For Chess Parents, There Is No Endgame.

Prodigal Sons
The search for the next great chess prodigy—the next Bobby Fischer—is constantly underway. And the candidates are getting younger and younger.
By David Hill Dec 20, 2017, 10:00am EST

A most disquieting Chess article was published recently at The Ringer, “An SB Nation affiliate site.” David Hill is a “Chess dad.” His seven year old son, Gus, plays Chess in New York city.

https://www.theringer.com/sports/2017/12/20/16796672/chess-prodigy-misha-osipov-bobby-fischer

The article begins:

Anatoly Karpov, the 66-year-old former World Chess Champion, was comfortable playing chess underneath the bright lights and in front of the cameras on a television studio set. His opponent, Mikhail “Misha” Osipov, had never played on quite so big a stage before. In this case, before a studio audience on the Russian television program The Best, broadcast on the state-run Channel One. Nevertheless, Osipov looked comfortable. He greeted Karpov warmly, and complimented his showdown with Viktor Korchnoi, which Osipov had studied to prepare. (“It was a beautiful game!”) Osipov played the Nimzo-Indian defense, and played it well.

But Osipov took a long time to consider each move, while Karpov played quickly. Their game was timed, with Karpov playing with two minutes on his clock to Osipov’s 10, in consideration of Karpov’s superior skill and experience. That time advantage dwindled as Osipov spent precious minutes thinking.

Fourteen moves into the game and they were equal in time, with Karpov up a single pawn. Graciously, Karpov offered Osipov a draw.

“Nyet,” Osipov responded, and continued to move.

A few moves later, Osipov’s clock ran out.

“You’ve lost on time,” Karpov told Osipov. “You had to accept the draw. Be more realistic about time.”

Osipov shook Karpov’s hand, but his face tensed up and fixed itself into a frown. He got up from his seat and wandered toward the studio audience, no longer able to hold back tears. Osipov sobbed wildly and looked into the bright lights and the audience before him, bewildered.

“Mama!” he shouted as the cameras continued to roll. “Mama!” His mother bounded from the audience onto the stage and picked up the 3-year-old boy into her arms and held him tightly, wiping the tears from his round, cherubic face.

Despite the disappointing result, Misha Osipov remains a media sensation in Russia. His favorite player is Magnus Carlsen, the current World Champion and himself a child prodigy. According to Yuri, Misha found the games of former Russian World Champion Vladimir Kramnik to be a little boring. By contrast, young Misha found the games of Bobby Fischer to be exciting.

The now-4-year-old from Moscow has already beaten a grandmaster (albeit one with poor eyesight and not exactly in his prime at 95 years old) and has won a number of youth tournament titles. Osipov already has two coaches and a corporate sponsor. He’s helping revitalize Russian interest in a game that was once a source of national pride, a revitalization that began last year when Russian Sergey Karjakin played Norwegian Magnus Carlsen for the World Championship. Both Karjakin and Carlsen were chess prodigies themselves, and Karjakin holds the record for being the youngest player to become a grandmaster. Neither of them could play chess at the age of 3.

I asked Yuri Osipov how he felt watching his little boy cry that day, after he’d lost to Anatoly Karpov. Yuri said it surprised him. It was very unlike Misha to cry. After all, it wasn’t his first time losing a game. But after speaking with Misha after the show, he realized that his son had never played with an analog clock before, only digital. Misha didn’t know how to read the time on the clock and had no idea he was so short on time. When Misha’s clock ran out of time, it surprised him. “He was upset and cried because he didn’t understand why he lost,” Yuri said. “He cried because he didn’t understand that the time was over.”

After Misha lost to Karpov and bawled his adorable eyes out on television, the video went viral. I found it on YouTube with my son while we scrolled through videos about the Philidor position in the endgame. It affected us both. Me because my heart broke for the little boy, calling out for his mama, confused and afraid. Gus because he felt jealous that such a little kid could get to play chess against a former World Champion. If Gus had been there, he assured me, he would not have cried.

He adds a coda to the Nicholas Nip story:

In the months following Nip’s achievement, he went on Live! With Regis and Kelly to play a simultaneous exhibition—he’d play 10 opponents at the same time. The young boy in a too-large green polo shirt won nine and drew one. Afterward Regis Philbin pestered him with questions about whether he wanted a girlfriend. Kelly Ripa asked him if it was too late for someone her age to learn to play chess. Nip replied, “No, it’s not too late.” “What if we are not smart?” Ripa responded. “No, you can still play,” he said, nervously, looking side to side as if trying to find a way out.

A few months after his television appearance, Nicholas Nip told his parents he no longer wanted to play chess. He retired from the game in the fourth grade. He hasn’t been seen at a chess tournament since.

And the story, with which I was unfamiliar, of, “a 5-year-old boy named Ernest Kim.”

Fischer’s rise as a young player gave the Soviet Union chess machine fits. During the years that Fischer came up in the United States, gaining international attention for winning the U.S. Championship at the age of 14, the Soviets recruited thousands of new children to attend their chess schools. One of them was a 5-year-old boy named Ernest Kim. The USSR claimed Kim was defeating adults in his home of Tashkent and had climbed to a “third category rating,” the first rung on the ladder to becoming a Soviet grandmaster, within six months of learning the game. Photos of Kim appeared on magazine covers, newsreels circulated with footage of him playing against adults, sitting up on his knees with his tiny head in his hands. In 1958, when Fischer visited Moscow on invitation from the USSR chess authority, he declared that he was eager to play Kim. The government kept the child under wraps.

One Soviet chess player, Vasily Panov, railed against the chess centers in general, and the treatment of Kim in particular. He felt that too many young people were being put through the Soviet chess farm team, possibly sacrificing some future doctors or engineers in the process. In an interview with The New York Times, in speaking about Ernest Kim, who Panov said was being “dragged off to training sessions, away from playmates and school,” Panov quoted Lenin: “Do not forget that chess after all is only a recreation and not an occupation.”

In addition the author writes about Josh Waitzkin. I urge you to read the whole piece.

“My son isn’t as good at chess as Misha Osipov or Josh Waitzkin, but I still see Fred and Yuri as my brothers. Being a chess parent is full of moments like this one. As I sit and wait for Gus to return from a tournament game, where parents are wisely not allowed to sit and spectate, I grind my teeth and pace the floor. I wonder—If I can’t handle the pressure, if I’m this nervous, then how must he feel? And why do I put him through this? Could he possibly be enjoying this, or is he just doing it because he thinks it will please me?

Jerry Nash has been a tournament director at scholastic tournaments throughout the country. He sees kids crying all the time. So what? “My wife teaches elementary school. She’ll tell you, they cry in class, too.” More often than not, the children deal with losses against tougher opponents by getting excited, rather than discouraged, he tells me. This is how you can tell apart those who are right for the game and those who aren’t. “Sometimes the parent is the only one that’s nervous.”

In my case, it’s pretty much all the time. I stare at the door waiting for him to return, hoping to be able to read his facial expressions for a sense of whether he won or lost before he makes it down the hall so I can mentally prepare for my own reaction when he reaches me and gives me the news.

For chess parents, there is no endgame. There are few opportunities in America for college scholarships for chess players, and almost all of them are snatched up by grandmasters from other countries. There is no way for most grandmasters to make a decent living as professionals, save for the very few at the top. The top five chess players in the world earn millions from tournaments, but the earnings fall sharply once you get outside of the top 10. For the vast majority of adult chess players who stay committed to their study and pursuit of the game, the only way to earn money at chess comes from doling out lessons and taking home a few hundred bucks from the occasional tournament. There is nothing glamorous about it.”

Arguably, the most profound Chess article of the year.

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Ellie Goulding Plays Chess with a Heart of Gold

Ellie Goulding looks effortlessly stylish in grey shirt and skinny jeans as she helps prepare Christmas feast at homeless shelter

By Connie Rusk For Mailonline

Published: 13:55 EST, 23 December 2017 | Updated: 14:48 EST, 23 December 2017

She hosted her annual star-studded benefit concert for homelessness earlier this month.

And Ellie Goulding proved she has a heart of gold as she paid a visit to a Crisis homeless shelter on Saturday.

The 30-year-old Burn songstress rocked a casual look, pairing a puffed sleeve grey shirt with skinny black jeans.


Giving back to the community: Ellie Goulding proved she has a heart of gold as she paid a visit to a homeless shelter on Saturday


Concentration: The Starry Eyed songstress appeared full of festive cheer as she chatted away to volunteers before taking part in a chess game

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-5208609/Ellie-Goulding-visits-Crisis-homeless-shelter.html

Hey, that is NOT CHESS!

True Champion Anna Muzychuk REFUSES to defend her title in Saudi Arabia

Double world chess champion, 27, REFUSES to defend her title in Saudi Arabia in defiance of the full-length robes women are required to wear in the kingdom

Anna Muzychuk, 27, is World Champion of two chess disciplines
The Ukrainian has refused to play in this year’s championship
It is being held in Saudi Arabia where women are routinely oppressed
She says her refusal is in response to gender inequality in Saudi Arabia

By Sara Malm For Mailonline

Published: 11:59 EST, 26 December 2017 | Updated: 12:05 EST, 26 December 2017

A reigning chess World Champion is refusing to defend her title’s in this weeks world tournament because it is being held in Saudi Arabia where women are living under oppression.

Anna Muzychuk, 27, from Lviv, Ukraine is the World No 1 in two speed disciplines – rapid and blitz – and shocked the chess world when she announced that she would not be competing in the championships.

Ms Muzychuk said it would go against her principles to subject herself to the Saudi Arabian laws which requires women to cover themselves and not walk unaccompanied in public.


True champion: Anna Muzychuk, 27, from Ukraine, says it would go against her principles to subject herself to the Saudi Arabian laws which requires women to cover themselves

‘In a few days I am going to lose two World Champion titles – one by one. Just because I decided not to go to Saudi Arabia,’ Ms Muzychuk wrote in a statement on her Facebook.

‘Not to play by someone’s rules, not to wear abaya, not to be accompanied getting outside, and altogether not to feel myself a secondary creature.

‘Exactly one year ago I won these two titles and was about the happiest person in the chess world but this time I feel really bad. I am ready to stand for my principles and skip the event, where in five days I was expected to earn more than I do in a dozen of events combined.

‘All that is annoying, but the most upsetting thing is that almost nobody really cares. That is a really bitter feeling, still not the one to change my opinion and my principles.’


Defining: Ms Muzychuk is seen during the Women’s World Chess Championship 2017 at Espinas Palace Hotel in Tehran, Iran in March

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5213169/World-chess-champ-REFUSES-defend-title-Saudi-Arabia.html#ixzz52TZ5L9vS

Magnus Carlsen Superman

The World Human Chess Champion, Magnus Carlsen, did not win the recently completed London Chess Classic. Although he may have lost a battle he won the war by taking the Grand Chess Tour.

One of the headlines at the Chessbase website during the tournament proclaimed, London Chess Classic: Magnus on tilt. (https://en.chessbase.com/post/london-chess-classic-round-8)

The article, by Macauley Peterson, began:

“Round 8 saw a startling blunder from the World Champion whose frustration following the game was palpable.”

Later we fans of the Royal Game read this:

Round 8

“For the first few hours of Sunday’s games, it looked like we could be heading for another day of peaceful results. Adams vs Aronian and Vachier-Lagrave vs Anand both ended in early draws, and the remaining games were level. Suddenly, a shock blunder from World Champion Magnus Carlsen flashed up on the screens, a variation which lead to Ian Nepomniachtchi being up a piece, and easily winning. Carlsen resigned just four moves later.

After the game, a visibly frustrated World Champion stepped into the live webcast interview zone for a contractually obligated webcast standup with Grand Chess Tour commentator GM Maurice Ashley.

These occur in the same conference room in which a live audience enjoys commentary during the round, and around 150 people were crowded into the room to hear from Carlsen.”

Whoa! Let us stop right here and consider what we have just read…

“…a visibly frustrated World Champion stepped into the live webcast interview zone for a contractually obligated webcast standup…” I believe the word “interview” should be inserted after “standup.”

Why would anyone in their right mind put something in any contract, in any game or sport, forcing a player who has just lost to be interviewed by anyone BEFORE THEY HAVE HAD A CHANCE TO DECOMPRESS?! This is incomprehensible, and the sanity of those responsible for forcing anyone to sign a contract that requires the person to be interviewed before having a chance to compose themselves must be questioned.

The article continues:

“A few moments before they were to go on air, Ashley casually reached over to adjust the collar on Carlsen’s sport coat, which had become turned outward awkwardly. Magnus reacted by violently throwing his arms up in the air, silently but forcefully saying “don’t touch me”, and striking Ashley in the process. Maurice was, naturally, taken aback but just seconds later he received the queue that he was live.”

Maurice is a GM, and a pro, not only when it comes to playing Chess, but also when it gets down to interviewing tightly wound Chess players. Since he played the Royal game at the highest level he knows the emotions it can, and does, evoke first hand. Maurice was the first one to ‘fergettaboutit.’

I recall a time during a tournament when a young fellow playing in his first tournament lost control of his emotions and, shall we say, “flared-up.” His mother was aghast, and appalled, saying, “Now you will never be able to come here again.” Since I had given lessons at the school the boy attended I stepped in saying, “Ma’am, that’s not the way it works around here. By the next time your son comes here everyone will have forgotten what happened today.” The mother gave me the strangest look before asking, “Are you just saying that to make me feel better?” I assured her I was not and then someone else interjected, telling her, with a large grin on his face, that I was indeed telling her the truth. Chess people, to their credit, are about the most forgiving people one will ever know.

There followed:

Magnus was clearly in no mood to chat:

“I missed everything. There’s not much else to say. I think I failed to predict a single of his moves, and then, well, you saw what happened.”

“It will be interesting to see if Magnus will recover tomorrow. When asked for his thoughts on the last round pairing he replied, “I don’t care at all. “Black against Levon Aronian will be no easy task, with that attitude.”

The excellent annotation of the game Magnus lost to Ian Nepomniachtchi

on Chessbase is by GM by Tiger Hillarp-Persson,

who has also annotated games of Go on his blog (https://tiger.bagofcats.net/). After move 29 Tiger writes, “There were probably a few who thought Magnus would win at this stage…”

Magnus begins going wrong at move 30. He then gives a line and writes, “White is dominating. It is quite out of character for Carlsen to miss something like this. It seems like he wasn’t able to think clearly today.”

Before Magnus plays his 33rd move Tiger writes, “Now White’s pieces are all in the wrong places.”

After White’s 34th move Tiger writes, “Here Carlsen seems to lose his will to fight. Now one mistake follows another.”

Those are very STRONG WORDS! Human World Chess Champions, with the exception of Garry Kasparov when losing to Deep Blue,

do not lose their will to fight!

Yuri Averbakh,

Russian GM, and author, in a 1997 article in New in Chess magazine, the best Chess magazine of ALL TIME, placed chess players into 6 categories; Killers; Fighters; Sportsmen; Gamblers; Artists; and Explorers. Although he listed only Kasparov and Bronstein

as “Fighters,” the World Chess Champion best known for being a “Fighter” was Emanuel Lasker.

I would put current human World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen in the class with Lasker as a “Fighter.”

In an interview at the Chess24 website his opponent in the game, Ian Nepomniachtchi,


had this to say, “To be fair, Magnus had a bad cold during the second half of the tournament and therefore wasn’t in his very best form.”

Nepo is extremely gracious while explaining why Magnus “…seemed to lose his will to fight.” When one is under the weather it is extremely difficult to think clearly, especially as the game goes on and fatigue begins to dominate. Imagine what history would have recorded if Bobby Fischer had not caught a cold after the first few games against former World Chess Champion Tigran Petrosian.

This was a topic of conversation during a meal with Petrosian, Paul Keres,

and future World Chess Champion Anatoly Karpov,

at a restaurant in San Antonio, the Golden Egg, during the Church’s Fried Chicken tournament in 1972.

Interviewer Colin McGourty asked Nepo this question:

“It seems as though he’s stopped dominating as he did a few years ago. Is that the case?

A few years ago the level he was demonstrating was out of this world, particularly when he wasn’t yet World Champion, plus at times good patches in his career alternated with even better ones. Gradually, though, people have got used to him, and when you’ve already achieved it all, when over the course of a few years you’ve been better than everyone, it gets tougher to motivate yourself. That doesn’t just apply to sport, after all. Magnus has a great deal of interests outside of chess, but even his relatively unsuccessful periods are much more successful than for many of his rivals. Even in what generally wasn’t the tournament of his life he beat Aronian with Black in the final round and finished third i.e. he performed very decently.”

https://chess24.com/en/read/news/nepomniachtchi-on-london-carlsen-and-alphazero

There you have it. “Even in what generally wasn’t the tournament of his life he beat Aronian with Black in the final round and finished third i.e. he performed very decently.”

Levon had the year of his life in 2017. He had the White pieces in the last round against a weakened World Champion. He could have ended the year in style with a victory. This from Chessbase:

The Magnus bounce

“The World Champion, after a troubling performance yesterday, appeared once more to be on the brink of defeat with the black pieces against Levon Aronian. Carlsen was considerably worse in the middlegame, but it took just a couple of inaccuracies from Aronian for the World Champion to completely turn the tables. He went on to win, despite knowing that a draw would be enough to clinch first place in the Grand Chess Tour standings.

In fact, Aronian offered Carlsen a draw, right after the time control, which Magnus refused, as he was already much better in the position. It was the 11th time in 17 tries that Carlsen came back with a win immediately following a loss, since 2015.” (https://en.chessbase.com/post/london-chess-classic-2017-carlsen-wins-grand-chess-tour)

Many years ago IM Boris Kogan told me the measure of a Chess player is how he responds to a loss. Many in the same condition would have been happy to settle for a draw in the last round. Some would have made it a quick draw. Not Magnus!
Magnus Carlsen is a worthy World Champion. My admiration for our World Champion has grown immensely.

Consider this headline from the official tournament website:

Round 8 – Carlsen Car Crash at the Classic

11.12.17 – John Saunders reports: The eighth round of the 9th London Chess Classic was played on Sunday 10 December 2017 at the Olympia Conference Centre. The round featured just the one decisive game, which was a disastrous loss for Carlsen, as the result of two terrible blunders.
http://www.londonchessclassic.com/downloads/reports17/2017-12-10%20LCC%20Round%208.pdf

As bad as that is, it could have been much worse. Even when completely well Magnus has sometimes gotten into trouble early in the game, especially when playing an opening some consider “offbeat.” Every true human World Chess Champion, one who beat the previous title holder in a match, was a trend setter who was emulated by other players of all ranks and abilities. Simply because Magnus opened with the Bird against Mickey Adams

in round seven other players may now begin opening games with 1 f4. It is true that Magnus got into trouble in the opening of that game, but his opponent was unable to take advantage of it and Magnus FOUGHT his way out of trouble. (see the excellent article, including annotations to The Bird game, by Alex Yermolinsky at Chessbase: https://en.chessbase.com/post/london-classic-nepomniachtchi-joins-lead)

As Macauley Peterson

wrote, “Black against Levon Aronian will be no easy task…” That is Black in the LAST ROUND against the player who this year has stolen Magnus Carlsen’s thunder. An obviously under the weather Magnus had Black versus a man who believes he should be the human World Chess Champion. If there were no FIDE (we can only dream…) and things were like they were before World War II, Levon Aronian would have absolutely no trouble whatsoever finding backers for a match with Magnus Carlsen. The outcome of the game could have psychological ramifications for some time to come.

Levon held an advantage through 34 moves, but let it slip with an ill-advised pawn push on his 35th move.


Position before 35. b6

The game ws then even. The player who fought best would win the game. That player was Magnus ‘The Fighter’ Carlsen. The loss must have shattered Levon Aronian’s psyche; there is no other way to put it. Levon had White against a weakened World Champion yet he did not even manage to make a draw. That fact has to be devastating to Aronian. Oh well, Levon has a pretty wife…

MAGNUS CARLSEN AND THE UNOFFICIAL STANDING UP RULE

I have been enjoying Insanity, passion, and addiction: a year inside the chess world by GM Gormally and would like to share some thoughts with you. From the book:

MAGNUS CARLSEN AND THE UNOFFICIAL STANDING UP RULE

“I’ve done pretty well so far – I’ve yet to mention our esteemed world champion, Mr Magnus Oen Carlsen. He has such an all-pervading influence on the chess scene now, that it’s extremely difficult to get through an entire chess book without mentioning him at least once.
As much as I admire the young Norwegian, one particular habit he has seems to have been picked up by others. That is, to hover over the board when it’s your opponents turn to move. Now I know it’s not against FIDE rules to do this. At least I don’t think it is. But I do think it’s rather annoying, when you are trying to concentrate, to have your opponent standing in your immediate vision, like he’s giving a simul. I’m told that all the young Norwegian players now do this, in honour of their hero. And not just Norwegians. I let t get to me in round three in Plancoet. Early on in the game, it wasn’t really a problem. But towards the end of the game my opponent kept standing up at the board, which as my position was beginning to deteriorate, started to annoy me. I started to wave my hands in his general direction, in obvious annoyance. “What is your problem?” came the aggressive retort. After that he seemed to sit down a bit more, but perhaps it was too late as my will had been broken. The standing up pose had claimed yet another victim.”

Before writing the above GM Gormally had informed us that he had informed the TD he was withdrawing from the tournament, but then “…decided to play the round three game where I was paired with a 1940 player.” Gormally lost the game without even mentioning the 1940 players name! At the very least this is an egregious slight of his opponent. He lost because he neglected to show his lower rated opponent R-E-S-P-E-C-T. Gormally lost because he stop thinking and made several BAD MOVES. He writes, “It’s very difficult to play a chess game when you’re affected by anger. It completely breaks up your concentration.” Gormally was “…affected by anger” because he could not control his emotions. The best Chess players are the ones who can best control their emotions, and Magnus Oen Carlsen is the World Champion because he controls his emotions better than his contemporaries.

The above brought two things to mind. During a tournament I got up to stretch my legs. While wandering around looking at some of the other games I stopped at the board of one legendary Georgia player. I had only been standing at his board a few moments while surveying his irretrievably damaged position when suddenly the legendary one erupted from his chair, gesticulating wildly, while snorting and stamping like a bull before charging a red flag. I moved on as quickly as humanly possible…

It also brought to mind an incident at the 2002 US Open. I was playing an Expert, Herman Chiu, a rather small, scrawny, pipsqueak in the third round. I was “on par” after losing to a NM in the first round and winning against a ‘C’ player in the second round. I recall it being my move while having a decent position when I was kicked under the table. I looked up at my opponent, who grinned. My concentration had been broken, but I tried to put it out of my mind and refocus on the game, thinking the kick inadvertent and the grin demented, when I was again kicked. Once again Herman had a shit-eatin’ grin on his face. There was absolutely no doubt in my mind that this weasel had kicked me intentionally, so I left the board to find a TD. I cannot recall the name of the gentleman with whom I discussed the situation, but he did not want to be bothered, so I went back to the board. I made a move without again being kicked, but when next on move I was once again kicked. This time I found Carol Jarecki, who came to the board with me, and stayed there until I had made my move without being kicked. She left, he moved, and when next my turn, I was again kicked! I went to Carol again and told her in no uncertain terms that if the asshole kicked me again I may lose control with one of us dead and the other in prison! Hearing this Carol returned to the table and talked with Herman. By now I was LIVID! After a couple of weak moves my position degenerated to the level of my opponents behavior and I went down in flames. At least I was not kicked again…

Word got around the tournament and several players whom I had never met came to me to commiserate, informing me that the “little creep” had previously kicked them underneath the table. I lost my cool, letting my temper flare, when what I should have done was to have walked over to his side of the board and slammed his head into the board several times, letting out my rage, before continuing the game. Just kidding, I think… I will admit that when informed Herman had died I grinned, while thinking, “I out lived the cretin.”

I followed GM Gormally’s progress in the London Classic Open. He began the tournament as the 29th ranking player and finished tied for 10th place with a score of 6 1/2 – 2 1/2. His PR of 2460 was just below his official FIDE rating of 2477.

Gormally was on the wrong side of the Najdorf in the final round but won. When the move 6 Qe2 appeared on the board

at TWIC I thought it must be a mistake. Maybe I’ve been away from Chess too long, or at least away from the Najdorf, my first real Chess love, too long, I thought. The CBDB shows 19 different moves for White against the Najdorf, but if we throw out 5 rarely played moves, there are 14 plausible moves for the wrong side to fire at a Najdorf player. Qe2 is a little below Qd3, but slightly above a3 & h4, if that tells you anything. If you’ve read the AW you know how much I like the Qe2 move…but against the Najdorf? I was frightened by the idea of sitting down at the board and having some whipper snapper fire the Qe2 salvo at my Najdorf as I sat there pondering about whether it was the latest attempt with reams of analysis I did not know, or simply an over the board inspiration conjured up by the fertile your mind sitting across from the AW…

Gormally, Daniel W (ENG) – Van Delft, Merijn (NED)

London Chess Classic Open 2017 round 09

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Qe2 e5 7. Nb3 Be6 8. Bd2 Nbd7 9. O-O-O Be7 10. Rg1 b5 11. g4 Nb6 12. f4 exf4 13. g5 Nfd7 14. Bxf4 Nc4 15. Nd5 Bxd5 16. exd5 O-O 17. Nd4 Nde5 18. Kb1 Re8 19. Bc1 Bf8 20. h4 g6 21. h5 Bg7 22. hxg6 hxg6 23. Rh1 Nxb2 24. Bxb2 Nc4 25. Qf3 Nxb2 26. Kxb2 Qxg5 27. Rh3 Rac8 28. c3 Rc5 29. Rg3 Qxd5 30. Qxd5 Rxd5 31. Kb3 Rc5 32. Bh3 Ree5 33. Rgd3 a5 34. a3 Bf8 35. Bd7 Kg7 36. Rf3 a4+ 37. Kc2 Kg8 38. Rdf1 Bg7 39. Rxf7 Re3 40. Rxg7+ Kxg7 41. Ne6+ Rxe6 42. Bxe6 1-0

Checking with the usual places, the CBDB and 365Chess I learned that players in the BC age played 7 Nf5 after 6…e5, but that the “engines” prefer 7 Nb3. Seems our man Gormally has been hitting the “engines.” I could fond only one other game with & Nbe:

Watson, PR. vs Aslett, Alec
Event: Combined Services-ch
Site: England Date: 2002
Round: 7
ECO: B90 Sicilian, Najdorf

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 a6 5. Nc3 Nf6 6. Qe2 e5 7. Nb3 Be6 8. Bg5 Nbd7 9. g3 Qc7 10. Bg2 Rc8 11. O-O-O Bc4 12. Qd2 b5 13. Nd5 Nxd5 14. exd5 Bxb3 15. axb3 h6 16. Be3 f5 17. h4 Be7 18. Kb1 Nf6 19. Bh3 g6 20. h5 O-O 21. hxg6 Ne4 22. Qd3 Nc5 23. Bxc5 e4 24. Qd2 dxc5 25. d6 Bxd6 26. Qxd6 Qg7 27. Bxf5 c4 28. Bxc8 1-0

South Carolina Senior Chess Championship

Mr. Gene Nix is the President of the Greenville, South Carolina, Chess Club included the AW in his latest mailing even though I was unable to participate in the tournament much to my regret. I asked if it could be used by the AW and I got a kick out of his reply:

Good afternoon Michael!
Certainly! That is, I mean you may use it.
Gene

There is nothing the AW can add to Gene’s report, so, without further adieu, the complete newsletter:

Greenville Chess Club: http://www.greenvillechessclub.org

December 20, 2017

Happy first week of winter, Greenville chess mongers of all ages, venerable and otherwise! Did you know the SC Senior Open happened this past weekend?! Here’s what happened:

9th Annual South Carolina Senior Open, December 16-17, 2017
Nineteen venerable gentlemen from South Carolina, North Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama, and Virginia converged on the Hampton Inn at I-385 in Greenville, SC, to resolve the matter of senior dominance at the chess board in South Carolina!
Accelerated pairings left only two perfect 2-0 scores going into the Sunday rounds, setting the pieces for a Master-level showdown in the final round between leader Life Master Peter Bereolos of Tennessee, and South Carolina legend Life Master Klaus Pohl. The Tennessee Master finally prevailed for the tournament win, while Daniel Quigley won a ratings upset over past NC Senior Champion Michael Kliber two boards down to take the SC Senior Championship trophy and title, and to share second & third places with Dr. Clark Brown of Georgia! The U1600 leaders finished with a five-way tie at 2-2, with Michael Meekins taking the SC U1600 Senior trophy, which award was established on-site and which object is on order for delivery forthwith! The contending field included also from South Carolina John Haymond (returning to competition this year after a too long break), Lee Marinelli and Dean Creech; and from North Carolina Michael Matson, Joseph Quinlan, Wayne Spon, Bruce Roth, Debs Pedigo, Mike Eberhardinger, and Harold Zeltner; and Ray Downs from Alabama; and Steven Boshears from Georgia, and from Virginia was Rob Mahan, a fellow organizer of Senior tournaments!
South Carolina Senior Champion Daniel Quigley will receive an invitation and a stipend to compete in the Tournament of Senior State Champions next July in Madison, Wisconsin, alongside the US Open, to include a half-off entry into the US Open itself afterward. The development of this new event derives from SCCA President David Grimaud’s work as the US Chess Senior Committee President!
Warmest thanks go to the staff of the Hampton Inn for their responsive service, and to Business Manager Ms. Jessica Dillard for her close management of guest room matters. Special thanks go to Mr. Grimaud and Precision Tune Auto Care for their generous sponsorship of this and other SC tournaments, and to some unnamed, anonymous, and undisclosed donors who added funds to augment the U1600 prizes, to include an Under-1600 SC trophy! Local TD Gene Nix organized and officiated.

This week, Thursday: Rated Blitz, G/3, +2, starting 7:45 PM at Barnes & Noble on Haywood Road. Double or single RR in sections as applicable and useful. Pleeeeeeeaaaaassssse: be there in time to enter so we start on time!

Children’s chess – please note the change: Alternating Wednesdays, 6-7:30 – Boardwalk!! Next meeting Wednesday, January 3, 2018!
Mr. Doug Peterson moderates chess gatherings of young players on alternating Wednesdays at various sites in the area (mostly Boardwalk game store near Haywood Mall, but occasionally Barnes & Noble on Haywood, or Pelham Rd Library). If you’re interested, please contact me and I will put you in contact! Or just show up!

We’re a much better behaved chess mob of late, for which I am personally grateful. We must please continue to:

1. Respect the other paying customers’ right to tables. We must also be paying customers – buy a coffee and/or donut, or anything.
2. Please bring sets and clocks.
3. Please supervise your children. We have been too loud in the past.
4. Store regulations do not permit outside food and drinks. Obvious exceptions would be infant food and medically prescribed items.

Your next best moves, in the local area:
Jan 13: GSSM January Open, Hartsville, SC
Jan 20: CCCSA Reverse Angle 80
Jan 26-28: Land of the Sky XXXI, Asheville, NC
Feb 3: CCCSA G/60 Action
Feb 17: CCCSA Reverse Angle 81
Mar 24: CCCSA Reverse Angle 82
Apr 7:CCCSA G/60 Action
Apr 21: CCCSA Reverse Angle 83
Disclaimer: Please verify the tournament before you travel, as schedules do change.

The Spartanburg Chess Club meets Tuesday evenings, 7-10PM, at Spartanburg Community College’s Tyger River campus. Monthly rated G/15 first Tuesdays, and other events elsewhen. Contact: Will Brown, will@willandhelen.org

The Clemson Chess Club meets Tuesdays, 7-10PM, at the Calhoun Court commons basement on campus. POC: Eric Zuberi, ezuberi@g.clemson.edu

The Charlotte Chess Club meets every Wednesday evening at McAlister’s Deli, presided by National Master Leland Fuerstman: http://www.charlottechess.com .

Boiling Springs CC meets Saturdays, 10AM, at the Boiling Springs library. POC: Jack Adamo, jacka@jackadamo.com

Find us online!
Greenville Chess Club: http://www.greenvillechessclub.org/index.html
(Send in your memorable games for posting!)
Facebook: Greenville Chess Club – SC
SC Chess Association: http://www.scchess.org
NC Chess Association: http://www.ncchess.org/index.html
Georgia Chess Association: http://www.georgiachess.org
USCF: uschess.org

“Life like chess is about knowing to do the right move at the right time.” – Kaleb Rivera

Gene Nix
President, Greenville Chess Club
Treasurer, SC Chess Association
Life Member, USCF
864-905-2406; eenixjr@yahoo.com

London’s ‘pawnographic’ World Chess Championship logo

The headline in The Telegraph reads:

Grandmasters complain London’s ‘pawnographic’ World Chess Championship logo looks like the Kama Sutra


The new logo for the 2017 World Chess Championship in London

By Leon Watson

19 December 2017 • 4:54 PM

The unveiling of a logo for a big sporting contest is meant to be a grand occasion that builds up a flurry of excitement.

Yet for the next World Chess Championship the organisers may have gone a bit too far in trying to set pulses racing.

When their “trendy” new logo was revealed for next year’s flagship event in London it was met with a rather passionate response among grandmasters.

The chosen image shows two chequered bodies entwined around a chess board. It is, World Chess say, unashamedly sexual. Perhaps, one could even say, pawnographic.

“No, this is not a joke,” said Australian international David Smerdon on Twitter, before adding: “You had one job!”

The British Grandmaster Nigel Short, a long-time critic of the game’s governing body Fide, said the organisers were “perhaps suggesting that they are giving the chess world a good f——.”


World chess champion Magnus Carlsen (left) and London Evening Standard Editor George Osborne announcing the city as the host of the 2018 FIDE World Chess Championship

And Grandmaster Susan Polgar, the pioneer of women’s chess, questioned whether the racy image was appropriate for children.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/12/19/grandmasters-complain-londons-world-chess-championship-logo/amp/?__twitter_impression=true