IM Daniel Gurevich Second Place Tie at the St Louis Invitational

IM Daniel Gurevich “cut his eye teeth,” as we say in the South, at the Atlanta Chess & Game Center, aka, the House of Pain.

I made a point to be near the first board game of the last round of the K-6 section when Daniel took clear first in the Supernationals at Opryland in Nashville back in 2009 and I was the first one to congratulate him. He was beaming and his face broke into a big smile as he took my proffered hand. His score of six and a half out of seven games raised his rating from 2075 to 2104, and it has not stopped rising. His FIDE page shows his current FIDE rating as 2471. It will continuing heading upward after his second place finish, tied with four others, in the GM section of the recently concluded St. Louis Invitational, with a undefeated score of plus two, both wins coming with the black pieces. The final crosstable shown at the website of the STLCC (https://www.uschesschamps.com/2017-saint-louis-invitational/pairings-results-gm) shows Daniel with the second highest performance rating (2563) behind only that of tournament winner IM John Burke (2606).

I would like to present all of Daniel’s games at the tournament, some of which I was fortunate enough to watch (“You GOTTA pull for somebody, man!” – David Spinks); all of which I have played over.

Two games annotated by his opponents follow below the games. The first game, which I enjoyed immensely, could be called a “real barn burner!” The ChessBomb shows a plethora of “red moves,” but then most fighting games are repleat with “off-color” moves, are they not?

IM Daniel Gurevich (2471) v IM Aman Hambleton (2484)

Rd 1

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 e6 3. c4 d5 4. Nc3 Bb4 5. cxd5 exd5 6. Bg5 h6 7. Bh4 O-O 8. e3
Bf5 9. Bd3 Bxd3 10. Qxd3 c6 11. a3 Be7 12. Bxf6 Bxf6 13. h4 g6 14. h5 g5 15.
Ne2 Nd7 16. Ng3 Bg7 17. Nf5 a5 18. Nd2 Re8 19. f3 c5 20. O-O Qb6 21. f4 g4 22.
dxc5 Nxc5 23. Qe2 Qxb2 24. Qxg4 Kh8 25. Rab1 Qf6 26. Rb5 Bf8 27. Rf3 Ne4 28.
Nxe4 dxe4 29. Rg3 Bxa3 30. Rb6 Re6 31. Rxb7 a4 32. Ra7 Ree8 33. Rc7 Bb2 34. Nd6
Qxd6 35. Rxf7 Rg8 36. Qf5 Bg7 37. Rg6 Qxg6 38. hxg6 a3 39. Qh5 Rge8 40. Rxg7
Kxg7 41. Qd5 Kxg6 42. Qd6+ Kf7 43. Qd7+ Kf6 44. Qd4+ Kf7 45. Qd7+ Kf6 46. Qd4+
1/2-1/2

White: IM Raven Sturt (2449)

Rd 2

1. d4 d5 2. c4 dxc4 3. e4 Nf6 4. e5 Nd5 5. Bxc4 Nc6 6. Ne2 Nb6 7. Bb3 Bf5 8.
Nbc3 e6 9. O-O Qd7 10. Be3 O-O-O 11. a3 f6 12. exf6 gxf6 13. Ng3 Bg6 14. Qf3
Be7 15. Rfd1 Na5 16. Ba2 Nac4 17. d5 e5 18. Bxb6 Nxb6 19. a4 a5 20. Bb1 Rhg8
21. Bf5 Bxf5 22. Nxf5 Rg5 23. Nxe7+ Qxe7 24. Ne4 Rg6 25. d6 cxd6 26. Qc3+ Kb8
27. Qxa5 f5 28. Ng3 d5 29. Nxf5 Qg5 30. Ng3 h5 31. Qb5 h4 32. a5 hxg3 33. hxg3
Nc8 34. Rxd5 Rxd5 35. Qxd5 Rh6 36. Re1 Rh5 37. Qe6 Qg7 38. Rc1 Qh8 39. Rxc8+
Qxc8 40. Qd6+ Ka8 41. Qd2 Qh8 42. f3 Rh1+ 43. Kf2 Qc8 44. g4 Qc5+ 45. Kg3 Qd4
46. Qg5 Ka7 47. b4 Qc3 0-1

Black: GM Julio Catalino Sadorra (2554)

Rd 3

1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 Nf6 3. Bg2 e6 4. O-O c5 5. c4 Nc6 6. cxd5 exd5 7. d4 Be7 8.
dxc5 Bxc5 9. a3 O-O 10. b4 Bb6 11. Bb2 Ne4 12. Nc3 Nxc3 13. Bxc3 Bg4 14. e3 d4
15. exd4 Nxd4 16. Bxd4 Bxf3 17. Qxf3 Bxd4 18. Rad1 Qb6 19. Qxb7 Rad8 20. Qxb6
axb6 21. Rfe1 Bb2 22. a4 Bc3 23. Rxd8 Rxd8 24. Re4 g6 25. Bf1 Rd1 26. Kg2 Kg7
27. Rc4 Be1 28. Re4 Bc3 29. Bc4 Re1 30. Rxe1 Bxe1 31. b5 f5 32. f4 Kf6 33. Kf3
Bb4 34. h3 h5 35. g4 hxg4+ 36. hxg4 fxg4+ 37. Kxg4 Bd6 1/2-1/2

White: IM John Bartholomew (2442)

Rd 4

1. d4 d5 2. c4 dxc4 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. e3 e6 5. Bxc4 c5 6. O-O Nc6 7. a3 a6 8. dxc5
Qxd1 9. Rxd1 Bxc5 10. b4 Be7 11. Bb2 O-O 12. Nbd2 b5 13. Be2 Bb7 14. Nb3 Rfd8
15. Nfd2 Nd7 16. Bf3 Rab8 17. Rac1 Nde5 18. Bxe5 Nxe5 19. Bxb7 Rxb7 20. Ne4
Rxd1+ 21. Rxd1 Nc4 22. Nec5 Ra7 23. g3 g5 24. Rd7 Rxd7 25. Nxd7 Nxa3 26. Ndc5
Nc2 27. Nxa6 Bd6 28. Nd4 Nxd4 29. exd4 g4 30. f4 Kf8 31. Kf2 Ke7 32. Nc5 Kd8
33. Ke3 Kc7 34. Ke4 Kc6 35. Na6 f5+ 36. Kd3 Kd5 37. Nc5 h5 38. Ke3 Be7 39. Kd3
Bf6 40. Na6 Bd8 41. Ke3 Kd6 42. Nc5 Bf6 43. Na6 h4 44. Kd3 h3 45. Ke3 Kc6 46.
Nc5 Kd5 47. Kd3 Bh4 48. gxh4 0-1

Black: GM Ioan-Cristian Chirila (2557)

Rd 5

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nxc3 6. dxc3 Qxd1+ 7. Kxd1 f6
8. Be3 e5 9. Nd2 Be6 10. Bc4 Kf7 11. Kc2 Nd7 12. Rad1 Nb6 13. Bxe6+ Kxe6 14. b3
Nc8 15. f3 Nd6 16. c4 b6 17. Nb1 Nb7 18. Nc3 c6 19. g3 Bb4 20. Kb2 Rad8 21. a3
Bc5 22. Bxc5 Nxc5 23. b4 Nd3+ 24. Kc2 Nf2 25. Rxd8 Rxd8 26. Rf1 Nh3 27. Nd1 f5
28. exf5+ gxf5 29. Ne3 f4 30. gxf4 exf4 31. Ng4 h5 32. Nf2 Ng5 33. h4 Nxf3 34.
Nh3 Nd4+ 35. Kb2 f3 36. Ng5+ Kf5 37. Nxf3 Kg4 38. Ne5+ Kg3 39. Rg1+ Kh3 40.
Rh1+ Kg3 41. Rg1+ Kh3 42. Rh1+ Kg2 43. Rd1 Ne6 44. Re1 Nf4 45. Re4 Re8 46. Rxf4
Rxe5 47. Rf7 a5 48. Rf6 axb4 49. axb4 c5 50. Rxb6 cxb4 51. Rxb4 Re4 52. Kc3
Rxh4 53. Rb2+ Kg3 54. c5 Ra4 55. Rb3 h4 56. c6 Ra8 57. Kd4+ Kg2 58. Rb2+ Kg3
59. Rb3+ Kg2 60. Rb2+ 1/2-1/2

White: IM Atulya Shetty (2403)

Rd 6

1. c4 e5 2. g3 Nf6 3. Bg2 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. Nc3 Nb6 6. Nf3 Nc6 7. O-O Be7 8.
b3 O-O 9. Bb2 Re8 10. Rc1 Bg4 11. d3 Qd7 12. Ne4 f6 13. Nc5 Bxc5 14. Rxc5 Bh3
15. Bxh3 Qxh3 16. b4 a6 17. a4 Qe6 18. a5 Nd5 19. Ba3 b6 20. Rc1 Rad8 21. Qb3
Nd4 22. Nxd4 exd4 23. Bb2 bxa5 24. bxa5 Kh8 25. Bxd4 Qxe2 26. Qd1 Qe6 27. Re1
Qxe1+ 28. Qxe1 Rxe1+ 29. Rxe1 Kg8 30. Bc5 Rb8 31. Be3 Rb3 32. Rc1 Rxd3 33. Rc6
Nxe3 34. fxe3 Rd6 35. Rxc7 Rd5 36. Kg2 Rxa5 37. Ra7 h5 38. h4 Kh7 39. e4 Kg6
40. Kf3 Ra1 41. Kf2 a5 42. Kf3 a4 43. Kf2 a3 44. Kg2 a2 45. Kh2 Kh7 46. Ra8 g6
47. Ra7+ Kg8 48. Kg2 Kf8 49. Kh2 Ke8 50. Kg2 Kd8 51. Kh2 Kc8 52. Kg2 Kb8 53.
Ra3 Kb7 54. Ra4 Kb6 55. Ra8 Kb5 56. Rb8+ Kc4 57. Rc8+ Kd3 58. Rd8+ Ke3 59. Ra8
Rd1 60. Rxa2 Rd2+ 61. Rxd2 Kxd2 62. Kf2 Kd1 63. Kf1 1/2-1/2

Black: IM Steven Zierk (2493)

Rd 7

1. Nf3 c5 2. c4 Nf6 3. Nc3 Nc6 4. g3 g6 5. Bg2 Bg7 6. d4 cxd4 7. Nxd4 O-O 8.
O-O Nxd4 9. Qxd4 d6 10. Qd3 Rb8 11. Bg5 Be6 12. Rac1 a6 13. b3 Re8 14. Rfd1 Qa5
15. Bd2 Qh5 16. a4 Nd7 17. Nd5 Ne5 18. Qe4 Bf5 19. Nf4 Bxe4 20. Nxh5 Bxg2 21.
Nxg7 Kxg7 22. Kxg2 Nd7 23. Be3 Rbc8 24. Rd5 Rc6 25. Rcd1 Rec8 26. f4 f5 27. Kf3
Kf7 28. a5 Nf6 29. R5d3 Ne4 30. Bb6 Nf6 31. h3 Nd7 32. Be3 Nc5 33. Bxc5 Rxc5
34. Rd5 R8c6 35. e4 Rxd5 36. Rxd5 e6 37. Rd4 Ke7 38. g4 fxe4+ 39. Kxe4 b6 40.
axb6 Rxb6 41. Rd3 Rb8 42. f5 Rf8 43. Rf3 gxf5+ 44. gxf5 Rg8 45. fxe6 Kxe6 46.
Kd4 a5 47. Re3+ Kd7 48. Kc3 Rg2 49. Rd3 Kc6 50. Rd5 Rg3+ 51. Kb2 a4 52. bxa4
Rxh3 53. a5 Re3 54. Rh5 Re5 55. Rxh7 Rxa5 56. Kc3 1/2-1/2

White: IM John M Burke (2502)

Rd 8

1. e4 c6 2. Nc3 d5 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. e5 Ne4 5. Ne2 Qb6 6. d4 e6 7. Ng3 c5 8. Bd3
Nxg3 9. fxg3 c4 10. Be2 Be7 11. O-O Nc6 12. g4 Bd7 13. c3 f6 14. exf6 gxf6 15.
g5 O-O-O 16. gxf6 Bxf6 17. Kh1 Rhg8 18. b3 cxb3 19. axb3 e5 20. dxe5 Nxe5 21.
Nxe5 Bxe5 22. Qxd5 Qg6 23. Bf3 Bc6 24. Qc4 Rdf8 25. Bxc6 Qxc6 26. Qxc6+ bxc6
27. Be3 Bxc3 28. Rxf8+ Rxf8 29. Rc1 Bb2 30. Rb1 Re8 31. Bxa7 Re2 32. g3 Kb7 33.
Bg1 Kc7 34. Rf1 Kd6 35. Rf7 h6 36. Bf2 Bc1 37. Kg2 Rb2 38. Rf3 Ke5 39. h4 Ke4
40. g4 Bf4 41. Rh3 Be5 42. g5 hxg5 43. hxg5 Kf5 44. Rd3 1/2-1/2

Black: GM Jayaram Ashwin (2474)

Rd 9

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. g3 d5 3. Bg2 c6 4. O-O Bg4 5. h3 Bh5 6. c4 e6 7. d4 Be7 8. cxd5 cxd5 9. Qb3 Qb6 10. Qxb6 axb6 11. Nc3 Nc6 12. Be3 Nd7 13. Nb5 O-O 14. Rfc1 Rfc8 15. a3 Na5 16. Rxc8+ Rxc8 17. Rc1 Rc6 18. Rc3 Kf8 19. g4 Bg6 20. Nd2 Bc2 21. b4 Rxc3 22. Nxc3 Nc6 23. f4 Nf6 24. Kf2 Ne8 25. Nf3 Nd6 26. Bc1 Ne4+ 27. Nxe4 dxe4 28. Ne5 Nxd4 29. Ke3 Nb3 30. Bb2 f5 31. g5 b5 32. Bc3 Bd6 33. Bf1 Bxe5 34. Bxe5 g6 35. Bb2 Ke7 36. h4 Kd6 37. Bh3 Kd5 38. Bg2 Bb1 39. Bh3 Kc4 40. Bf1 Bc2 41. Bg2 b6 42. Bf1 Bb1 43. Bg2 Ba2 44. Bf1 Kd5 45. Bg2 Kc6 46. Bh3 Kd6 47. Bg2 Kd5 48. Bh3 Bb1 49. Bg2 Kc4 50. Bf1 Ba2 51. Bg2 Bb1 52. Bf1 Bc2 53. Bg2 Bb1 ½-½

IM Daniel Gurevich vs. IM Aman Hambleton [Round 1]

https://www.twitch.tv/videos/202166652

IM Bartholomew vs. IM Daniel Gurevich [Round 2]

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The Dragon vs The Magician

The TCEC Season 10 – Superfinal between defending Champion Komodo and challenger Houdini has begun! As I write game five has just ended and game six began immediately. Games are played 24/7 until all ONE HUNDRED games are finished. I wonder what La Bourdonnais and McDonnell, who played a series of six matches, a total of eighty-five games, between June and October 1834, would have to say about the Superfinal?

Before calling it an evening about ten o’clock last night it looked as though the Dragon would score first with the Black pieces in a MacCutcheon variation of the French defense. TCEC narrows it down further to, “Lasker, 7.bxc3.” Imagine my surprise to learn this morning that it was not the Dragon taking the lead, but the escape artist known as Houdini the Magician! Houdini managed to draw the game, with much help from Komodo, and then draw first blood by beating the Dragon’s “Sicilian: Taimanov, 6.Be3 a6 7.Qd2.”

I have been following the TCEC computer program championships for years. I still enjoy watching the games played by humans, but let’s face it, if it were Baseball the only way to describe it would be akin to watching minor league baseball as opposed to Major League Baseball. The difference in the lay is so great now that humans could be described as playing at least two levels lower than computer programs, something along the line of the difference between MLB and class AA baseball, maybe even class A. Do not get me wrong, I have watched, and enjoyed, many a minor league baseball game, and, for that matter, many college baseball games, in many different cities, but if I want to watch the best baseball being played, I must go to a MLB game. That is one reason I have found it so humorous that the F.I.P.s at FIDE have decided to try and bilk the small Chess public out of all they can by charging to watch the games played during real time. Back in my day we waited until the next day for the games of the World Championship to appear in a newspaper, and WE LIKED IT! Now the fools in power charge for what one can obtain just a few hours later on the internet after the completion of the games. As far as Chess moves go this one is what GM Yasser Seriwan would call a “Howler.” The only thing FIDE has done is hurt people like Mark Crowther, who has put out The Week In Chess for decades. (http://theweekinchess.com/) I mention TWIC because Mark shows only a Chess board and the moves, without any kind of analysis whatsoever, for those of us who prefer to actually THINK about what move may come next. These FIDE people are so stupid they do not even realize they are damaging the game because the GAMES are PUBLICITY, which bring more PEOPLE into CHESS. If it were not so serious I would LAUGH. As it is, it makes one want to CRY. What FIDE is doing is reminiscent of greedy MLB owners refusing to allow radio, and then television, broadcasts thinking it would cut down on attendance, until one owner thought it could possibly be good for the game by bringing the game to the fans, thereby engendering more fans.

The Superfinal is the third stage of the Championships. I was transfixed by the first stage this season, the tenth, as what many would call “offbeat” openings were used. This was right up my alley! When playing over the board I built an opening repertoire (http://www.mark-weeks.com/aboutcom/aa02i07.htm) consisting of hand written openings kept in what one legendary player called “Bacon’s book of death lines!” Before lost in what I now call the “Crazy Cousin Linda Flood,” the BODL was intact except for the cover, which had been lost somewhere on the Chess road who knows when. Now whole books are written devoted to what were my “death lines,” such as, The Extreme Caro-Kann: Attacking Black with 3.f3, by Alexey Bezgodov. I hope to live long enough to see a book on 2 Qe2 versus the French.

The expected media follows after a data dump. Here are the games I copied from the first stage, hoping to find time to look at each and every one of them. This should give those of you asking “Who are you?” insight to my Chess character.

TCEC Season 10 Stage 1 games

Chiron 040917 (3004)
Stockfish 041017 (3227)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
1
2017.10.14
A84
Dutch: 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3

1. c4 e6 2. Nf3 f5 3. d4 Bb4+ 4. Bd2 Bxd2+ 5. Nbxd2 Nf6 6. e3 O-O 7. Bd3 d6 8. Qc2 c5 9. O-O g6 10. a3 Nc6 11. b4 b6 12. b5 Na5 13. Rfe1 Nd7 14. e4 Qf6 15. d5 e5 16. h3 f4 17. Nh2 Qe7 18. Qd1 Kg7 19. Ng4 h5 20. Nh2 Nf6 21. Ndf3 Nh7 22. Nd2 Kh6 23. Be2 Bd7 24. Rc1 Rf7 25. Kh1 Nf6 26. h4 g5 27. hxg5+ Kxg5 28. Rg1 Rg8 29. g3 Kh6 30. Qe1 Rfg7 31. Rc3 Kh7 32. Rg2 h4 33. g4 Kh8 34. Rh3 Rh7 35. Qd1 Rh6 36. Kg1 Nb7 37. Nhf1 Rh7 38. f3 Nh5 39. Bd3 Nd8 40. Rgh2 Ng3 41. Qa4 Nf7 42. Qxa7 Qd8 43. Qa4 Rg6 44. Qc2 Kg8 45. a4 Rgh6 46. Be2 Ng5 47. Bd1 Qa8 48. Nb1 Nxh3+ 49. Rxh3 Nh5 50. Kf2 Nf6 51. Ke1 Rh8 52. Nfd2 Kf7 53. Nc3 Qa5 54. Kf1 Rg8 55. Ndb1 Rhh8 56. Na2 Nh7 57. Nd2 Ng5 58. Rh2 h3 59. Qd3 Nxf3 60. Bxf3 Bxg4 61. Nc3 Bd7 62. Qc2 Rg3 63. Ne2 Rg7 64. Rh1 h2 65. Bg2 Qa8 66. Nf3 Qg8 67. Nxf4 exf4 68. e5 Ke7 69. Rxh2 Rxh2 70. Nxh2 Qh8 71. exd6+ Kxd6 72. Qc3 Rg8 73. Qxh8 Rxh8 74. Nf3 Ra8 75. a5 0-1

Hannibal 121017 (3012)
Fruit 3.2 (2606)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
1
2017.10.14
A00
Polish: 1…Nf6 2.Bb2 e6

1. b4 Nf6 2. Bb2 e6 3. a3 a5 4. b5 d5 5. c4 Nbd7 6. e3 Bd6 7. Nf3 O-O 8. cxd5 exd5 9. Qc2 Rb8 10. Bd4 c5 11. bxc6 Qc7 12. Nc3 bxc6 13. Be2 c5 14. Bxf6 Nxf6 15. Nb5 Qb6 16. O-O Bd7 17. Nxd6 Qxd6 18. Rfb1 c4 19. Rxb8 Rxb8 20. d3 cxd3 21. Bxd3 a4 22. Nd4 Rc8 23. Qb2 Ng4 24. Nf3 Qf6 25. Qxf6 Nxf6 26. Ne5 Be8 27. Kf1 Rc3 28. Be2 Kf8 29. Nf3 Bd7 30. Ne5 Ke7 31. Ke1 Ke6 32. Nf3 g6 33. Nd4+ Ke5 34. Bd1 Ne4 35. Ne2 Rc8 36. Rb1 Rc4 37. Rb6 Rc6 38. Rb4 Rc4 39. Rxc4 dxc4 40. f3 Nc5 41. Kd2 Kd6 42. Bc2 Nb3+ 43. Kc3 Kc5 44. g4 h6 45. Ng3 Bc6 46. Be4 Bd5 47. h4 Be6 48. h5 gxh5 49. Nxh5 Nc1 50. Kd2 Nb3+ 51. Kc2 Bc8 52. Kc3 Nc1 53. Ng3 Bd7 54. Bc2 Kd5 55. Ne4 Bb5 56. f4 Bc6 57. Nf6+ Kc5 58. Ng8 Ne2+ 59. Kd2 Bf3 60. Nxh6 Ng3 61. Nf5 Nf1+ 62. Ke1 Nh2 63. g5 c3 64. Bxa4 Be4 65. Ng3 Bd5 66. Kd1 Ng4 67. Ke2 Kc4 68. Bc2 Kc5 69. Bd3 Kc6 70. Ne4 c2 71. Bxc2 Be6 72. Bd3 Kb6 73. Ng3 Nh2 74. Nf5 Kc5 75. Kf2 Bd5 76. Nh6 Kd6 77. e4 Bb3 1-0

Komodo 1937.00 (3230)
Wasp 2.5 (2824)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
2
2017.10.15
C25
Vienna: 2…Bc5 3.Nf3

1. e4 e5 2. Nc3 Bc5 3. Nf3 d6 4. Na4 Nf6 5. Nxc5 dxc5 6. d3 Nc6 7. Be2 a5 8. h3 a4 9. O-O O-O 10. c3 Qe7 11. Bd2 Rd8 12. Qc2 Nh5 13. Rfd1 h6 14. Be3 Nf4 15. Bxf4 exf4 16. Rd2 Ne5 17. d4 Nxf3+ 18. Bxf3 Be6 19. Kh2 g6 20. Qd3 Kg7 21. Qe2 f6 22. e5 cxd4 23. Rxd4 Rxd4 24. cxd4 c6 25. Qd2 f5 26. d5 cxd5 27. Qxf4 Qc5 28. Rc1 Qb6 29. h4 d4 30. Be2 Rc8 31. Rxc8 Bxc8 32. Bc4 Qc5 33. Bd3 h5 34. Qg3 Kf7 35. f4 Be6 36. Qg5 Qe7 37. Qxe7+ Kxe7 38. a3 Bd5 39. Kg3 Bc6 40. Kf2 b5 41. Be2 Kd7 42. Ke1 Kc7 43. Kd2 Kb6 44. e6 Bxg2 45. e7 Bc6 46. Kd3 Kc5 47. Bf3 Be8 48. Bd1 Kd6 49. Kxd4 Kxe7 50. Kd5 Kf6 51. Kd6 Bf7 52. Bf3 Bc4 53. Bc6 Kf7 54. Kc5 Ke7 55. Bxb5 Bxb5 56. Kxb5 g5 57. fxg5 f4 58. Kc4 Ke6 59. Kd3 Ke5 60. g6 Kf6 61. Ke4 Kxg6 62. Kxf4 Kf6 63. Ke4 Ke6 1-0

Houdini 6.02 (3184)
Laser 200917 (2660)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
2
2017.10.16
B10
Caro-Kann: English Variation

1. c4 c6 2. e4 d6 3. d4 Nd7 4. Be2 e5 5. Nf3 h6 6. Nc3 Ngf6 7. O-O Be7 8. Be3 Ng4 9. Bd2 g6 10. Qc2 Bf6 11. d5 Be7 12. Rad1 Ngf6 13. Be3 c5 14. Ne1 g5 15. a3 Nf8 16. b4 b6 17. g3 Bh3 18. Ng2 Ng6 19. Bd2 Qd7 20. Rfe1 Bd8 21. Ne3 Ne7 22. f3 a6 23. Kh1 Rg8 24. Rg1 h5 25. Rb1 Rh8 26. bxc5 bxc5 27. Ncd1 Ng6 28. Nf2 g4 29. Nf5 Ne7 30. Rb7 Bc7 31. Bg5 Nxf5 32. exf5 Nh7 33. Bh4 gxf3 34. Nxh3 fxe2 35. Qxe2 Qc8 36. Rgb1 Nf8 37. Ng5 Rb8 38. Rxb8 Bxb8 39. Ne4 Nd7 40. Qd2 Bc7 41. Qg5 Kf8 42. Qe7+ Kg7 43. g4 Qd8 44. f6+ Kg8 45. Nxd6 Qxe7 46. fxe7 Kh7 1-0

Fruit 3.2 (2606)
Ginkgo 2 (3042)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
2
2017.10.16
A89
Dutch: Leningrad, Main Line, 7.Nc3 Nc6

1. g3 f5 2. Bg2 Nf6 3. d4 g6 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. O-O O-O 6. c4 d6 7. Nc3 Nc6 8. Qc2 e5 9. dxe5 dxe5 10. Be3 e4 11. Rad1 Qe8 12. Ng5 h6 13. Nh3 g5 14. Kh1 Qh5 15. Nd5 f4 16. Ndxf4 gxf4 17. Nxf4 Qf7 18. h3 Re8 19. g4 Ne5 20. b3 Bd7 21. Kg1 Bc6 22. Rd4 b6 23. Rdd1 a5 24. Rd2 a4 25. Nd5 axb3 26. axb3 Ra5 27. Nxf6+ Qxf6 28. Rc1 Qh4 29. Rcd1 Ng6 30. Rd5 Bxd5 31. cxd5 Qe7 32. Qc4 Kh7 33. Rc1 Qe5 34. Qxc7 Qxd5 35. Qxb6 Rb5 36. Qa6 Re7 37. Qa4 Rxb3 38. Bc5 Re6 39. Be3 Rxe3 40. fxe3 Qd2 41. Rc7 Qxe3+ 42. Kh1 Qxe2 43. Qa1 Ne7 44. Qb1 Nd5 45. Rf7 Ne3 46. Bf3 Qc2 47. Qxc2 Nxc2 48. Bd1 Nd4 49. Kg2 0-1

Chiron 040917 (3004)
Nirvana 2.4 (3034)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
3
2017.10.16
B01
Scandinavian: 2…Qxd5 3.Nf3 Nf6

1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Nf6 3. Nf3 Qxd5 4. Nc3 Qd8 5. d4 e6 6. Bc4 a6 7. a4 Be7 8. O-O Nc6 9. Re1 O-O 10. Bf4 Nd5 11. Bg3 Bb4 12. Qd3 Ba5 13. Red1 Ncb4 14. Qd2 Nc6 15. Bb3 Nce7 16. Qd3 Nf5 17. Ne4 c6 18. c3 Nxg3 19. hxg3 Bc7 20. Re1 a5 21. Rad1 f6 22. Nc5 Re8 23. Qd2 b6 24. Nd3 Bd6 25. g4 Be7 26. Qe2 Bf8 27. g5 fxg5 28. Qe4 Bb7 29. Nde5 Bd6 30. c4 Nf6 31. Qd3 Bxe5 32. dxe5 Qxd3 33. Rxd3 Nh5 34. Nxg5 Nf4 35. Rd7 Rab8 36. g3 h6 37. gxf4 hxg5 38. fxg5 c5 39. g6 Rf8 40. Bc2 Bf3 41. Bd1 Rf4 42. Bxf3 Rxf3 43. Re7 Rf4 44. Rxe6 Rxc4 45. Rc6 Rxa4 46. Kh2 Rg4 47. Kh3 Rd4 48. e6 Kf8 49. Rc7 Rd6 50. f4 b5 51. f5 Rbd8 52. f6 Rd3+ 1-0

Rybka 4.1 (3102)
Fruit 3.2 (2606)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
3
2017.10.16
B01
Scandinavian: Scandinavian Gambit

1. e4 c6 2. c4 d5 3. exd5 Nf6 4. Qa4 Qd7 5. Nc3 cxd5 6. Qxd7+ Nbxd7 7. d3 dxc4 8. dxc4 e5 9. Nf3 b6 10. Be2 Bb4 11. Bd2 Bb7 12. O-O O-O 13. Rad1 Rfd8 14. a3 Bc5 15. Bg5 h6 16. Bxf6 Nxf6 17. Rxd8+ Rxd8 18. Nxe5 Re8 19. Nf3 Ne4 20. Nxe4 Bxe4 21. Rd1 Be7 22. Kf1 Bf6 23. Rd2 Bf5 24. h3 h5 25. Bd1 Be6 26. b3 Bc8 27. Ne1 g6 28. Bf3 Bf5 29. g4 hxg4 30. hxg4 Bc8 31. Nc2 Kg7 32. Ne3 Be7 33. b4 Bg5 34. Rd3 Ba6 35. Rc3 Rc8 36. Bd5 Rd8 37. Ke2 Bc8 38. Kf3 Bf6 39. Rc1 Bb2 40. Rb1 Bf6 41. Rd1 Be7 42. Rc1 Bf6 43. c5 Bb2 44. cxb6 Bxc1 45. bxa7 Bd7 46. Nc4 Ba4 47. a8=Q Rxa8 48. Bxa8 Bb3 49. Ne3 Ba4 50. Nd5 Bxa3 51. Ke4 Bb2 52. f3 Kh6 53. Kf4 Bc1+ 54. Ke5 Bb2+ 55. Kd6 Bd4 56. Bc6 Bd1 57. Nc7 Kg5 58. Ke7 Be5 59. Kd7 Bd4 60. b5 Kf4 61. Ke8 Bb3 62. Ke7 Bc5+ 63. Kd7 Bd4 64. Be4 f5 65. gxf5 gxf5 66. Bc6 Ke5 67. Ba8 Bc4 68. Bb7 Be3 69. Bc6 Bc5 70. Na8 Be6+ 1/2-1/2

Gull 3 (3112)
Komodo 1937.00 (3230)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
3
2017.10.17
B90
Sicilian: Najdorf

1. e4 d6 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nc3 c5 4. d4 cxd4 5. Nxd4 a6 6. Qd3 Nbd7 7. Be2 e6 8. a4 b6 9. Nb3 Qc7 10. Bf4 Ne5 11. Qd4 Bb7 12. O-O Be7 13. Qe3 O-O 14. Bg3 h6 15. Rad1 Rac8 16. h3 Rfd8 17. Rd4 Nfd7 18. Rfd1 Nc5 19. Kh1 Ng6 20. Bh5 Bg5 21. Qe1 Nf4 22. Bf3 h5 23. Bh2 Qe7 24. h4 Bh6 25. g3 Nxb3 26. cxb3 e5 27. Rb4 d5 28. Nxd5 Nxd5 29. exd5 Rd6 30. Rc4 Rcd8 31. Kg1 f5 32. Qc3 Bxd5 33. Bxd5+ Rxd5 34. Rxd5 Rxd5 35. Kg2 e4 36. Rd4 Rxd4 37. Qxd4 Qb7 38. Bg1 g6 39. b4 b5 40. a5 Kh7 41. Qb6 Qc8 42. Qc5 Qd7 43. f4 exf3+ 44. Kxf3 f4 45. gxf4 Qg4+ 46. Ke4 Qxf4+ 47. Kd5 Qf3+ 48. Ke6 Qh3+ 49. Kd5 Qh1+ 50. Ke6 Qxh4 51. Kd7 Qe4 52. Kc7 Bf4+ 53. Kb6 Qe6+ 54. Ka7 h4 55. Qb6 Qxb6+ 56. Kxb6 h3 57. Kxa6 g5 58. Kxb5 h2 59. Bxh2 Bxh2 60. Kc4 0-1

Bobcat 8 (2891)
Nemorino 3.04 (2899)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
3
2017.10.17
A03
Bird: 1…d5 2.Nf3 g6 3.e3

1. f4 d5 2. Nf3 g6 3. e3 c5 4. d4 cxd4 5. exd4 e6 6. Bd3 Bd6 7. O-O Ne7 8. Be3 O-O 9. Nbd2 Nf5 10. Bxf5 exf5 11. c4 b6 12. Rc1 Re8 13. Ne5 Bb7 14. Qb3 Bf8 15. c5 Nc6 16. Rfe1 Nxe5 17. fxe5 Re6 18. Nf3 a5 19. Rc3 bxc5 20. dxc5 Rb8 21. Qc2 Rc8 22. Bf2 Qe8 23. Qd2 Rec6 24. Rec1 Qd7 25. b3 R6c7 26. a3 Ba6 27. h3 Qb5 28. Nd4 Qd7 29. c6 Qe7 30. Rc5 a4 31. b4 Bc4 32. Ra5 Qe8 33. Bg3 Rxc6 34. Nxc6 Rxc6 35. Rxa4 Qb8 36. Bf2 Bg7 37. Bd4 Re6 38. Qc3 Bh6 39. Rb1 Bb5 40. Ra5 Rc6 41. Qg3 Re6 42. a4 Bc4 43. b5 Rb6 44. Qc3 Rb7 45. b6 Bg5 46. Rc5 Re7 47. a5 Qb7 48. Qg3 Bd2 49. e6 f4 50. Qh4 Be3+ 51. Bxe3 fxe3 1-0

Nirvana 2.4 (3034)
Arasan 20.2 (2741)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
4
2017.10.17
A03
Bird: Lasker, 3…c5

1. f4 d5 2. e3 Nf6 3. Nf3 c5 4. Bb5+ Nbd7 5. Be2 e6 6. O-O a6 7. c4 Bd6 8. d3 Qc7 9. Nc3 O-O 10. g3 Rd8 11. cxd5 Nxd5 12. Ne4 Be7 13. Nf2 b5 14. e4 Nb4 15. Be3 Nc6 16. b3 e5 17. Rc1 exf4 18. gxf4 Qb6 19. Kh1 Bb7 20. Rg1 Rac8 21. f5 Kh8 22. Ng4 Nd4 23. b4 Nxf3 24. Bxf3 h5 25. Nf2 Ne5 26. Qe2 h4 27. Rg2 a5 28. Rcg1 Bf6 29. Ng4 h3 30. Rg3 Nxg4 31. bxc5 Rxc5 32. Rxg4 Rdc8 33. Qf1 Kg8 34. Qxh3 Kf8 35. Qh7 Qd6 36. Rxg7 Bxg7 37. Qxg7+ Ke7 38. Qh7 Rf8 39. Bh6 Rcc8 40. f6+ Kd7 41. Bxf8 Rxf8 42. Qf5+ Kd8 43. Qxb5 Rh8 44. Bh5 Kc8 45. Rc1+ Kb8 46. Rb1 Qc7 47. Qxb7+ Qxb7 48. Rxb7+ Kxb7 49. Bxf7 Rf8 50. Bd5+ Kb8 1-0

Komodo 1937.00 (3230)
Bobcat 8 (2891)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
4
2017.10.17
B13
Caro-Kann: Panov-Botvinnik, 5…Nc6 6.Nf3

1. e4 c6 2. c4 d5 3. exd5 Nf6 4. d4 cxd5 5. Nc3 Nc6 6. Nf3 g6 7. cxd5 Nxd5 8. Qb3 Nxc3 9. Bc4 e6 10. bxc3 Bg7 11. Ba3 Na5 12. Bb5+ Bd7 13. Qb2 b6 14. Be2 f6 15. O-O Kf7 16. Bb4 Nc6 17. a3 Re8 18. c4 Kg8 19. Rad1 Qc7 20. Rfe1 Nd8 21. Rc1 Nf7 22. h4 Rab8 23. Qc2 Bc6 24. d5 Bb7 25. Qb3 Bh6 26. Rcd1 a5 27. Bc3 e5 28. Rb1 Ba6 29. h5 Bg7 30. Bd2 Nd6 31. Rec1 Nf5 32. Bf1 e4 33. c5 Bxf1 34. d6+ Qf7 35. d7 Red8 36. c6 Ra8 37. Ne5 Qxb3 38. Rxb3 Be2 39. hxg6 fxe5 40. Bg5 Nd4 41. Bxd8 Bg4 42. Rxb6 Nxc6 43. Rcxc6 Bxd7 44. gxh7+ Kxh7 45. Rc7 Rxd8 46. Rd6 e3 47. fxe3 Bf8 48. Rcxd7+ Rxd7 49. Rxd7+ Kg6 50. Ra7 Bxa3 1-0

Hakkapeliitta 210416 (2778)
Laser 200917 (2660)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
4
2017.10.18
A01
Nimzowitsch-Larsen: 1…d5

1. b3 d5 2. e3 Nf6 3. Nf3 Bf5 4. Be2 c5 5. O-O h5 6. d4 cxd4 7. Nxd4 Bc8 8. c4 e6 9. cxd5 exd5 10. Bb2 Nc6 11. Nc3 a6 12. Rc1 Bd6 13. h3 Rh6 14. Bf3 Be5 15. Na4 Qc7 16. Nxc6 Bxb2 17. Nxb2 bxc6 18. Bxd5 Nxd5 19. Qxd5 cxd5 20. Rxc7 Bf5 21. Rd1 Rd8 22. Nd3 Bxd3 23. Rxd3 Rhd6 24. Rd4 R8d7 25. Rc8+ Rd8 26. Rc5 g6 27. h4 Ke7 28. Kf1 Ke6 29. Ke2 Rb8 30. Kd3 Rb5 31. Rc7 Rd7 32. Rxd7 Kxd7 33. e4 Kc6 34. Rxd5 Rb4 35. f4 Rb6 36. Kc4 Kc7 37. e5 Rb7 38. a4 Kb8 39. a5 Kc8 40. Rd6 Rc7+ 41. Kd5 Ra7 42. Kc5 Kc7 43. Rf6 Kd8 44. Kb6 Re7 45. Kxa6 Kc7 46. Kb5 Kb7 1-0

Gaviota 1.01 (2757)
Rybka 4.1 (3102)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
4
2017.10.18
A80
Dutch: 2.Bg5 h6

1. d4 f5 2. Bg5 h6 3. Bf4 Nf6 4. h4 c5 5. e3 cxd4 6. exd4 Nc6 7. Nf3 e6 8. a3 d5 9. Bb5 Bd7 10. Bxc6 Bxc6 11. Ne5 Bd6 12. Ng6 Bxf4 13. Nxh8 Qb6 14. Nc3 Qxb2 15. Rh3 Bc7 16. Kf1 Rc8 17. Kg1 Ng4 18. a4 Qb4 19. Rb1 Qc4 20. Ng6 Kf7 21. h5 Nf6 22. a5 Ne4 23. Ne2 Bb5 24. Re3 Ba6 25. c3 Qc6 26. Ra1 Bxe2 27. Qxe2 Re8 28. Qc2 Nf6 29. Qd1 Ne4 30. Qa4 Qxa4 31. Rxa4 Kf6 32. f4 Rc8 33. c4 dxc4 34. Rxc4 Bxf4 35. Rxe4 Rxc4 36. Rxf4 Ra4 37. Rf3 Rxa5 38. Rb3 b6 39. Nf4 e5 40. dxe5+ Kxe5 41. g3 Ra2 42. Kf1 Rh2 43. Ra3 a5 44. Rb3 Ke4 45. Rxb6 a4 46. Rc6 Ra2 47. Rc3 Kd4 48. Rf3 Ke4 49. Rc3 Kd4 50. Rf3 Ke4 51. Rd3 a3 52. Rb3 Ra1+ 53. Ke2 Ra2+ 54. Kd1 Ra1+ 55. Ke2 Ra2+ 56. Kd1 Ra1+ 57. Kd2 Ra2+ 58. Kc1 Ra1+ 59. Kd2 Ra2+ 60. Kc1 Ra1+ 61. Kc2 a2 62. Kb2 Rb1+ 63. Kxa2 Rxb3 64. Kxb3 Kf3 65. Ne6 Kxg3 66. Nxg7 f4 67. Nf5+ Kg4 68. Nxh6+ 1/2-1/2

Hannibal 121017 (3012)
Chiron 040917 (3004)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
5
2017.10.18
C25
Vienna: 2…d6 3.Bc4

1. Nc3 d6 2. e4 e5 3. Bc4 Be7 4. Qh5 g6 5. Qd1 Nf6 6. Nf3 Nc6 7. d4 Bg4 8. dxe5 dxe5 9. Bh6 Qxd1+ 10. Rxd1 Bxf3 11. gxf3 Nd4 12. Nb5 Nxb5 13. Bxb5+ c6 14. Bf1 Rd8 15. Rxd8+ Bxd8 16. Bh3 Ke7 17. Ke2 Bb6 18. Rd1 Rd8 19. Rxd8 Bxd8 20. Bc8 b6 21. Bg5 Ke8 22. Bh6 Nh5 23. Be3 Nf4+ 24. Bxf4 exf4 25. c3 b5 26. Ba6 Kd7 27. Kd3 Bb6 28. Ke2 Bc5 29. Ke1 g5 30. Kf1 h5 31. Ke2 Bd6 32. h3 h4 33. Kd2 f6 34. a3 Bc5 35. Ke2 Kd6 36. b4 Bb6 37. Ke1 Bc7 38. Kd1 Kd7 39. Ke1 Be5 40. Kd2 Bd6 41. Kd1 Kd8 42. Kc1 Kc7 43. Kc2 Be7 44. Kb3 Bd8 45. Kc2 Kd6 46. Kd2 Kd7 47. Ke1 Bc7 48. Ke2 Bb6 49. Ke1 Kd6 50. Ke2 Ke7 51. Bb7 Kd7 52. Ba6 Kd8 53. Ke1 Kc7 54. Kf1 Kb8 55. Ke1 Bc7 56. Ke2 Be5 57. Kd3 Kc7 58. Kc2 Kb6 59. Bc8 Bc7 60. Kd3 a6 61. Be6 Be5 62. Bf5 Bb8 63. Kc2 Ba7 64. Kd1 Kc7 65. Ke1 Bb6 66. Bg6 Kd7 67. Bf5+ Kd8 68. Ke2 a5 69. Ke1 c5 70. e5 fxe5 71. Bd3 c4 72. Bb1 a4 73. Bc2 Kc7 74. Be4 Kd6 75. Bb1 Bd8 76. Be4 Bc7 77. Bb1 Bb6 78. Bc2 Ba7 79. Be4 Bb8 80. Bb1 Kc7 81. Kd2 Ba7 82. Ke1 Kb6 83. Bc2 Ka6 84. Ke2 Bb8 85. Bb1 Ka7 86. Bc2 Bd6 87. Bb1 Kb6 88. Bc2 Bb8 89. Be4 Ba7 90. Kd2 Kc7 91. Ke2 Bb8 92. Bb1 Kc6 93. Bc2 Bd6 94. Bb1 Bc7 95. Bc2 Bd8 96. Bb1 Kd6 97. Be4 Be7 98. Bc2 Bf6 99. Kd2 Bg7 100. Bb1 Bf8 101. Bc2 Kc7 102. Bb1 Be7 103. Bc2 Bd6 104. Bb1 Bf8 105. Be4 Bg7 106. Bb1 Bf6 107. Bc2 Be7 108. Bb1 Bd8 109. Bc2 Kb6 110. Bb1 Be7 111. Be4 Bd6 112. Bb1 Bc7 113. Bc2 Bb8 114. Bb1 Bd6 115. Bc2 Bf8 116. Bb1 Ka6 117. Ba2 e4 118. Bb1 exf3 119. Bf5 Ka7 120. Bg4 Bd6 121. Bf5 Be5 122. Bg4 Bc7 123. Bh5 Bb6 124. Ke1 Ka6 125. Bg4 Bd8 126. Bf5 Kb6 127. Kd2 Be7 128. Bg4 Bd6 129. Bf5 Be5 130. Bg4 Bf6 131. Bf5 Bg7 132. Kc2 Bf8 133. Bg4 Bd6 134. Kd2 Bb8 135. Bf5 Bc7 136. Bg4 Kc6 137. Bh5 Bb6 138. Ke1 Kd6 139. Bxf3 Bd8 140. Ke2 Bf6 141. Kd2 Be5 142. Be2 Bg7 143. Bf3 Bf6 144. Bd1 Kc6 145. Bg4 Kb6 146. Kc2 Be5 147. Kd2 Bd6 148. f3 Kc6 149. Bf5 Be5 150. Kc2 Bf6 151. Kd2 Be7 152. Be4+ Kb6 153. Bd5 Kc7 154. Be4 Bd6 155. Bf5 Bf8 156. Bg4 Bg7 157. Bf5 Kb7 158. Bb1 Kb6 159. Bf5 Bf8 160. Bb1 Be7 161. Bf5 Bd8 162. Bg4 Bf6 163. Kc2 Be5 164. Bf5 Bh8 165. Be4 Bf6 166. Bf5 Bd8 167. Be4 Bc7 168. Bd5 Be5 169. Be6 Bd6 170. Kb2 Bb8 171. Bg4 Be5 172. Kc2 Kc7 173. Bf5 Kd6 174. Kd2 Bf6 175. Kc2 Bg7 176. Bg4 Be5 177. Bf5 Bh8 178. Bg4 Kc6 179. Bf5 Be5 180. Be4+ Kd7 181. Bf5+ Kc7 182. Be6 Bg7 183. Bg4 Bf6 184. Bf5 Be7 185. Bg4 Bd6 186. Bf5 Bf8 187. Be4 Bh6 188. Bf5 Kb6 189. Be4 Bg7 190. Bf5 Bf8 191. Be4 Be7 192. Bd5 Kc7 193. Be6 Bf6 194. Bf5 Bh8 195. Be4 Bg7 196. Bf5 g4 197. Bxg4 Be5 198. Kd2 Kb6 199. Bf5 Bf6 200. Bb1 Kc7 201. Ba2 Kd6 202. Bb1 1/2-1/2

Fire 6.1 (3113)
Gaviota 1.01 (2757)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
5
2017.10.18
C00
French: Chigorin Variation

1. e4 e6 2. Qe2 d5 3. exd5 Nf6 4. dxe6 Bxe6 5. Nf3 Be7 6. g3 O-O 7. Bg2 Re8 8. O-O c5 9. b3 Nc6 10. Bb2 Bg4 11. h3 Bf5 12. d3 Qd7 13. Kh2 c4 14. bxc4 Ba3 15. Qxe8+ Rxe8 16. Nxa3 a6 17. Nh4 h6 18. Rab1 Bh7 19. Bc3 Qc7 20. Kg1 b6 21. Nf3 Bf5 22. Rfd1 Re2 23. Bf1 Re6 24. Rb3 Qd6 25. Nb1 Nd7 26. Bg2 Re2 27. Nbd2 Bh7 28. Rc1 Bg6 29. Bf1 Re8 30. d4 Bh7 31. h4 Bf5 32. Bd3 Qg6 33. d5 Na7 34. Bd4 Nc8 35. Kg2 Qg4 36. Rh1 h5 37. Rbb1 Re7 38. Rhe1 Rxe1 39. Rxe1 Nd6 40. Be3 Nc8 41. Nb3 Qh3+ 42. Kg1 Qg4 43. Be2 Qg6 44. Bf4 Kf8 45. Bf1 Bg4 46. Nfd4 Nc5 47. Nxc5 bxc5 48. Bd3 Qb6 49. Nb3 Nd6 50. Rb1 a5 51. Nd2 Qa6 52. Rb8+ Ke7 53. Rg8 g6 54. Bg5+ f6 55. Rg7+ Kf8 56. Bh6 Nf7 57. Rxg6+ Nxh6 58. Rxh6 Qb6 59. Ne4 Qb2 60. Rxf6+ Ke8 61. Kg2 a4 62. Ra6 Qa1 63. Ra8+ Kf7 64. Ng5+ Kf6 65. Ra7 Ke5 66. f3 Bc8 67. Rc7 Qc1 1-0

Chiron 040917 (3004)
Ginkgo 2 (3042)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
6
2017.10.20
C24
Bishop’s Opening: Paulsen, 4.Nf3

1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 Nf6 3. d3 c6 4. Nf3 d5 5. Bb3 Bd6 6. exd5 cxd5 7. O-O Nc6 8. Bg5 Be6 9. c4 d4 10. Nbd2 O-O 11. Rc1 Be7 12. Re1 Nd7 13. Ne4 Bf5 14. Bxe7 Qxe7 15. Ba4 f6 16. Nfd2 Nc5 17. Nxc5 Qxc5 18. a3 Ne7 19. b4 Qc7 20. c5 Kh8 21. Qf3 Be6 22. Bb3 Bxb3 23. Nxb3 Qd7 24. Nd2 Nd5 25. Nc4 Nc3 26. Nd6 Rab8 27. Ne4 Nd5 28. g3 a6 29. Nd6 Nc3 30. Nc4 Qe6 31. Kg2 Rf7 32. h4 Kg8 33. Nd6 Rc7 34. h5 h6 35. Qf5 Qd5+ 36. Qf3 Qb3 37. Qg4 a5 38. Kh3 Kh8 39. f4 e4 40. Nxe4 Nxe4 41. Rxe4 Rg8 42. Rce1 Rcc8 43. Rxd4 Qxa3 44. c6 bxc6 45. Rd7 axb4 46. Rxg7 Qxd3 47. Ree7 Qf1+ 48. Kh2 Qf2+ 49. Kh3 Qf1+ 50. Kh2 Qf2+ 51. Kh3 Qf1+ 1/2-1/2

Fruit 3.2 (2606)
Fizbo 1.91 (2899)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
6
2017.10.20
B24
Sicilian: Closed, 3.g3

1. e4 c5 2. g3 Nc6 3. Nc3 h5 4. Nf3 d6 5. d4 cxd4 6. Nxd4 g6 7. Be3 Bg7 8. Qd2 h4 9. Bb5 Kf8 10. O-O-O Bg4 11. Be2 Bxe2 12. Qxe2 hxg3 13. fxg3 Qd7 14. Rhf1 Nf6 15. h4 Ng4 16. Bg1 Bxd4 17. Bxd4 Nxd4 18. Rxd4 Ne5 19. Qf2 Kg7 20. Kb1 b5 21. Nd5 Raf8 22. Qd2 Rc8 23. Qg5 Rce8 24. Rdd1 f6 25. Qe3 a5 26. Qb6 Nc4 27. Qf2 Ne5 28. a3 Qb7 29. c3 Rc8 30. Qe2 Ra8 31. Qe3 Qa7 32. Qd2 Rab8 33. Rf2 Rb7 34. Re2 Qc5 35. Rf2 Rhb8 36. h5 b4 37. cxb4 axb4 38. axb4 Rxb4 39. Nxb4 Rxb4 40. h6+ Kh7 41. Re2 Qb5 42. Rc1 Nc4 43. Qc3 Ra4 44. Rh2 d5 45. exd5 Na3+ 46. Ka1 Qa6 47. bxa3 Rxa3+ 48. Kb1 Rxc3 49. Rxc3 Qb7+ 50. Kc2 Qxd5 51. Kc1 Qe4 52. Rh4 Qe2 53. Ra3 f5 54. Rh1 Qc4+ 55. Kb2 Qd4+ 56. Kc1 g5 57. Rd1 Qc5+ 58. Kb2 Kxh6 59. Rc3 Qb5+ 60. Kc1 Kh5 61. Rdd3 e5 62. Rb3 Qc5+ 63. Rbc3 Qb4 64. Rb3 Qe1+ 65. Rd1 Qe2 66. Rb2 Qf3 67. Rh2+ Kg4 68. Rc2 Kxg3 69. Rg1+ Kh3 70. Re1 e4 71. Kb1 0-1

Fire 6.1 (3113)
Vajolet2 2.3.2 (2918)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
7
2017.10.20
A03
Bird: Lasker Variation

1. f4 d5 2. e3 Nf6 3. b3 Bf5 4. Nf3 e6 5. Bb2 Be7 6. Be2 O-O 7. O-O h6 8. c4 Nc6 9. Ne5 Rb8 10. Qc1 Nb4 11. cxd5 Nfxd5 12. a3 Nc6 13. Nxc6 bxc6 14. b4 c5 15. bxc5 c6 16. Be5 Rxb1 17. Rxb1 Bxb1 18. Qxb1 Qa5 19. Qc2 Bxc5 20. Kh1 Bxa3 21. e4 Nf6 22. Ra1 Qc5 23. Qd3 Bb4 24. Bd4 Qe7 25. Rxa7 Qd8 26. g3 Qb8 27. Ra4 Rd8 28. Qc4 Bxd2 29. Qc2 Be1 30. Kg2 Qb7 31. Kh3 Qd7 32. Bxf6 gxf6 33. Rc4 Rc8 34. f5 e5 35. Ra4 Kg7 36. Bc4 Bd2 37. Ra3 Qe7 38. Ra6 Qd7 39. Qd1 Rd8 40. Rb6 Qd4 41. Qg4+ Bg5 42. Rxc6 h5 43. Qe2 Qa7 44. Ra6 Qg1 45. Ra2 Rh8 46. Qf1 Qb6 47. Bd5 h4 48. Kg2 Qe3 49. gxh4 Rxh4 50. Qe2 Qh3+ 51. Kh1 Rf4 52. Ra1 Qh4 53. Qg2 Qh5 54. Rg1 Qh4 1/2-1/2

Nemorino 3.04 (2899)
Komodo 1937.00 (3230)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
7
2017.10.21
A03
Bird: 1…d5 2.Nf3 c5

1. f4 d5 2. Nf3 c5 3. b3 g6 4. Bb2 Nf6 5. e3 Bg7 6. c4 d4 7. exd4 cxd4 8. Bxd4 Nc6 9. Bc3 O-O 10. b4 e5 11. fxe5 Ne4 12. d4 Bg4 13. Be2 Nxc3 14. Nxc3 Bxf3 15. Bxf3 Nxd4 16. Bxb7 Rb8 17. Bd5 Bxe5 18. Qd3 Nf5 19. Rb1 Re8 20. Ne4 Qh4+ 21. Kd2 Qh6+ 22. Ke2 Ne7 23. g3 Nxd5 24. cxd5 f5 25. Nc5 Bxg3+ 26. Ne6 Bh4 27. Rhd1 Bf6 28. Qg3 Rbc8 29. Kf1 Rc2 30. Kg1 Rec8 31. Rb3 Rc1 32. Rb1 R1c4 33. Kh1 Rg4 34. Qf2 Be5 35. Qd2 Qh5 36. Rf1 Bxh2 37. Qxh2 Rh4 38. Rb2 Rcc4 39. Nf4 Rxh2+ 40. Rxh2 Qg4 41. Ng2 Qg3 42. Ne1 Rc1 43. Re2 f4 44. d6 Rxe1 45. Rfxe1 f3 46. d7 Qh4+ 47. Kg1 0-1

Nemorino 3.04 (2899)
Hakkapeliitta 210416 (2778)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
11
2017.10.25
D07
QGD: Chigorin, 3.Nf3 Bg4 4.cxd5 Bxf3 5.gxf3

1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. c4 Bg4 4. cxd5 Bxf3 5. gxf3 Qxd5 6. e3 O-O-O 7. Nc3 Qh5 8. f4 Qxd1+ 9. Kxd1 e6 10. Bd2 Nf6 11. Rg1 Kb8 12. Ke2 Ne7 13. Na4 Nf5 14. Bg2 Nd5 15. Be4 Nxf4+ 16. exf4 Nxd4+ 17. Kd1 b6 18. Rg3 h5 19. Rc1 g6 20. Rd3 Bg7 21. b4 h4 22. Nb2 h3 23. Nc4 Rh4 24. Bh1 Rg4 25. Be3 Kc8 26. Ne5 Bxe5 27. fxe5 Rd7 28. f3 Nf5 29. Rxd7 Kxd7 30. fxg4 Nxe3+ 31. Kd2 Nxg4 32. Re1 Nxh2 33. Rg1 Ke7 34. Ke3 g5 35. Kf2 g4 36. Rc1 Kd7 37. Bc6+ Ke7 38. Kg3 Kf8 39. Kxh2 1-0

Texel 1.07a35 (2965)
Houdini 6.02 (3184)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
11
2017.10.25
A88
Dutch: Leningrad, Main Line, 7.Nc3 c6 8.b3 Na6

1. Nf3 f5 2. g3 Nf6 3. c4 g6 4. Bg2 Bg7 5. Nc3 d6 6. d4 O-O 7. O-O c6 8. b3 Na6 9. e3 Re8 10. Bb2 Bd7 11. Ne2 Qc7 12. h3 e5 13. h4 Rad8 14. Qd2 h6 15. Rac1 e4 16. Nh2 Bc8 17. Bc3 d5 18. c5 g5 19. hxg5 hxg5 20. Rb1 Qf7 21. Ba5 Rd7 22. Rfc1 Nc7 23. Bh3 Qg6 24. Bxc7 Rxc7 25. b4 f4 26. Bxc8 f3 27. Bh3 Qh5 28. Bg2 Bh8 29. Bxf3 exf3 30. g4 Qh3 31. Nxf3 Ne4 0-1

Jonny 8.1 (3040)
Bobcat 8 (2891)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
14
2017.10.28
A03
Bird: 1…d5 2.Nf3 g6

1. f4 d5 2. Nf3 g6 3. d4 Bg7 4. c4 Nf6 5. cxd5 O-O 6. Nc3 Nxd5 7. e4 Nxc3 8. bxc3 c5 9. Be3 Bg4 10. Be2 cxd4 11. cxd4 Nc6 12. e5 Be6 13. h4 Nb4 14. h5 Rc8 15. h6 Bh8 16. Kf2 Nc2 17. Rc1 Nxe3 18. Kxe3 Bxa2 19. Qa4 Bd5 20. Qxa7 f6 21. Rxc8 Qxc8 22. Qa5 Qc6 23. Rf1 e6 24. Bd3 Qc8 25. Rb1 Qc6 26. Nd2 Bxg2 27. Bc4 fxe5 28. Rb6 exf4+ 29. Ke2 Bf1+ 30. Kxf1 Qh1+ 31. Ke2 Qh2+ 32. Kd3 Qh3+ 33. Kc2 Rc8 34. Rd6 Bf6 35. Qb6 Qf5+ 36. Kb2 Rc6 37. Qxc6 Bxd4+ 38. Kb3 bxc6 39. Bxe6+ Qxe6+ 40. Rxe6 Bc5 1-0

Komodo 1937.00 (3230)
Stockfish 041017 (3227)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
15
2017.10.29
B12
Caro-Kann: Advance, 3…c5

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 c5 4. Nf3 cxd4 5. Nxd4 Nc6 6. Nxc6 bxc6 7. Bd3 e6 8. O-O Ne7 9. Nd2 a5 10. Nf3 Ng6 11. b3 Be7 12. g3 O-O 13. Qe2 Re8 14. h4 Nf8 15. Bf4 c5 16. Nh2 a4 17. Ng4 d4 18. h5 Bb7 19. h6 g6 20. Bb5 Qd5 21. f3 Bc6 22. Bc4 Qd7 23. Kg2 Qd8 24. Rfd1 Nd7 25. b4 cxb4 26. Rxd4 Qb6 27. Qd2 Qc5 28. Rd1 Rab8 29. Be2 Bd5 30. Be3 a3 31. Bd3 Qc3 32. Qxc3 bxc3 33. Ra4 f6 34. Nxf6+ Nxf6 35. exf6 Bxf6 36. Rxa3 Ra8 37. Rxa8 Rxa8 38. Rb1 Kf7 39. Rb5 Be7 40. Bc5 Bg5 41. Bd4 Bxh6 42. Rc5 Kg8 43. Rxc3 Bf8 44. Kf2 Bd6 45. f4 g5 46. fxg5 Bxa2 47. Kg2 Bd5+ 48. Kh3 e5 49. Be3 Ra1 50. Bc4 Bf7 51. Bb3 Bxb3 52. Rxb3 Ra4 53. Rb6 Ba3 54. Rc6 Re4 55. Bd2 Kf7 56. Rf6+ Kg7 57. Ra6 Be7 58. Ra7 Kf8 59. Rc7 Re2 60. Bc1 Re1 61. Bb2 Re4 62. Kg2 Bxg5 63. Rxh7 Re2+ 64. Kf3 Rxc2 65. Rb7 Be7 66. Ke4 Re2+ 67. Kd5 Rc2 68. Bxe5 Ke8 69. Ke4 Ra2 70. Rc7 Ra4+ 71. Kf5 Ra6 72. Rb7 Kf7 73. g4 Ke8 74. Rc7 Bd6 75. Rc8+ Kf7 76. Bc3 Be7 77. Rc7 Ke8 78. g5 Bxg5 79. Kxg5 1/2-1/2

Booot 6.2 (3047)
Hakkapeliitta 210416 (2778)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
15
2017.10.29
A80
Dutch: 2.Nc3 Nf6

1. d4 f5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Bf4 e6 4. e3 d5 5. Nb5 Na6 6. Nf3 Bb4+ 7. c3 Be7 8. c4 O-O 9. Be2 dxc4 10. Bxc4 Nd5 11. Nc3 Nxf4 12. exf4 Nb4 13. Qb3 Rf6 14. a3 Nc6 15. Qd1 Qd6 16. g3 Na5 17. Ba2 Qa6 18. Rc1 b5 19. O-O Nc4 20. Nxb5 Nxb2 21. Qb3 Rb8 22. Nxc7 Rxb3 23. Nxa6 Rxf3 24. Rxc8+ Kf7 25. Nb8 Rxa3 26. Nd7 Kg6 27. Re8 Rxa2 28. Rxe7 Ra4 29. Ne5+ Kh5 30. Rxg7 Nc4 31. Rxh7+ Rh6 32. Rg7 Rf6 33. Rc1 Nxe5 34. dxe5 Rg6 35. Rd7 Rxf4 36. Rh7+ Kg5 37. Rc8 a5 38. Kg2 Rh6 1-0

Chiron 040917 (3004)
Texel 1.07a35 (2965)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
18
2017.11.01
B01
Scandinavian: 2…Qxd5 3.Nc3 Qd8

1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qd8 4. d4 Nf6 5. Nf3 e6 6. Bc4 Bb4 7. O-O O-O 8. Bg5 h6 9. Bxf6 Qxf6 10. Qe2 Bxc3 11. bxc3 Qe7 12. Bd3 Nd7 13. a4 a5 14. Rfe1 Nf6 15. Ne5 Rd8 16. Qf3 c5 17. Rad1 cxd4 18. cxd4 Qc7 19. c4 Bd7 20. Bc2 Bc6 21. Qf4 Be8 22. Rd3 Rac8 23. Rg3 Kh8 24. Rxg7 Kxg7 25. Re3 Nh5 26. Qg4+ Kf8 27. Qxh5 Rxd4 28. Qxh6+ Ke7 29. h4 Qb6 30. Qg5+ Kd6 31. Nf3 Qc5 32. Nxd4 Qxg5 33. hxg5 Rxc4 34. g6 fxg6 35. Rxe6+ Kd7 36. Re4 Rb4 37. f4 Bf7 38. Kf2 b6 39. Ke3 Ba2 40. Re5 Bf7 41. Rg5 Rb2 42. Bxg6 Ba2 1-0

Rybka 4.1 (3102)
Andscacs 0.92 (3094)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
18
2017.11.01
C00
French: Chigorin Variation

1. e4 e6 2. Qe2 d5 3. exd5 Qxd5 4. Nc3 Qa5 5. Nf3 Bd7 6. d4 Nf6 7. Bd2 Nc6 8. O-O-O O-O-O 9. Qe1 Be8 10. Bc4 Qb4 11. Qf1 Qe7 12. Qe2 Nxd4 13. Nxd4 Rxd4 14. Be3 Rxd1+ 15. Rxd1 Qb4 16. Bxa7 Bc5 17. a3 Qa5 18. Bxc5 Qxc5 19. b4 Qe7 20. Bd5 Nxd5 21. Nxd5 Qh4 22. Qe5 Qh6+ 23. Ne3 Qf6 24. Qxf6 gxf6 25. Kb2 f5 26. Rd4 h5 27. g3 b6 28. h3 Bc6 29. Rh4 f6 30. Kb3 Rd8 31. Kc3 Rh8 32. g4 f4 33. Nc4 Be8 34. a4 Bxa4 35. Rxh5 Rxh5 36. gxh5 Be8 37. h6 Bg6 38. Na3 Kd7 39. Kd2 e5 40. Nb5 c6 41. Na3 Ke6 42. Nc4 b5 43. Na5 Kd5 44. c4+ bxc4 45. Kc3 Bf5 46. Nxc4 Ke6 47. Na5 Kd5 48. Nb7 Bh7 49. Kd2 Bg8 50. Ke2 Ke6 51. Na5 Kd6 52. Kd3 Kd5 53. Kc3 Bh7 54. Kd2 Bf5 55. Nb7 Ke6 56. Ke2 Kd5 57. Kf3 Bg6 58. Kg4 Ke6 59. Na5 Kd6 60. Kf3 Bh5+ 61. Kg2 Bg6 62. f3 Kd5 63. Kf2 Bh7 64. Ke2 Bf5 65. Nb7 Ke6 66. Kd2 Ke7 67. Na5 Kd6 68. Kc3 Bg6 69. Kb2 Kc7 70. Nc4 Kd7 71. Kc1 Ke6 72. Kd2 Bf5 73. Ke2 Bh7 74. Na5 Kd6 75. Nb7+ Kc7 76. Nc5 Kd6 77. Nb3 Bf5 78. Kf2 Ke6 79. Na5 Kd6 80. Ke1 Bb1 81. Nc4+ Ke6 82. Kd1 Kf7 83. Na5 Ba2 84. Nxc6 Bd5 85. Nd8+ Kg6 86. Ke2 Kxh6 87. Kf2 Kh5 88. b5 Kh4 89. Kg2 e4 90. b6 exf3+ 91. Kf2 Kxh3 92. b7 Bxb7 93. Nxb7 Kg4 94. Nd6 Kg5 95. Nb5 Kg6 96. Nd4 Kf7 97. Kxf3 1/2-1/2

Fire 6.1 (3113)
Bobcat 8 (2891)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
18
2017.11.01
A80
Dutch: 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bg5 d5

1. d4 f5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Bg5 d5 4. Nf3 a6 5. e3 e6 6. g4 fxg4 7. Ne5 c5 8. Nxg4 Be7 9. dxc5 O-O 10. Nxf6+ Bxf6 11. Bxf6 Qxf6 12. Qd2 Nd7 13. O-O-O Nxc5 14. f4 b6 15. Bg2 Bb7 16. Kb1 Bc6 17. h4 Nb7 18. Ne2 Nd6 19. Rhg1 Rae8 20. Nd4 Bb7 21. Nf3 a5 22. Ne5 Qe7 23. h5 Nf7 24. Ng4 Nd6 25. Bf1 Nf5 26. Bd3 Qc7 27. Ne5 Rf6 28. c4 dxc4 29. Bxc4 Kh8 30. Ka1 Rff8 31. Qh2 Re7 32. Bd3 Nh6 33. Bb1 Ng8 34. h6 gxh6 35. Rg3 a4 36. Qh4 Bd5 37. Rdg1 Ref7 38. e4 Bc4 39. Qh2 Re7 40. Qg2 Nf6 41. Nxc4 Qc6 42. Ne5 Qe8 43. Qh2 Ng8 1-0

Arasan 20.2 (2741)
Rybka 4.1 (3102)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
19
2017.11.02
C00
French: Chigorin, 2…c5

1. e4 e6 2. Qe2 c5 3. d3 Nc6 4. Nf3 d6 5. g3 Be7 6. Bg2 e5 7. Nbd2 Nf6 8. c3 O-O 9. O-O Re8 10. Re1 h6 11. b3 b5 12. d4 cxd4 13. cxd4 Qb6 14. d5 Nb4 15. Nf1 a5 16. a3 Na6 17. b4 Nc7 18. Bd2 axb4 19. axb4 Ra4 20. Rac1 Bd7 21. Rc2 Qb7 22. Nh4 g6 23. Rec1 Na6 24. Rb1 Rc8 25. Rxc8+ Qxc8 26. Ne3 Bd8 27. Qd3 Bb6 28. Nf3 Kg7 29. Ne1 h5 30. Bf3 Ra2 31. Rc1 Qh8 32. N1c2 h4 33. Ra1 Rxa1+ 34. Nxa1 hxg3 35. hxg3 Nh7 36. Nac2 Ng5 37. Nf5+ gxf5 38. Bxg5 f4 39. gxf4 f6 40. fxe5 fxg5 41. e6 Be8 42. Qc3+ Kh7 43. e5 Qf8 44. Be4+ Kg8 45. Qg3 dxe5 46. Qh2 Qe7 47. Qxe5 Bc7 48. Qf5 Bf4 49. Ne3 Bxe3 50. fxe3 Nxb4 51. Qe5 Qg7 52. Qb8 Kf8 53. Qd6+ Qe7 54. Qe5 Qg7 55. Qd6+ Qe7 56. Qe5 Qg7 57. Qd6+ 1/2-1/2

Hakkapeliitta 210416 (2778)
Stockfish 041017 (3227)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
19
2017.11.02
A88
Dutch: Leningrad, Main Line, 7.Nc3 c6

1. d4 f5 2. g3 Nf6 3. c4 g6 4. Nf3 d6 5. Bg2 Bg7 6. O-O O-O 7. Nc3 c6 8. Qb3 Na6 9. Rd1 h6 10. h3 Qe8 11. c5+ d5 12. Bf4 Nd7 13. h4 e5 14. Nxd5 cxd5 15. Qxd5+ Rf7 16. Bxe5 Nxe5 17. Nxe5 Be6 18. Qf3 Bxe5 19. dxe5 Nxc5 20. Qe3 Nd7 21. Bxb7 Rd8 22. Bg2 Nf8 23. Rd6 Rxd6 24. exd6 Qa4 25. b3 Qa6 26. Rd1 Qxa2 27. b4 Qb3 28. Qxb3 Bxb3 29. Rd3 Be6 30. Bc6 Nd7 31. f4 Nb6 32. Kf2 Bd7 33. b5 Kf8 34. Kf3 h5 35. Rc3 Rf6 36. Bxd7 Nxd7 37. Rc6 Re6 38. Kf2 Ke8 39. Kf3 Nf6 40. Ra6 Ne4 41. Rxa7 Rxd6 42. Rb7 Kd8 43. Kg2 Re6 44. Kf3 Nd6 45. Rb6 Kd7 46. Rc6 Nxb5 47. Rc4 Nd6 48. Rc5 Ne4 49. Ra5 Ke7 50. Ra7+ Kf6 51. Ra1 Rb6 52. Ke3 Nxg3 53. Kf3 Ne4 54. Ke3 Rb3+ 55. Kd4 Rh3 56. Ra6+ Kg7 57. Ra7+ 0-1

Rybka 4.1 (3102)
Nemorino 3.04 (2899)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
20
2017.11.03
B00
Owen Defence: 2.d4 Bb7

1. d4 b6 2. e4 Bb7 3. Nc3 e6 4. Bd3 Nf6 5. h3 h6 6. Nge2 d6 7. O-O Be7 8. d5 exd5 9. exd5 O-O 10. Nd4 Nbd7 11. Bb5 Nxd5 12. Nxd5 Bxd5 13. Bc6 Bc4 14. Bxh6 gxh6 15. Qg4+ Kh8 16. Nf5 Bf6 17. Qxc4 Ne5 18. Qf4 Nxc6 19. Qxh6+ Kg8 20. Rae1 Nd4 21. Nxd4 Bxd4 22. Re4 f5 23. Rxd4 Qf6 24. Qxf6 Rxf6 25. Re1 Kg7 26. Rh4 Raf8 27. g3 c6 28. Kg2 c5 29. Kf3 d5 30. Kf4 d4 31. Rh5 R8f7 32. Re8 Rd6 33. Reh8 Re6 34. f3 Kf6 35. Rxf5+ Ke7 36. Rxf7+ Kxf7 37. Rh7+ Ke8 38. Rh5 c4 39. Rd5 Re2 40. Rxd4 Rxc2 41. a4 a6 42. Ke3 b5 43. Rd2 Rc1 44. axb5 axb5 45. h4 Re1+ 46. Re2 Rd1 47. g4 Kf7 48. h5 Rd8 49. f4 b4 50. g5 b3 51. Kf3 Rd1 52. Kg4 Kf8 53. h6 Rh1 54. f5 Rg1+ 1-0

Chiron 040917 (3004)
Ginkgo 2 (3042)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
6
2017.10.20
C24
Bishop’s Opening: Paulsen, 4.Nf3

1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 Nf6 3. d3 c6 4. Nf3 d5 5. Bb3 Bd6 6. exd5 cxd5 7. O-O Nc6 8. Bg5 Be6 9. c4 d4 10. Nbd2 O-O 11. Rc1 Be7 12. Re1 Nd7 13. Ne4 Bf5 14. Bxe7 Qxe7 15. Ba4 f6 16. Nfd2 Nc5 17. Nxc5 Qxc5 18. a3 Ne7 19. b4 Qc7 20. c5 Kh8 21. Qf3 Be6 22. Bb3 Bxb3 23. Nxb3 Qd7 24. Nd2 Nd5 1/2-1/2

This game may not have been played. Found it under the Johnny-Houdini game Nov 3. Clicked refresh and then obtained actual game.

Andscacs 0.92 (3094)
Fizbo 1.91 (2899)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
21
2017.11.04
B10
Caro-Kann: Breyer Variation

1. e4 c6 2. d3 d5 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. e5 Ng8 5. Be2 Bf5 6. O-O e6 7. d4 a5 8. b3 Ne7 9. c4 Bg6 10. Nh4 Nd7 11. Nc3 Nf5 12. Nxf5 Bxf5 13. g4 Bg6 14. f4 Bb4 15. Na4 f5 16. a3 Be7 17. Be3 b6 18. Nc3 Rc8 19. Rf2 O-O 20. g5 Bf7 21. Bf3 Be8 22. h4 h6 23. Raa2 g6 24. Rh2 h5 25. Rhf2 Rf7 26. Qc1 Nf8 27. Rfc2 a4 28. bxa4 dxc4 29. Qb1 Qc7 30. Be2 Qa7 31. Bxc4 Bd8 32. Qb3 Rfc7 33. Rc1 Rb8 34. Be2 Rcc8 35. Bf2 Qa8 36. Bf3 Qa6 37. Qb1 b5 38. Qd3 Qa5 39. Qd1 Be7 40. Raa1 Rc7 41. Kg2 Rcc8 42. Kg3 Kg7 43. Be1 Qb6 44. Qd3 Kg8 45. axb5 cxb5 46. Bf2 Qa5 47. d5 Bc5 48. Be3 Bxe3 49. Qxe3 Rc4 50. Ne2 Nd7 51. dxe6 Nc5 52. Bd5 Ne4+ 53. Kg2 Rxc1 54. e7+ Bf7 55. e6 Be8 56. Rxc1 b4 57. Bxe4 fxe4 58. axb4 Qxb4 59. Qc3 Qb7 60. Qc7 Qb2 61. Kf2 Kh7 62. Rc3 Rb3 63. Qe5 Rxc3 64. Qxc3 Qb1 65. Qf6 Qb6+ 66. Kg2 Qa6 67. Ng3 e3 68. Kh3 e2 69. Qe5 Qa3 70. Qxe2 Kg8 71. Qe5 Qb4 72. Qc7 Kh7 73. Qd8 Qb5 74. Qd4 Qa6 75. Qe5 Qa4 1-0

Arasan 20.2 (2741)
Laser 200917 (2660)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
21
2017.11.04
A80
Dutch: 2.Nc3 Nf6

1. d4 f5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Bf4 d6 4. Nf3 c6 5. e3 Nh5 6. Bc4 Nxf4 7. exf4 b5 8. Bb3 a5 9. a3 d5 10. O-O Nd7 11. Nxd5 cxd5 12. Bxd5 Ra6 13. Qe2 Rf6 14. Rfe1 Ba6 15. Ng5 Nb6 16. Be6 Qc7 17. a4 Bb7 18. axb5 h6 19. Qe5 Qd6 20. Qxd6 exd6 21. Bd5+ Kd8 22. Bxb7 hxg5 23. Bc6 a4 24. b3 Rfh6 25. h3 Be7 26. bxa4 d5 27. a5 Nc8 28. Bxd5 gxf4 29. b6 Bd6 30. c4 Re8 31. Rxe8+ Kxe8 32. a6 Bb8 33. a7 Bxa7 34. bxa7 Nxa7 35. Rxa7 Rd6 1-0

Nemorino 3.04 (2899)
Fire 6.1 (3113)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
21
2017.11.04
A80
Dutch: 2.Nf3

1. d4 f5 2. Nf3 g6 3. Bf4 Bg7 4. e3 d6 5. Nc3 Nf6 6. Bc4 e6 7. a3 O-O 8. Ba2 a5 9. h4 Qe8 10. Qe2 Kh8 11. Bc4 Bd7 12. Nb5 Na6 13. O-O-O h6 14. Bh2 Ng4 15. Bg3 e5 16. dxe5 dxe5 17. Nh2 Nf6 18. Nf3 Ne4 19. Ng5 Nxg3 20. fxg3 e4 21. Nh3 Nc5 22. Nf4 Bxb5 23. Bxb5 c6 24. Bc4 h5 25. Rd6 Rf6 26. Rd4 b5 27. Ba2 b4 28. Rhd1 Kh7 29. Qc4 Qe5 30. c3 bxa3 31. bxa3 Qe7 32. Kc2 Rb8 33. a4 Kh6 34. R1d2 Rb7 35. Kd1 Nd7 36. Qa6 Ne5 37. Qa8 Ng4 38. Rd8 Nxe3+ 39. Ke2 Ng4 40. Ne6 e3 41. Rc2 Rxe6 42. Bxe6 Nf6 43. Rh8+ Bxh8 44. Qxh8+ Nh7 45. Qe5 Nf6 46. Qxe3+ Kg7 47. Bc8 Nd5 48. Qxe7+ Rxe7+ 49. Kf3 Re3+ 50. Kf2 Rxc3 51. Rxc3 Nxc3 52. Bb7 Nxa4 53. Bxc6 Nc5 54. Ke3 a4 55. Kd2 Ne4+ 56. Kc2 a3 57. Be8 Nxg3 58. Bb5 f4 59. Bc4 Nf5 60. Kb1 Nxh4 61. Ba2 0-1

Gaviota 1.01 (2757)
Stockfish 041017 (3227)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
21
2017.11.04
A88
Dutch: Leningrad, Main Line, 7.Nc3 c6 8.Qc2

1. d4 f5 2. c4 Nf6 3. Nf3 g6 4. Nc3 Bg7 5. g3 d6 6. Bg2 O-O 7. O-O c6 8. Qc2 Na6 9. a3 Qe8 10. Rd1 e5 11. d5 cxd5 12. Nxd5 Nxd5 13. Rxd5 e4 14. Nd4 Nc7 15. Rxd6 Qe7 16. c5 Ne8 17. Qc4+ Kh8 18. Rd5 Nc7 19. Rd6 Ne8 20. Rd5 Nc7 21. Rd6 Ne8 1/2-1/2

Laser 200917 (2660)
Nemorino 3.04 (2899)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
22
2017.11.05
A03
Bird: Lasker, 3…e6

1. f4 d5 2. e3 Nf6 3. Nf3 e6 4. Be2 c5 5. b3 Be7 6. O-O O-O 7. Bb2 b6 8. c4 Bb7 9. Na3 Ne8 10. Qb1 Nc6 11. Kh1 a6 12. f5 Bf6 13. fxe6 fxe6 14. cxd5 exd5 15. Ng5 Bxg5 16. Rxf8+ Kxf8 17. Qxh7 Ke7 18. Rf1 Kd7 19. Rf7+ Be7 20. Qh5 Kc7 21. Be5+ Nd6 22. Bg3 b5 23. Qxd5 Kb6 24. Rxe7 Nxe7 25. Qxd6+ Qxd6 26. Bxd6 Rd8 27. Nxb5 axb5 28. Bxe7 Rxd2 29. Bf3 c4 30. bxc4 bxc4 31. e4 c3 32. h4 c2 33. Ba3 Rd1+ 34. Kh2 Kb5 35. Kg3 Ka4 36. Bb2 Rb1 37. Bxg7 c1=Q 38. Bf6 0-1

Texel 1.07a35 (2965)
Fire 6.1 (3113)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
23
2017.11.06
B10
Caro-Kann: 2.Ne2

1. e4 c6 2. Ne2 e5 3. d4 Nf6 4. dxe5 Nxe4 5. Be3 d5 6. Nd2 Nc5 7. g3 Nbd7 8. f4 f6 9. b4 Na4 10. e6 Ndb6 11. f5 Nb2 12. Qb1 N6c4 13. Nxc4 Nxc4 14. Bd4 Na3 15. Qd1 Bxb4+ 16. c3 Bd6 17. Nf4 O-O 18. Bd3 b6 19. O-O c5 20. Be3 Bb7 21. Rf2 Qe7 22. Ng6 Qc7 23. Nxf8 d4 24. Bf4 Qc6 25. Qf3 Qxf3 26. Rxf3 Bxf8 27. Rf2 c4 28. Bf1 dxc3 29. Re1 Bb4 30. Bc1 b5 31. Rd1 Nb1 32. Rd7 Bc6 33. Bg2 Bxd7 34. Bxa8 Be8 35. Rg2 Kf8 36. Kf2 Ke7 37. g4 Ba3 38. Be3 b4 39. Be4 Nd2 40. Bc5+ Kd8 41. Bc2 Bc6 42. Ke3 b3 43. Rxd2+ cxd2 44. Bxa3 bxc2 45. Kxd2 Bf3 46. g5 fxg5 47. Kxc2 Be4+ 48. Kc3 Bxf5 49. e7+ Kd7 50. Kxc4 a6 51. Kd4 Bb1 52. Bc1 h6 53. Ba3 Bxa2 54. Bb4 Bb1 55. Kd5 Ke8 56. Kd6 Ba2 57. Bc3 g6 58. Bf6 g4 59. Bg7 h5 60. Bf6 a5 61. Kc5 Bf7 62. Kd4 a4 63. Kc3 a3 64. Kc2 Kd7 65. Kd2 a2 66. Kc1 Ke6 67. Bg7 0-1

Authorities Crack Down On Go Players Using Phones

It was just a matter of time as far as I was concerned until the Go community would be forced to take action when I posted on Go forums prophesying about the actions which would be necessary in the near future to prevent cheating with use of computer programs during play. This was before the rise of AlphaGo and I was excoriated unmercifully for even saying such a thing. After all, Go was not Chess, and most so-called “experts” were predicting it would be another decade before any computer program would rival even lower level Dan players. In reality it was closer to ten months before the Go community was in for a “rude awakening.”

Chess GM Alexander Morozevich, who has also been in the news for playing Go recently, spoke about this in a recent interview with Murad Amannazarov when he was asked, “So it’s only a hobby?” Morozevich answered the question, “Well, of course it’s a hobby. Go can’t be my profession, I understand that perfectly well. It’s not that I’ve been disappointed in chess and decided to start from scratch, because it’s clear that I’ve got neither the time, opportunity nor anything else in order to become a professional there. For me it feels more like I’ve learned a foreign language i.e. if I learned something like Spanish, Chinese, Arabic or some other language I’d also need to practice it from time to time and that, of course, would surprise no-one. It turned out that I “learned a language” – I got acquainted with playing Go, it really drew me in and it’s the first game after chess that has really enthralled me. To some extent I’ve learned to play it, which by analogy is like someone more or less acquiring a language at a beginner level. Then he travels either to the country or finds some native speakers, or he reads books i.e. he develops that in some way. I do more or less the same: I go along, I chat, sometimes I play tournaments, but it’s clear that it’s only as a hobby, of course. It’s not a new job, or a new profession, or a new path. At least from the point of view of achieving any results I don’t have any illusions. I’m 40 years old and that would be extremely naïve. I understand perfectly well that there are roughly ten thousand 10-year-old Go players who would beat me. Therefore you have to understand that if you’re competing with millions and among them you’re roughly in the 4th million, or something like that, then no doubt there’s no point having any great illusions.

A different issue is that somehow I see very similar processes in what Go is going through and what happened in chess 10-15 years ago. That’s all happening to them and is comparable to what happened to us – it’s not even retro-analysis but as if you have another view of the process that we already saw in chess. When the first computers came along they gradually gained momentum, became stronger and stronger, and the way chess players reacted to that then, what they expected of where it would lead, how they began to use them – the same is now happening, the same computer revolution, only it’s as if it’s only just begun. Until 2015 that was the only intellectual game in which professionals were stronger than machines, and only in the last year or year and a half have the first harbingers appeared saying that yes, the end of Go has come. For now it’s not quite formalized, but gradually, I think, they’ll follow the same path that we followed in chess. Machines, of course, will take up an absolutely dominant position, despite the fact that of course the calculating algorithms, the evaluation algorithms are quite different. As far as I understand it the algorithm used by AlphaGo, the most successful program, is a Monte Carlo algorithm. That was also one of the main computational approaches in chess, but it didn’t become common. Machines reached a maximum of 2400 with that. After all, our game is about more direct selection, while there it was possible even to use that algorithm, which is quite interesting.”

I highly recommend anyone interested in either game read this excellent interview with one of the more interesting minds in the world of games.
(https://chess24.com/en/read/news/morozevich-on-go-computers-and-cheating)

An article published recently in the Global Times:

Authorities getting stricter about Go players using their phones at a match in China

China’s top authority for the game Go recently announced a ban on phones at Go matches in response to the increasing use of artificial intelligence (AI) in the sport.

According to a notice released by the Chinese Weiqi Association (CWA) on Tuesday, “during matches, players are not allowed to have or watch mobile phones and any other electronic devices. If they are found with one of the devices, they will be judged losers immediately.”

Players are also forbidden to leave the room during a break in the matches, unless they have special needs and are acccompanied by a judge.

For team events, if the team leaders or coaches use AI technology in connection with the match, the entire team’s score for the round will be declared invalid.

The new regulation covers all upcoming matches of China’s professional Go league in 2017, with further expected in 2018.

AI technology has been used on some board games with great success.

On a related note, Georgian chess champion Gaioz Nigalidze was thrown out of the Dubai Open in 2015 for regularly leaving the table to check his mobile phone which he had hidden in a toilet cubicle, the Washington Post reported.

AlphaGo, a Google AI program, claimed a 3-0 clean sweep on May 27 over China’s Ke Jie, the current world No.1 Go player, after defeating many other top players.

“AlphaGo has done a splendid job,” 19-year-old Ke, a native of Lishui, Zhejiang, told a postgame press conference.

Go, or weiqi in Chinese, involves two players who take turns putting white and black stones on a grid of 19 x 19 lines. Victory over an opponent involves advancing over more territory on the grid.

http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/1073115.shtml

If caught cheating I assume the perpetrator would be forced to do a “perp walk” with the only question being, “Would you like a blindfold?” There are some, if not most, officials in FIDE, such as Zurab Azmaiparashvili, who would dispense with the blindfold and even possibly even the perp walk. For those unaware, Canadian GM Anton Kovalyov, after knocking former World Human Chess Champion Viswanathan Anand out of the World Cup, was accosted by the bombastic organizer of the event, GM Zurab Azmaiparashvili for wearing Bermuda shorts even they are deemed acceptable by the world Chess organization, FIDE, a few minutes before beginning the game with his next opponent. As stated by numerous witnesses, Azmaiparashvili’s unnecessary diatribe would have rattled even the most stable Chess player.

(http://www.spraggettonchess.com/fide-psychopath-at-large/)

See also the article Psychopathy in Tbilisi, by GM Kevin Spraggett on his excellent blog in which he prints the official FIDE rule:

3 Dress code for players during games in progress

3 a. The following is acceptable for men players, captains, head of delegation.

Suits, ties, dressy pants, trousers, jeans, long-sleeve or shirt-sleeve dress shirt, alternatively T-shirts or polo, dress-shoes, loafers or dressy slip-ons, socks, shoes or sneakers, sport coat, blazer, Bermuda shorts, turtleneck, jacket, vest or sweater. Team uniforms and national costumes clothing.

http://www.spraggettonchess.com/psychopathy-in-tbilisi/

Another excellent commentary of the sordid affair is: https://laregledujeu.org/arrabal/2017/09/10/8209/a-n-t-o-n-k-o-v-a-l-y-o-v-grand-maitre-international/

Techmate

An article, Tech mate? Top grandmaster claims chess is riddled with cheats using smartphones, By Leon Watson, appeared in The Telegraph 21 Mar 2015. It must have flown under the radar because it was not mentioned by other chess based websites. It now seems prescient because underneath the headline one reads, “Daniel Gormally suggests many chess players now disappear to the toilet with their smartphones during games to work out their next move.” (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/law-and-order/11487515/Tech-mate-Top-grandmaster-claims-chess-is-riddled-with-cheats-using-smartphones.html)

“The genteel world of British chess has been rocked after a top grandmaster claimed the game of kings is riddled with cheats.”

Daniel Gormally, 38, suggested the game is facing an epidemic of people popping to the loo during competitions and using mobile phones to work out their next move.

Mobile apps such as Droidfish and Shredder have made it easy to play chess on the move and analyse complex positions with so-called “chess engines”.

But despite handsets being banned in most tournaments on the English circuit, Gormally said there is nothing to stop players hiding in cubicles with them.”

“Gormally, from Durham, said: “There’s a few players in English chess whose ‘improvement’ I’ve found a bit suspicious, to say the least. But I won’t name any names.

“The worrying thing is the amount of chess players who cheat at chess, a game with very little money in it.”

Gormally, ranked 13 by the English Chess Federation, went on to say he believes chess is no different to sports like cycling which have been embroiled major drug taking scandals.

“The problem is that computers are so powerful,” he added. “It’s just a shame because now when you see someone have a significant improvement you think ‘hang on, wait a minute’ and it shouldn’t be that way.

“Of course, you can’t prove it. If somebody wants to go to the toilet once or twice in a match you wouldn’t be suspicious, but they could easily look at their phone and gain a significant improvement.”

“I don’t think it happens at the top level because they would get found out. The top players have press conferences after their matches and have to explain all their moves. But its at the lower level where it is a problem.”

Until GM Gaioz Nigalidze was caught with his pants down and his engine up, this has been the accepted, conventional wisdom. The administrators of chess have tried to either ignore, or talk the problem to death. They failed, because it lives.

Who is Daniel Gormally? ” Gormally himself hit the headlines in 2006 – although for other reasons.

He was involved in a drunken punch-up in a nightclub after he saw a rival dancing with a female player, dubbed the “Anna Kournikova of chess”.

Gormally had struck up an email relationship with 19-year-old Aussie Arianne Caoili and was accused of hitting and shoving world number three Levon Aronian when he spotted the Armenian with her.

The day after the bust-up at a tournament in Turin, Italy, Gormally was attacked by fans of Aronian.”

That would not happen today because the best players are not old enough to drink an adult beverage.

“Telegraph chess correspondent Malcolm Pein, who runs the top level London Chess Classic tournament, said he is not aware of any allegations of cheating in the English game and the game is clamping down on the use of technology.

He added: “The chess community is very aware of the possibility of cheating and measures are being taken to prevent it.

“There are metal detectors now at some tournaments and all electronic devices are banned at most. At the London Chess Classic, which I run, the arbiters observe the audience to check for suspicious behaviour.

“Were there to be a drug invented that makes you better at chess, I would give it to my children and boost their exam results.”

Most parents would probably do the same thing with their children because they have done exactly that with all kind of psychotropic drugs without having any idea what effects the drugs will produce later in life. The next generation should be called the “guinea pig” generation. At least adult guinea pigs get paid. (http://www.gpgp.net/)

“The English Chess Federation’s chief executive Phil Ehr denied cheating is widespread in the game and said he is aware of only one English player in the past four years who was caught cheating with a mobile phone.”

This is typical of the F.I.P.s in control of chess today. They are in denial, and have been all of the early part of this century. During the broadcast of the last round of the US Open Championship, and the ancillary tournament reserved for women not strong enough to make the Open a film was played of GM Maurice Ashely interviewing Yuliya Levitan, a counselor on the FIDE anti-cheating commission. She was there to spout the party line while singing, “Everything is beautiful, in its own way”…and “Don’t worry/be happy.” The woman ran down a list of things FIDE is doing to thwart cheating, including “…players not having cellphones on them.”

The latest gizmo wizard, who will forever be known as the “Dubai Cheater,” GM Gaioz Nigalidze, did not have a gizmo on him. He beat FIDE by leaving it in the toilet, which is where some say FIDE is headed. Yuliya mentioned something about “…keeping fans separate.” Maybe that should apply to a manager like Silvio Danilov.

She mentioned something about cameras, which made me think of the old TV show, Candid Camera, as in, “Smile, you’re on candid camera! Euuww, what ARE you doing?” FIDE will go ANYWHERE to prevent cheating! Anywhere but Russia, where in a tournament like Aeroflot, players conspire to draw games in the opening and, who knows, maybe even throw games, as happened between the nefarious Russians in the last round of the recent 2015 European Championship. She also mentioned “metal detectors,” and one could not help but notice the security guard behind Maurice holding, you guessed it, a metal detector.

Ms. Levitan also mentioned something about “…investigations going on. I cannot comment on those.” Too bad someone is not investigating FIDE…

The interview comes at the 3:06 mark and you can watch it, which is exactly what I did again. I wanted to make sure I quoted the woman correctly. She said, “Once again, more concern for the open tournaments. It does not happen often in professional chess…it does happen on higher level, but usually it happens on lower levels.”

Until the “Dubai Cheater,” GM Gaioz Nigalidze, this has been the “party-line.” The cat is now out of the bag, or should I say the genie is out of the bottle. Every result the “Dubai Cheater” has ever had is now suspect. Actually, one could drop the “Dubai Cheater” and just say that every FIDE result is suspect.

Tony Rich is The Arbiter

Tony Rich is the Chief Arbiter of the 2015 US Championships. Wesley So was until this tournament, one of the top ten highest rated chess players in the world. Mr. Rich had previously warned Mr. So about taking notes during the game, which is a violation of the rules of FIDE, the governing body of world chess. During the game between Wesley So and Varuzhan Akobian in today’s ninth round the latter brought it to the attention of the Chief Arbiter that Mr. So was violating the rules of chess. The Chief Arbiter, Tony Rich, then forfeited Wesley So.

As I watched the live coverage today my thoughts drifted back to last decade when I, too, had to go into the back room with of the St. Louis Chess Club and Scholastic Center with the arbiter during a tournament. Fortunately I was not the one forfeited. Until today the incident in which I was involved at the relatively new St. Louis Chess Club and Scholastic Center with a young boys father in which the latter told his son to violate a rule by continuing to look at the chessboard on his Monroi gizmo in lieu of the actual chessboard, even though the father had promised to not advise his son to do so, was the most egregious incident to ever occur at the Scholastic Center and Chess Club. The incident is still brought up and discussed. Thanks to Wesley So, it may well forgotten.

The Future of Chess

“The phrase, “All politics is local” is a common phrase in U.S. politics. The former Speaker of the U.S. House Tip O’Neill is most closely associated with this phrase, which encapsulates the principle that a politician’s success is directly tied to the person’s ability to understand and influence the issues of their constituents.” (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_politics_is_local)

The world of chess is beset with myriad problems. For example, consider something recently written by GM Kevin Spraggett on his blog, Spraggett on Chess:

RIP: Canadian Open Championship (1956-2014)

“For my readers (Canadian and international) who were wondering about the 2015 edition of Canada’s most PRESTIGIOUS tournament, I have sad news. Not only has the 2015 Canadian Open been cancelled, but it is unlikely to be resurrected in coming years. The present mind-set of the CFC executive is to concentrate on junior chess and slowly (quickly!) phase out adult chess.

The writing was on the wall for some time now, but few wanted to believe it. Despite a well documented decline in adult membership in the CFC since 2007, and calls to organize a membership drive to remedy the situation, the CFC refused to act. Adult membership levels are now 50% of normal levels. All funding of adult-programs have been eliminated.”

Grant Oen is a junior at Emory University, Grant is a 2-time GA Collegiate Chess Champion, 2-time NJ Grade Level Chess Champion, manager of the 2014 Atlanta Kings Team, and current Emory Chess Club President. He is one of the people who are the future of chess, and the future is NOW! I have come to admire and respect Grant because he is GREAT for chess in my home state.

I received an email from Mr. Oen a short time ago, and after reading it, sent an email asking for permission to post it on the blog, which was granted. Although it may be true that “all politics is local,” what happens in my home state of Georgia, just as what happens in our wonderful neighbor to the north, Canada, affects the Royal game in the WORLD. It is not just the worldwide governing body of chess, FIDE, that impacts chess, fortunately. Chess stays viable because of the efforts of those in, for example, New Zealand, even though you may not here of what is going on with chess there, unless you make an effort do so. When the chess lights go out, for whatever reason, in any town, city, state, or nation, it has a negative impact on the game of chess. I urge you to read what Grant has to say, and to forward it to anyone and everyone, and ask them to do the same. “In chaos theory, the butterfly effect is the sensitive dependence on initial conditions in which a small change in one state of a deterministic nonlinear system can result in large differences in a later state.”
(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butterfly_effect)
I believe there is a “butterfly effect.” I also believe that “Those who don’t know history are doomed to repeat it.” What has happened to chess in my home state of Georgia is tragic. I can only hope that you who read this learn from the recent mistakes made here and do not let it happen in your part of the chess world.

“Good evening,

First, I’d like to thank many of you for supporting Southeast Chess in its first year of tournaments. Since our first event in March 2014, we have run over 25 events, attracting 250+ unique players from 15 states. Despite being a small operation, we have offered large open tournaments, scholastics, invitationals, Grand Prix, blitz, and action tournaments which have become a staple in the chess landscape in Georgia, and will continue to do so going forward.

Southeast Chess recognizes the following players for participating in 6 or more of our events in our first year:

Shanmukha Meruga – 22 tournaments
Grant Oen – 21
Frank Johnson – 16
Kapish Potula – 10
Amaan Pirani – 8
Sijing Wu – 8
Saithanusri Avirneni – 7
William Remick – 6
Phillip Taylor – 6
Rochelle Wu – 6

I would also like to express my personal opinions on the upcoming GCA election. The following positions are up for election at this year’s State Championship:

President: Fun Fong (incumbent), Frank Johnson
Secretary: Herky del Mundo, Greg Maness
2nd Member at Large: Steve Schneider, Ashley Thomas

The remaining board positions, not up for election this year, are filled by Vice Presidents Ben Johnson and Katie Hartley, Treasurer Amrita Kumar, and 1st Member at Large Laura Doman.

I will be voting the following ticket – President: Frank Johnson, Secretary: Herky del Mundo, 2nd Member at Large: Ashley Thomas. To have a positive say in the future of the GCA landscape, I strongly encourage you to do the same.

The GCA is in a long period of deterioration under the current administration. While scholastics have shown relative success in recent years, the GCA’s organization of open tournaments has proven to be a terrible insult to our royal game. The lethargic, unorganized, and indecisive “organization” under President Fong has devastated the hundreds of chess players in Georgia. Developing youngsters and seasoned masters alike have not been shown any respect as players by the GCA.

Fun Fong, additionally, has not fulfilled his designated role as GCA President. Supposedly, the responsibilities undertaken by his office are to support chess in Georgia through and through. However, Fun has shown a clear conflict of interest in only supporting the GCA’s events, and not providing any measure of support to the rest of the community.

For example, when former Emory Chess Club President Jeff Domozick and I were developing the idea for Southeast Chess to fill a meaningful gap in Georgia, we approached Fun to hear his thoughts and potential improvements on our business plans. His response could not have been more negative – he was critical of our idea, and warned us of the dangers and difficulties of running tournaments, strongly suggesting us to abandon the venture.

Of course, we were persistent, and although Jeff graduated Emory in Spring 2014, I have continued the Southeast Chess enterprise and hope that many of you would agree that it is a professionally-run and successful tournament business. Similar stories regarding Fun have been echoed by American Chess Promotions owner Thad Rogers and North Georgia Chess owner Kevin Schmuggerow, both of whom I greatly respect for their pursuits as chess organizers.

Throughout his tenure as GCA President, Fun has shown a clear preference for having all chess activities remain under the flailing umbrella of the GCA, and shuns all other ventures. Throughout Southeast Chess’ infancy, Fun was loathe to extend us help of any kind, threatening us not to use any TDs under the GCA’s umbrella. The President of the GCA should simply support all chess events in Georgia. Fun’s unprofessional behavior overall has led to many resignations on the GCA board and its subcommittees. Support for Fong among the rank and file in Georgia chess has been all but diminished.

Of course, there are many other reasons for which I could criticize the incumbent candidate (print magazine extinct, abuse of power, no support for players, school programs, or organizers), but I am of course also obligated to mention why I am voting for Frank Johnson.

Frank has significant chess experience in all capacities. He is an avid player, organizer, director, project manager, coach, parent, former GCA secretary, and overall chess supporter. He supports tournaments all across the state and country, and organizes and directs his own events under the popular Chess-coach.net label. He has years of experience and knowledge in working with developing chess communities, and has sponsored hundreds of local formal and informal chess meetups in the greater Atlanta area, including Atlanta Chess Mess.

As a personal aside, Frank proved essential in helping Southeast Chess get off the ground by providing critical organizational advice, helping to market the events, and playing in them himself. He served in an important management position in the Atlanta Kings chess team, a co-venture between my friend Thad Rogers and I.

Frank has shown significant expertise in all arenas of Georgia chess. Most importantly, he in unbiased in his vision to move the chess community forward. Right now there is a disconnect between players, organizers, and the GCA. Frank has essential plans in place for removing this disconnect for the benefit of all parties. He is a true chess professional who, as President, will develop the GCA into the association it should be. If you have questions or comments for Frank, he is always available at frankjohnson@chess-coach.net.

For the office of secretary, I support Herky del Mundo, organizer of the Atlanta Chess Club, active tournament player, director, and supporter. Herky has been influential in the outreach to GM Mark Paragua for the annual state championship. For the 2nd Member at Large position, I support Ashley Thomas, a long-time chess parent and player.

The election is open to current GCA members 18 years or older who have paid the $15 annual dues in the last year. A current membership is also required for Georgia players in play in the State Championship. The election will be held on Sunday, April 26 at 2:30pm, between rounds 4 and 5 of the Georgia State Championship in the Hotel Wyndham Hotel Galleria. If you are interested in voting but will not attend the state championship, email secretary@georgiachess.org to request an absentee ballot by 4/12, and have it returned to the secretary by the beginning of the tournament on 4/24.

Please remember to vote, as each eligible member can have a meaningful say towards change in the future of Georgia Chess.

Thank you.”

Grant

Pentagon Study Claims Putin Has Asperger’s Syndrome

“A study from a Pentagon think tank theorizes that Russian President Vladimir Putin has Asperger’s syndrome, “an autistic disorder which affects all of his decisions,” according to the 2008 report obtained by USA TODAY.” (http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2015/02/04/putin-aspergers-syndrome-study-pentagon/22855927/)

I write this because Vladimir Putin is the power behind the world chess organization, FIDE. Kirsan ET Illuminatus is only a titular figurehead.

I know something about the effects of Asperger’s syndrome because a friend, also a chess player “back in the day,” was diagnosed with it. Upon first reading about Asperger’s I got in touch with my friend because what I read described him. He informed me he felt the same, and scientist’s wanted to study him as he was considered the quintessential exemplar of the disorder. He did not wish to be studied then, but came to regret his decision later. As he described it at that time, Asperger’s syndrome is basically a high functioning autistic person. Much more is known about the disorder now.

“Asperger syndrome is an autism spectrum disorder that is characterized by significant difficulties in social interaction and nonverbal communication, alongside restricted and repetitive patterns of behavior and interests. It differs from other autism spectrum disorders by its relative preservation of linguistic and cognitive development.” (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asperger_syndrome)

I could have used WebMD.com (http://www.webmd.com/brain/autism/mental-health-aspergers-syndrome) but decided to use Wiki because my friend loathed Wikipedia, much preferring Encyclopaedia Britannica. I brought to his attention an article reporting on a comparison of Wiki with EB in which the number of mistakes found was about the same. He simply refused to believe it. New ways often come hard to those who are fortunate enough to grow old(er).

“The diagnosis of Asperger’s was eliminated in the 2013 fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) and replaced by a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder on a severity scale.” (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asperger_syndrome)

When this was first proposed it caused my friend much consternation. As is the case with many people with Asperger syndrome my friend also suffered with clinical depression. From what I have read about Bobby Fischer his inherited mental illness grew worse as he aged, just as it had with his real father, Dr. Paul Nemenyi. The same happened to my friend. Having known him as an intelligent and vibrant man when younger, with not one, but two PhDs, it was difficult to see him deteriorate before my eyes. Even though other people in the chess community counseled me to be extremely careful about being around someone who is severely depressed because of the fear it could have a deleterious effect upon me, I ignored their advice because he was my friend and had asked for my help.

His depression grew to the point the only thing that would help was extremely strong drugs. They would help for a short while until toxic levels would build in his blood and the doctors would be forced to stop drug treatment altogether, with my friend begging them to please continue. The doctors would then find some new drug and the cycle would repeat. My friend lived in fear of reaching a point when there would be no new drug to try.

It was at this point that my friend was offered a new experimental therapy, Transcranial Magnetic Polarization Therapy. He was happy at the prospect of being cured of his malady, as happy as a person suffering from clinical depression can be, I suppose. Since he was no longer capable of digesting what he read I was asked to do the research. He waited patiently as I read everything on the subject. He was crestfallen when I tendered my report. The statistics promulgated by those doing the zappin’ were not as good as promised. I found that for some of those counted as being helped by the zappin’ the effect did not last. After all those hours reading studies I concluded his chances of success were less than fifty percent. I also found it strange that it was difficult to ascertain the negative effects of the zappin’. Nevertheless, my friend decided upon the procedure, as if there had been any question he would not, because when a drowning man is thrown a life vest he will grasp it, and hold on for dear life.

I drove my friend to and from the procedure for weeks. It was obvious there were no positive results, which caused him to go even deeper into his depression. It seemed to me what he was undergoing only tended to exacerbate an already tenuous situation. The scientists decided to ramp up the juice and when that did not show positive results they jolted him with even more juice until a threshold was crossed and my friend was in uncharted territory where no man had gone before. They finally stopped, having to admit the treatment was a failure, something they were extremely reluctant to do because there is big money involved. Later there was a question about whether the insurance company would pay for the treatment. My friend had been so desperate he had paid some money out of pocket, expecting the insurance company to reimburse him, and so had the company. There was a lawsuit and the company won, and my friend was sent a rather large check in the mail.

I mention this because I know from personal experience just how dangerous a man is Vladimir Putin. When Richard Nixon found himself cornered during Watergate, he was found wandering around the White House talking to pictures of those who had previously held the office of POTUS. Putin’s wife divorced him recently and the walls around him are closing in. He is like the rat he cornered as a young boy. His mind is deteriorating rapidly, and he has his finger on the nuclear trigger. “The world is “3 minutes” from doomsday. That’s the grim outlook from board members of The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists.”

With what I have learned about those with Asperger syndrome and depression, I would say the clock should be something like 30 seconds from midnight.