Stupid Republican Governor Kemp Leads Georgia Into Twilight Zone

Why Georgia Isn’t Ready to Reopen, in Charts

By Nathaniel Lash and Gus Wezerek
April 24, 2020

 

Do you see a trend? Does it appear things in the Great state of Georgia are improving? If you flip the order it may be time to reopen. Obviously things are getting worse rather than improving. Only a stupid idiot would consider reopening the economy under these conditions. Georgia REPUBLICAN Governor Brian Kemp could care less about the number of Georgia citizens who will die because of his stupidity.

One would think that when the imbecile POTUS criticizes the risky, to say the least, move by the governor, Brian Kemp would have had second thoughts about opening for business too soon, but NOooooooo! The REPUBLICAN mantra of “Death for Dollars” is in full bloom in my home state.

Experts and the President criticize Kemp’s move

Health experts have criticized the move to reopen Georgia, saying it’s too soon and risks setting off another wave of infections. President Donald Trump at first applauded Kemp for his aggressive plan to restart the economy, a source told CNN, then publicly bashed him during news briefings.

“I told the governor of Georgia, Brian Kemp, that I disagree strongly with his decision to open certain facilities,” Trump said. “But, at the same time, he must do what he thinks is right.”

https://www.cnn.com/2020/04/24/us/georgia-coronavirus-reopening-businesses-friday/index.html

Atlanta mayor: It’s like we’re living in ‘Twilight Zone’

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms

https://cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/200424090359-atlanta-mayor-keisha-lance-bottoms-exlarge-169.jpg

pleads for residents to stay home, despite Governor Brian Kemp lifting shelter-in-place orders and reopening some nonessential businesses.
Source: CNN https://www.cnn.com/videos/us/2020/04/24/atlanta-mayor-keisha-lance-bottoms-reopening-georgia-newday-vpx.cnn

Georgia Governor Brian Kemp should be removed, by any means necessary, for malfeasance while in office. Georgia desperately needs a sane leader who cares more about We The People than one who obviously desires crap shooting  for dollars.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trump Will Kill US All

SNL’s Hillary Clinton Goes Full ‘Love Actually’ on Elector: Trump ‘Will Kill Us All’

By Kevin Fallon

https://www.thedailybeast.com/snls-hillary-clinton-goes-full-love-actually-on-elector-trump-will-kill-us-all

TRUMP PUSHES BIG RE-OPEN*

Trump gives governors 3-phase plan to reopen economy

By ZEKE MILLER, ALAN SUDERMAN and KEVIN FREKING

https://apnews.com/420a38ec14101eab70e07be367ee6422

Despite Lags in Testing, Trump Calls to ‘Liberate’ States

President Trump tweeted “LIBERATE MICHIGAN!” and “LIBERATE MINNESOTA!” Both have been targets of far-right protests of social distancing.

Anguished Young Woman

The decision was made to publish the entire article because the obviously anguished young woman is from the greater metropolitan Atlanta area and was published in the venerable New York Times.

Surviving Coronavirus as a Broke College Student

We need better options. Our rent is due April 1.

By Sydney Goins

Ms. Goins is a senior English major at the University of Georgia.

March 30, 2020

SUWANEE, Ga. — College was supposed to be my ticket to financial security. My parents were the first ones to go to college in their family. My grandpa said to my mom, “You need to go to college, so you don’t have to depend on a man for money.” This same mentality was passed on to me as well.

I had enough money to last until May— $1,625 to be exact — until the coronavirus ruined my finances.

My mom works in human resources. My dad is a project manager for a mattress company. I worked part time at the university’s most popular dining hall and lived in a cramped house with three other students. I don’t have a car. I either walked or biked a mile to attend class. I have student debt and started paying the accrued interest last month.

I was making it work until the coronavirus shut down my college town. At first, spring break was extended by two weeks with the assumption that campus would open again in late March, but a few hours after that email, all 26 colleges in the University System of Georgia canceled in-person classes and closed integral parts of campus.

UGA professors are currently remodeling their courses and revising their syllabuses for online learning. Students were advised to not return to the campus at Athens from their vacations or hometowns. Our May graduation ceremony was even canceled without any hope of rescheduling it for a future date.

After this news, one of my housemates drove for 12 hours to her mom’s house in Chicago. Another gave me a few rolls of toilet paper and left with her boyfriend for a neighboring county.

The dining hall I worked at remained open. UGA allowed to-go meals for those still living in their dorms without a place to go. Student workers who didn’t leave for the break could call in and ask to work their usual shifts, but on many occasions, the staff wouldn’t answer the phone.

So far, an athletics trainer and honors student have tested positive for the coronavirus. They were last on campus on March 6. As of Tuesday, one person has died in the Athens hospital. Some students are asking for the semester to end with a pass-fail grading scale. This would help those without access to Wi-Fi or a distraction-free environment. I didn’t even have a personal laptop to use until a few weeks ago. It broke in November and I couldn’t afford to fix it until recently.

What if I had to do intensive schoolwork on a lagging smartphone? For the last three years, I have relied on the libraries and other on-campus resources like interlibrary loans and the bus system in order to complete my coursework. Now, the university is refunding us around $128 for services that we may need for a semester online.

After three years as an undergrad, I will graduate in May. I had applied to two highly selective creative writing programs with the ambitious hopes of acceptance. Brown University sent me an email to check the portal, and Iowa Writers Workshop sent me a letter through the mail. Both were rejections.

I pivoted my plans. I thought I could find another restaurant job in Athens or hopefully an internship during the summer until I could apply to grad school again. Those odds are not in my favor anymore. Many restaurants here have closed indefinitely or only offer takeout options. They are not hiring anytime soon.

A local coffee shop and bar, Hendershots, has started a GoFundMe for their out-of-work employees with around $10,000 raised so far. Just the Tip: Athens Virtual Tip Jar also allows regular customers to send their favorite servers tip money they would normally leave on a night out. Many service industry workers my age have added their names to this list.

Not all college students are gallivanting across the white sand beaches of Florida without a care in the world. This pandemic affects young people too. Our future depends on the efforts of the national and state governments. Coronavirus testing is extremely limited in Georgia. For its 10.52 million residents, only 100-200 state tests are available each day.

“The state does not have the capacity to test those with mild symptoms,” said Dr. Kathleen Toomey, commissioner of the Georgia Department of Public Health, in a news conference call last week.

On Thursday night, Athens-Clarke County unanimously passed an ordinance that enforces social distancing and a “shelter in place” rule, eliminating nonessential travel and large gatherings. Over 60 percent of the city’s population — the homeless, elderly, and those with pre-existing conditions — are susceptible to Covid-19.

Local grocery stores had already limited their hours and lacked essential food items like beans, rice and paper goods, showcasing barren shelves. I had a panic attack, looking at items marked “out-of-stock” on the Instacart app and watching peers post photos online. I asked my mom if I could come home.

We drove through the empty Atlanta highway, away from my struggling college town. Now, I am back in Suwanee with dwindling savings, still having to pay rent until the end of my lease in July. I won’t have an income to pay it.

For college students like me, the current solutions are: File for unemployment! Find a job at Kroger or Aldi at the detriment of your physical health! Call your potentially toxic parents! Tax refund! Personal loan! Sell your belongings!

These options are not good enough. College was supposed to give us hope for our financial future, not place us back in our parents’ houses without jobs.

Mortgage and rent payments must be suspended, so further debt and illness can be avoided, especially for restaurant servers, broke college students and those in the working class who cannot afford to escape financial crises. Our rent is due April 1.

Feedback From Mulfish

I received an email in response to the previous post from my friend Michael Mulford, a Republican, tonight. If you are wondering how I could possibly have a friend who is a Republican, the answer is that my Mother was a Republican, “God bless her heart”, as we say here down South. When we would talk politics my father would say, “Argue, argue, argue, that’s all you two do.” Mother responded with, “We’re not arguing, Ronald. We are having a heated discussion!”

Michael Mulford
To:Michael Bacon

Sat, Mar 21 at 9:22 PM

“Actually, four Senators are known to have engaged in this behavior, not just these two. One of them has called for an ethics investigation into their actions. One of the four is a Democrat.

I’ve heard that members of Congress are exempt from the insider trading legislation (I don’t know if that is true) and that the holdings are in blind trusts. But I’ve also heard that the husbands do have some measure of control over those trusts.

By any account, this smells and ought to be thoroughly investigated. And if the GOP wants to hold the GA Senate seat, they would do well to nominate someone else.”

Thought I would share the answer with you. Please read the entire article as this is only an excerpt taken from the article:

Update: Several readers have asked about the other senators who sold stock during the same period, including Dianne Feinstein (a California Democrat), James Inhofe (an Oklahoma Republican) and Ron Johnson (a Wisconsin Republican). But none of their trades look particularly suspicious.

Feinstein has said that she did not attend the Jan. 24 briefing; her stock was in a blind trust, which means she didn’t make the decision to sell; and the transaction lost her money, because the trust was selling shares of a biotechnology stock, the value of which has since risen. Inhofe’s transactions were part of a systematic selling of stocks that he started after he became chairman of the Armed Services Committee. Johnson sold stock in his family’s plastic business, as part of a process that has been occurring for months; his sale also occurred well after stock market began falling.

Jeff Blehar of National Review has a helpful summary on Twitter, in which he argues Burr’s transactions are the worst.

Loeffler, who is extremely wealthy and married to the chairman of the New York Stock Exchange, frequently sells stock and has said “multiple third-party advisors” — not her or her husband — made the decision to sell shares in January and in February.

(I must interject here to print something the Mulfish must have missed in the previous post:

“Ms. Loeffler, who also sits on the Health Committee, is in a similarly sticky situation. On the very day of the committee’s coronavirus briefing, she began her own stock sell-off, as originally reported by The Daily Beast. Over the next three weeks, she shed between $1,275,000 and $3.1 million worth of stock, much of it jointly owned with her husband, who is the chairman of the New York Stock Exchange. Of Ms. Loeffler’s 29 transactions, 27 were sales. One of her two purchases was of a technology company that provides teleworking software. That stock has appreciated in recent weeks, as so many companies have ordered employees to work from home.”

Only a Republican would believe those trading stocks for the Loeffler’s “just happened” to make trades of this nature without being tipped off. If you do believe the woman then please get in touch with me IMMEDIATELY because I have a great deal for you on some swamp land in Florida.)

 

The notion that Feinstein or Johnson did something unethical, Belhar wrote, is “flat wrong.” Don Moynihan of Georgetown University agrees.

Burr’s response on Friday morning was not strong. He said that he relied on only “public news reports” about the crisis, like CNBC’s reporting from Asia, a claim that’s impossible to verify. He also said he had asked the Senate Ethics Committee to open “a complete review.”

For more …

Tucker Carlson, Fox News:

[Burr] had inside information about what could happen to our country, which is now happening, but he didn’t warn the public. He didn’t give a prime-time address. He didn’t go on television to sound the alarm. He didn’t even disavow an op-ed he’d written just 10 days before claiming America was ‘better prepared than ever’ for coronavirus. He didn’t do any of those things. Instead, what did he do? He dumped his shares in hotel stocks so he wouldn’t lose money, and then he stayed silent. Now maybe there’s an honest explanation for what he did. If there is, he should share it with the rest of us immediately. Otherwise, he must resign from the Senate …

Molly Knight: “Richard Burr should not hold government office by Monday. He needs to resign today.”

David French, The Dispatch: “The potential insider trading is dreadful and possibly criminal, but what could elevate this to a historic scandal is the idea that senators may have known enough to be alarmed for themselves yet still projected rosy scenarios to the public AND failed to make sure we were ready.”

David Frum of The Atlantic wants to know who else may have sold stock: “What did the Trump family sell, and when did they sell it?”

The Times editorial board argued in December that “members of Congress should not be allowed to buy and sell stocks, or to serve on corporate boards.”

In 2012, Robert Reich notes, Burr was one of only a small number of members to vote against a law that barred them for trading on inside information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cheating Is A Dangerous Game

Think Cheating in Baseball Is Bad? Try Chess

Smartphones, buzzers, even yogurt — chess has nearly seen it all in both live and online tournaments. And just as in baseball, technology only makes it harder to root out.

By

March 15, 2020

Until the sports world ground to a halt last week over the coronavirus outbreak, perhaps the biggest issue looming over professional sports in the United States was the Houston Astros’ cheating scandal. The revelations of their scheme led Major League Baseball’s commissioner, Rob Manfred, to deliver a stern warning to all 30 club owners that there was a “culture of cheating” in the game.

But baseball’s malfeasance — sign-stealing or otherwise — has nothing on chess. At prestigious live tournaments and among thousands of others playing daily online, cheating is a scourge.

Whether it’s a secret buzzer planted in a shoe, a smartphone smuggled into the bathroom, a particular flavor of yogurt delivered at a key moment — or just online players using computerized chess programs — chess has perhaps more cheating than any other game in the world.

“Of course it is a problem,” said Leinier Domínguez, the Cuban-born player currently ranked No. 1 in the United States. “Because with all the advances in technology, it’s always a possibility. People have more chances and opportunities to do this sort of thing.”

112 (pronounced “one-twelve”) are an American R&B quartet from Atlanta, Georgia. Formerly artists on Bad Boy Records, the group signed to the Def Soul roster in 2002. They had great success in the late 1990s and early 2000s (decade) with hits such as “Only You”, “Anywhere” and the Grammy nominated single, “Peaches and Cream”. The group most notably won a Grammy in 1997 for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group, for featuring in the song “I’ll Be Missing You” with Sean Combs and Faith Evans.
https://www.lyrics.com/artist/112/182756

Dangerous Games
112

Your hands full of cards parallel to mine
With your poker face on
Forcing me to draw four (oh ah)
I took, I took, three smarter steps
Seems as if I won this round
So I scream it connect four
But, you say I’m swinging along

I don’t wanna play this game of chess anymore
‘Cause everyone knows when your queen is gone you don’t last long (yeah)
So I keep myself in checkmate love

This is a dangerous game of love
Accusing you of cheating on us baby
Cheating on love baby
And I know that is so dangerous just because I do the same baby
Cheating on love baby
Dangerous games, ah baby
Dangerous games

Ooh love
Every night you and I live a lie lying in bed baby
Take a lie to the head playing Russian roulette baby (roulette baby)
How can I guarantee we’ll survive playing with fire, huh
Used to being dangerous, dangerous

I don’t wanna play this game of chess anymore
‘Cause everyone knows when your queen is gone you don’t last long
So I keep myself in checkmate love

This is a dangerous game of love
Accusing you of cheating on us baby
Cheating on love baby
And I know that is so dangerous just because I do the same baby
Cheating on love baby
Dangerous games, ah baby
Dangerous games

Ooh love
And they say that all is fair
When it comes to love and war
I don’t wanna play the game no more
Tell me what you are fighting for
We have too much to lose
If we continue keeping score

This is a dangerous game of love (is a dangerous game)
Accusing you of cheating on us baby (cheating on us baby)
Cheating on love baby (cheating on love baby)
And I know that is so dangerous just because I do the same baby
Cheating on love baby
Dangerous games
https://www.lyrics.com/lyric/34521740/112/Dangerous+Games