaders consider necessary for safely ending lockdowns—has lagged behind the nation’s for much of the past two months. Kemp’s move to reopen was condemned by scientists, high-ranking Republicans from his own state, and Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms; it even drew a public rebuke from President Donald Trump, who had reportedly approved the measures before distancing himself from the governor amid the backlash.

https://cdn.theatlantic.com/thumbor/0ZwMlgXS7bKXUBQeZ5cqQeTJYFM=/672x448/media/img/posts/2020/04/GettyImages_1211126716toned/original.jpg

A bench is taped off to ensure social distancing at a coffee shop in Woodstock, Georgia, on Monday, April 27. (Dustin Chambers / Bloomberg via Getty)

 

Public-health officials broadly agree that reopening businesses—especially those that require close physical contact—in places where the virus has already spread will kill people. Georgia’s brash reopening puts much of the state’s working class in an impossible bind: risk death at work, or risk ruining yourself financially at home. In the grips of a pandemic, the approach is a morbid experiment in just how far states can push their people. Georgians are now the largely unwilling canaries in an invisible coal mine, sent to find out just how many individuals need to lose their job or their life for a state to work through a plague.

Estimates vary as to how many businesses might actually reopen now, but none of the Georgians I talked with knew many people who intended to voluntarily head right back to work. That was true in Athens, which has long been one of the Deep South’s most progressive cities, as well as in Blackshear, a small town in the rural southeastern part of the state that tends toward conservatism. Kelly Girtz, the mayor of Athens, estimated that about 90 percent of the local business owners he had spoken with in the past week had no intention of reopening immediately. “Georgia’s plan simply is not that well designed,” Girtz says. “To call it a ‘plan’ might be overstating the case.”

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​(Parris Griffin / Getty)

https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2020/04/why-georgia-reopening-coronavirus-pandemic/610882/

Confirmation Garry Kasparov Cheated Judit Polgar

The most often and widely read post on this blog, Garry Kasparov Cheated Judit Polgar

https://www.juditpolgar.com/static/images/polgarJudit.png

https://www.juditpolgar.com/

(https://xpertchesslessons.wordpress.com/2017/12/11/garry-kasparov-cheated-judit-polgar/) was published December 11, 2017. The post, Garry Kasparov Cheated Judit Polgar, has been read by people in almost every country on the planet. Although other posts written many years prior to 2017 have garnered more total viewers, no post published after December 11, 2017 has been read by more often by people in more different countries since being published. It is usually among the top posts read most days, and weeks, such as this week, when it was the most read post on this blog. The post has obviously resonated with readers the all over the world.

When the new issue of NIC arrives

https://www.newinchess.com/media/catalog/product/cache/3376c6b4eaa9c30249dbded88849ca2a/n/e/newinchess_2020_2_met_randje_x500_2.jpg

this writer, and reader, usually flips through the magazine to get an overview before landing at the ‘Just Checking’ interview, which is read first. That did not happen with the current issue because a picture of Judit Polgar caught my attention and was read before going any further.

Hey Judit

“We noted with interest the release of a new documentary on Judit Polgar,  Judit contra today (Los Otros) – ‘Judit against all (The Others)‘ – produced by Movistar+, Spain’s leading online digital platform. It’s part of a series on influential game-changers in sports.

The 44-minute documentary has interviews (many in English) and old film footage from throughout her career – the highlight being the most controversial, Polgar’s first meeting with Garry Kasparov at Linares 1994. Indeed, the ‘did-he-or-didn’t-he’ release the knight incident. Now, for the first time in over 25 years, the film footage is finally seen in public.

Polger tells how her inexperience clouded her judgment about what she should have done. There was video evidence available, but that was ‘mysteriously’ spirited out of the Hotel Anibal to Madrid on the orders of the legendary godfather of the tournament, Luis Rentero.

Still, this isn’t the first time the evidence is shown, as can be read in Dirk Jan ten Geuzendam’s book Linares! Linares!.

Linares! Linares!: A Journey into the Heart of Chess

On page 79, he writes that the video in fact returned a few days later to the Hotel Anibal and was shown in a private room to several journalists and others, including the chief arbiter, Carlos Falcon. And with the benefit of an early version of VAR, they all witnessed that the piece was indeed briefly released; Falcon even writing an official letter stating this to be the case, but from his vantage point from where he was at the time, he couldn’t see this due to Kasparov’s hand shielding the piece.”

Pg 9, New In Chess, 2020 #2

To some the film was obviously as important as the infamous Zapuder film of the JFK assassination, which was kept locked away from the public for many years.

Garry Kasparov was obviously a great Chess player. Unfortunately, the only thing for which he will be remembered by history is that he was the human world champion who lost to a computer program,

https://media.wired.com/photos/5e4c10d419656c0009fbe489/master/w_2560%2Cc_limit/Biz-kasparov-511682700.jpg

“I always say I was the first knowledge worker whose job was threatened by a machine,” says Garry Kasparov of his loss to IBM’s Deep Blue in 1997.Photograph: Stan Honda/Getty Images (https://www.wired.com/story/defeated-chess-champ-garry-kasparov-made-peace-ai/)

and that he cheated a seventeen year old girl during a game of Chess.

Whatever happened to the Polgar-Kasparov footage?
https://www.ecforum.org.uk/viewtopic.php?t=6277

Judit Polgar vs Garry Kasparov
“The Late Knight Show” (game of the day Aug-25-2015)
Dos Hermanas (1996), Dos Hermanas ESP, rd 7, May-29
Sicilian Defense: Najdorf. Amsterdam Variation (B93) · 0-1
https://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1070866

IM Ronald Burnett vs IM Boris Kogan

IM Ron Burnett was profiled in an earlier post, On The Road With IM Ron Burnett, which can be found @ https://xpertchesslessons.wordpress.com/2013/08/04/on-the-road-with-im-ron-burnett/

IM Ron Burnett vs IM Boris Kogan

Fairfield Glade, Tennessee 1992

French C17

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e5 Ne7 5. Nf3 c5 6. Bd2 cxd4 7. Nb5 Bxd2+ 8.Qxd2 O-O 9. Bd3 Nbc6 10. Nbxd4 Nxd4 11. Nxd4 Nc6 12. Nf3 f6 13. exf6 Qxf6 14. O-O-O e5 15. Bb5 Be6 16. Bxc6 bxc6 17. Rde1 e4 18. Nd4 Bd7 19. f3 exf3 20. Nxf3 Bf5 21. Ne5 Rae8 22. Qe3 Be4 23. Nd7 Qf2 24. Qc3 d4 25. Qc4+ Bd5 26. Qb4 Rxe1+ 27. Rxe1 Rc8 28. Qe7 Qxg2 29. Qe5 Qg4 30. Nc5 Rf8 31. Qe7 h6 32. b3 Rf2 33. Nd7 Qf5 34. Kb2 Qxc2+ 35. Ka3 Qxa2+ 36. Kb4 Qxb3+ 37. Kc5 Qa3+ 0-1

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e5 Ne7 5. Nf3 (SF 050220 @depth 43 plays 5 Bd3; SF 11 @depth 34 prefers 5 a3. Komodo 9 @depth 28 likes 5 Bd2) 5…c5 6. Bd2 (Komodo 13.02 @depth 30 plays 6 a3, but SF 10 @depth 30 shows a move not shown at the CBDB, 6 Bd3. The move can be found over at 365Chess) 6…cxd4 (SF 11 plays the move) 7. Nb5 Bxd2+ 8.
Qxd2 O-O 9. Bd3 (Komodo prefers to 0-0-0) 9…Nbc6 10. Nbxd4 Nxd4 (Komodo plays this but SF opts for 10 …f6) 11. Nxd4 Nc6

12. Nf3 (SF 8 plays this but SF 10, given the chance, would play 12 Qe3, a TN) 12…f6 13. exf6 Qxf6 14.O-O-O (14 c4) 14…e5 15. Bb5 Be6 (15…Rd8 or Ne7)

16. Bxc6 (White should play 16 Rhe1 with about an even game) 16…bxc6 17. Rde1 (Why not Rhd1?) 17…e4 18. Nd4 Bd7 (18…c5 or Bf7) 19. f3 exf3 20. Nxf3 Bf5 21. Ne5 (He needs to double rooks) 21…Rae8 22. Qe3 (22 Nd3) 22…Be4 23. Nd7 Qf2 24. Qc3 d4 (He could move the rook to f7 or f5) 25. Qc4+ (Qb3+ is better) 25…Bd5 26. Qb4 (Qf1 looks interesting)

26…Rxe1+ (26…a5!?) 27. Rxe1 Rc8 (Maybe Qf4+ first?)

28. Qe7 28 (Qd2!=)  28…Qxg2 29. Qe5 Qg4 30. Nc5 Rf8

31. Qe7 (31 b3) 31…h6 (31…Qf4+)

32. b3 (32 Nd3 or Qxa7) 32…Rf2 33. Nd7 Qf5 34. Kb2 Qxc2+ 35. Ka3 Qxa2+ 36. Kb4 Qxb3+ 37. Kc5 Qa3+ 0-1

Max Schoenbauer (2000) vs Werner Rinkewitz (1885)

Regionalliga SW 9697 Bayern 1997

C17 French, Winawer, advance variation

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e5 c5 5.Nf3 Ne7 6.Bd2 cxd4 7.Nb5 Bxd2+ 8.Qxd2 O-O 9.Bd3 Nbc6 10.Nbxd4 Nxd4 11.Nxd4 Nc6 12.Nf3 f6 13.exf6 Qxf6 14.c3 Ne5 15.Nxe5 Qxe5+ 16.Qe2 Qxe2+ 17.Bxe2 e5 18.Rd1 Be6 19.O-O Rad8 20.Rfe1 Kf7 21.Bf3 Kf6 22.Rd2 e4 23.Bd1 Ke5 24.Rd4 Rd6 25.f3 Bf5 26.Bb3 Rfd8 27.Kf2 Kf6 28.Red1 exf3 29.gxf3 Be6 30.c4 Bf5 31.cxd5 Re8 32.R1d2 h6 33.h4 g5 34.hxg5+ hxg5 35.Kg3 Rh8 36.Rh2 Rxh2 37.Kxh2 Ke5 38.Rb4 b6 39.Kg3 Rh6 40.Rc4 Rh7 41.Rc6 Rd7 42.Rc8 Rg7 43.Rf8 Bd7 44.Ra8 Bf5 45.Re8+ Kd6 46.Rd8+ Ke5 47.Ba4 Rh7 48.d6 Rh6 49.d7 Kd6 50.Rf8 Bxd7 51.Rd8 Rh3+ 52.Kg2 Rh7 53.Bxd7 Rxd7 54.Rg8 Ke6 55.Rxg5 Rd2+ 56.Kg3 Rxb2 57.a4 a5 58.f4 Kf6 59.Rh5 Rb4 60.Kg4 Kg7 ½-½
https://www.365chess.com/game.php?back=1&gid=1089776&m=26

Stupid Republican Governor Kemp Leads Georgia Into Twilight Zone

Why Georgia Isn’t Ready to Reopen, in Charts

By Nathaniel Lash and Gus Wezerek
April 24, 2020

 

Do you see a trend? Does it appear things in the Great state of Georgia are improving? If you flip the order it may be time to reopen. Obviously things are getting worse rather than improving. Only a stupid idiot would consider reopening the economy under these conditions. Georgia REPUBLICAN Governor Brian Kemp could care less about the number of Georgia citizens who will die because of his stupidity.

One would think that when the imbecile POTUS criticizes the risky, to say the least, move by the governor, Brian Kemp would have had second thoughts about opening for business too soon, but NOooooooo! The REPUBLICAN mantra of “Death for Dollars” is in full bloom in my home state.

Experts and the President criticize Kemp’s move

Health experts have criticized the move to reopen Georgia, saying it’s too soon and risks setting off another wave of infections. President Donald Trump at first applauded Kemp for his aggressive plan to restart the economy, a source told CNN, then publicly bashed him during news briefings.

“I told the governor of Georgia, Brian Kemp, that I disagree strongly with his decision to open certain facilities,” Trump said. “But, at the same time, he must do what he thinks is right.”

https://www.cnn.com/2020/04/24/us/georgia-coronavirus-reopening-businesses-friday/index.html

Atlanta mayor: It’s like we’re living in ‘Twilight Zone’

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms

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pleads for residents to stay home, despite Governor Brian Kemp lifting shelter-in-place orders and reopening some nonessential businesses.
Source: CNN https://www.cnn.com/videos/us/2020/04/24/atlanta-mayor-keisha-lance-bottoms-reopening-georgia-newday-vpx.cnn

Georgia Governor Brian Kemp should be removed, by any means necessary, for malfeasance while in office. Georgia desperately needs a sane leader who cares more about We The People than one who obviously desires crap shooting  for dollars.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Atlanta: The City Not Too Busy To Hate

When coming of age in the metro Atlanta area in the 1960’s the capital city of the Great State of Georgia was known as “the city too busy to hate.” This was reflected upon while reading an online article at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution website. As often happens something was unintentionally found:

Four Things You Should Know about Atlanta

Andy Ambrose | Dec 1, 2006

“W.E.B. Du Bois once described Atlanta as “South of the North, yet North of the South.” As this observation suggests, Atlanta is not easily defined by regional characteristics. Geographically, it lies below the Mason-Dixon line and shares important historic, religious, and political ties with the rest of the South. Yet at times in its history the city’s orientation and behavior have been decidedly “unsouthern.”
https://www.historians.org/annual-meeting/past-meetings/supplement-to-the-121st-annual-meeting/four-things-you-should-know-about-atlanta

Inquiring minds want to know, for certain, who coined the term? The only name recalled who was constantly vilified at the time by my wrong-wing Republican relatives was Atlanta Mayor Ivan Allen.

Creator: WSB-TV (Television station : Atlanta, Ga.)
Creator: HERBERT
Title: WSB-TV newsfilm clip of governor Ernest Vandiver and mayor William B. Hartsfield responding to the full-page advertisement “An Appeal for Human Rights” published in newspapers by a student civil rights group in Atlanta, Georgia, 1960 March 9
Date: 1960 Mar. 9
Description:

“In this WSB newsfilm clip from Atlanta, Georgia on March 9, 1960, Georgia governor Ernest Vandiver and Atlanta mayor William B. Hartsfield respond to “An Appeal for Human Rights,” a full-page advertisement published in each of the Atlanta daily newspapers by the All-University Student Leadership Group, a student-led civil rights organization. The clip’s audio breaks out at several points; comments by individuals may not be completely recorded. The clip begins with governor Ernest Vandiver’s critical response to “An Appeal for Human Rights.” Referring to the advertisement as a “left-wing statement,” Vandiver calls upon “those who would cause hatred, strife, and discord” in Atlanta and in Georgia to stop their actions which he believes will benefit no one. Next, Atlanta mayor William B. Hartsfield responds to the same document and calls Atlanta “a city too busy … to hate.”
http://crdl.usg.edu/export/html/ugabma/wsbn/crdl_ugabma_wsbn_42211.html?Welcome&Welcome

I thought it nice our city was thought of as “A city too busy to hate.” Unfortunately, there was still too much hate, no matter how busy was the city. Seems there is still too much hatred in Atlanta.

‘Wuhan Plague’ plaques found on Atlanta businesses, streets

https://www.ajc.com/rf/image_lowres/Pub/p11/AJC/2020/04/22/Images/wpsign.jpg_web.jpg

By Raisa Habersham, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Hodgepodge Coffeehouse owner Krystle Rodriguez received a text from her employee about the sign: a round plaque glued to her Moreland Avenue building outside her restaurant depicting Winnie the Pooh eating a bat with chopsticks below the words “Wuhan Plague.”

The signs have been popping up around East Atlanta on a variety of buildings and fixtures. Atlanta Police Department’s Homeland Security Unit, which investigates bias-motivated crimes, has been notified about the signs but so far no arrests have been made.

“It’s doing nothing but reinforcing really awful stereotypes,” said Rodriguez, who posted a photo of the sign on her social media page to mixed reactions. “I have Asian American friends that said it’s allergy season and they’re afraid to sneeze in public because of all of the hate speech.”

Asian Americans have reported increased harassment around the globe since the novel coronavirus originated in Wuhan, China. Asians make up 4% of Atlanta’s population, according to U.S. Census data.

Advancing Justice-Atlanta, a nonprofit dedicated to protecting the civil rights of Asian American communities in Georgia and the Southeast, called the signs “hateful and dangerous rhetoric (that) has consequences.”

“Chinese Americans and those perceived to be are now victims of violence,” the organization said in a statement. “These plaques are the latest incident to harass the Asian American community and it is important we all condemn it. Hate has no place here.

For the past week, Atlanta police have received calls about the signs, which appear to be small, bronze-colored plaques that are glued in place. According to three police reports, the first was seen April 13 on an electrical box in front of 188 Waverly Way in Inman Park. Another was found on April 16 on a city lamp post near the intersection of Wylie and Flat Shoals in Reynoldstown. A third was found on the Candler Park Market on April 18.

Owners for One Moreland, the building where Hodgepodge is located, turned in a video of the sign to Atlanta police.

Atlanta police spokesman Carlos Campos said the department’s Homeland Security Unit has been notified about the plaques, but added they don’t appear to meet the criteria for a bias crime.

“If someone were to be identified as placing them, any charges would have to be looked at on a case-by-case basis, depending largely on whether any damage was done to the property to which the medallion is being affixed,” Campos said.

For the plaques to be considered a bias crime, there must be evidence the crime was committed based on the victim’s race, religion, sex, or another identifier. Because Georgia doesn’t have a hate crime statute, police would have to confer with the FBI and the U.S. Attorney’s Office before they could prosecute the case under federal hate crime laws.

Animator and muralist Rod Ben, 35, of Tucker, said the plaques overt Asian metaphors invite people to place blame for the coronavirus on those from Asian countries and Asian American residents.

“No one feels safe,” said Ben, who is Cambodian and Vietnamese. “I’m worried for my parents going to the grocery store. Even older people are being harassed and attack, and if you’re not going to leave old people alone, where is (the harassment) going to stop?”

Ben also took his daughter out of daycare because he was worried about the way people looked at her during the pandemic.

“Yes, we’re Asian, but we’re Asian Americans. I’ve never been to China,” he said. “To make these connections based on what someone looks like is crazy. It’s the first time some of us have considered buying a gun because we don’t feel safe.”

“People have gotten on me for not wearing a mask and some immediately see me and move, which is good because you should be social distancing,” Ben said. “But when I see other people walking past them and they don’t react that way, I can only come to the conclusion that they’re scared of me.”

While no arrests have been made in the incidents, Rodriquez and Ben both hope the culprits get more education about xenophobia and how it affects people.

“We need to have more of a nuanced conversation about what’s really going on,” Rodriquez said. “I think more than anything there needs to be a real conversation about how powerful words and ignorance can be.”
https://www.ajc.com/news/local/wuhan-plague-plaques-found-atlanta-businesses-streets/b9takSWmtKqfqai7wAk8iL/