The Evil Empire Battles Ukraine

I usually do not comment on a knock-out type tournament, especially one so-called a “world championship,” but the final match between a Russian and a Ukrainian with the situation, Russian encroachments and troops and tanks one the border, is the closest thing the chess world has seen to the situation when American Bobby Fischer challenged the Russian Boris Spassky for the World Championship in 1972 during the Cold War. GM Kevin Spraggett wrote about Natalia Pogonina and Mariya Muzychuk, “…who I understand are friends.” (https://kevinspraggettonchess.wordpress.com/2015/03/31/pogonina-unstoppable/) That friendship may last no matter which player wins the match, but it will not last when the real war with weapons of destruction begins.

Make no mistake, if the insane Rootin’ Tootin’ Pootin’ does not back down, there will be war. The West has no choice but to call Putin’s bluff. “Let us not forget that Ukraine has been guaranteed, in 1994, the protection of its territorial integrity by the United States. Ukraine gave up nukes! Very few people remember it was the third-largest nuclear arsenal in the world. [Not honouring the gurantee] is very bad, not only for the United States – Bill Clinton’s signature was there. Ukraine gave up twelve hundred nuclear warheads, more than England, France and China combined, in exchange for guarantees from America and Great Britain. This will have implications way beyond Ukraine’s borders, because it destroys the credibility of the White House, it destroys the credibility of the free world, and it sends a message, let’s say to Iran, that you need nukes to protect your borders. Same can apply to Japan, South Korea, countries that are facing a rising threat from China. It will be a totally different world unless we follow the promises written on paper and signed by the leaders of the free world.” -Garry Kasparov
(http://en.chessbase.com/post/kasparov-on-putin-ukrainian-nukes-nemtsov)

The lead story in the magazine Modern War #16, March-April 2015, is Visegrad: The Coming War in Eastern Europe, by David March. (http://modernwarmagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/MW16-v5F-TOC.pdf)
It is also possible to play a board game before the real war begins. (http://shop.decisiongames.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCode=VASS19)

I have followed the games of the Muzychuk sisters because they play the Leningrad Dutch, most of which I have played over in recent years, so I would be predisposed to pulling for Mariya in this prelude to war. After reading the article, and Putin as Warlord, by Gilberto Villahermosa, in the same magazine, I believe Russia will lose World War III, just as I expect the Russian, Pogonina, to be stopped and lose the match with the Ukrainian, Mariya Muzychuk.

rd4-04

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Playing With The Polar Bear

An article on the Chessdom website published March 9, 2015, GM Danielsen publishes The Polar Bear System, caught my eye. It begins, “The famous Grandmaster from Iceland – Henrik Danielsen – has published his first edition of The Polar Bear System. GM Danielsen shared, “I have spent 15 years developing the Polar Bear system. Indeed I have turned every stone in the system and lost many games in doing so. Since there is no theory of importance I had to work hard. I read everything about the Dutch defense and used the ideas with reversed colors. So the theory in the book is mainly created with my own games and analysis.”

“The Polar Bear System starts with 1.f4 (the Bird opening) and then fianchetto of the kings, bishop as a mirror image of the Leningrad Dutch.” (http://www.chessdom.com/gm-danielsen-publishes-the-polar-bear-system/)

I have played this system without knowing it was called “The Polar Bear System.” I cannot help but wonder if the chess players down under, in Australia, have developed a Koala Bear System…

I clicked on “See the official website of The Polar Bear System” and saw this, a continuation from above, “I had to select the cream. And turn the cream into a repertoire book. Omitting lines in which I do not believe.

“Every game and every move has been checked by the chess programs Stockfish and Fritz 13. It will not be easy for the reader to find a tactical mistake in the text. It is on purpose I have chosen to comment the games with short text. Boiling the material down and letting the games speak for themselves. The repertoire is for serious club players but also professionals can get inspired.” (http://www.polarbearsystem.com/about-pbs.html)

At this point the Polar had me in a Bear hug, so I clicked on where it says, “But the book hear!” I landed in the Amazon, going from the grip of a Polar Bear into that of a Gorilla. For sixteen inflated US digits I could have purchased the “book” with one more click. Unfortunately for me the “book” only comes in digits, and I would need something named a “Kindle” to read those digits. Finding nothing about a real book, I decided to click on “contact” and sent GM Danielsen an email, asking if he had any plans for a book we e-reader challenged people could purchase. This was his reply: “On Tuesday, March 10, 2015 3:35 PM, The Polarbear System gmhenrikdanielsen wrote:

Hello Michael

thank you for your e-mail, I can hopefully publish the book later. I would like that to happen.
All the best of luck to you also.

Regards
GM Henrik Danielsen”

Oh well…Unless and until a book is published I will have to content myself with the video included in the Chessdom article and others I have located, such as this one on youtube: (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jXq4–F816I&list=PL0Pymw6KEu42sv0wo-pMyrBDzpcYle3Ki), and this one, Blitz Chess #1 with Live Comments – Bird Opening vs GM Hikaru Nakamura (b loss). (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jXq4–F816I&list=PL0Pymw6KEu42sv0wo-pMyrBDzpcYle3Ki)

And here is an article found on the USCF website, GM Joel on the Polar Bear, By GM Joel Benjamin, March 18, 2009. (http://www.uschess.org/content/view/9203/341/)

Leningrad Dutch by Vladimir Malaniuk

It should be obvious to anyone who reads this blog that I love the Leningrad Dutch. The GM who has spent most of his career playing the defense, Vladimir Malaniuk, has written a book on it, and it has been published in Europe, and is not yet for sale in the US. For that reason I decided to email the publisher, Chess Stars, to learn why it is not yet sold here in the states.
Subject: Re: Leningrad Dutch
From: Semko Semkov
Date: Tue, August 5, 2014 01:51
To: Michael
I sent the book long ago to our distributor. I will ask him to answer you.
Hi,
Our US distributor is Books From Europe
I asked him to answer you, but I still have no reply from them.
Semko Semkov
Books From Europe
To Mesemkov@chess-stars.com
Aug 5
Dear Michael,
Leningrad Dutch by GM Malaniuk is available on our web-site (as most chess titles from the wide range of publishers).
Please follow the link:
http://chessbooksfromeurope.com//bookstore/product_info.php?products_id=1817
We also have internet stores on the E-bay:
http://stores.ebay.com/Books-from-Europe?_rdc=1
and Amazon:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/aag/main/ref=olp_merch_name_5?ie=UTF8&asin=1857449886&isAmazonFulfilled=0&seller=A1NNTWFA7GO9OY
Best Regards,
Emanuel & Irena Rasin ( Books from Europe )
Visit our website:
http://www.chessbooksfromeurope.com
Fax / Toll Free 1-866-328-1523

Aug 7
Semko Semkov
Michael,
Thanks a lot for letting me know that. We only send books to our distributor and we do not devise his trading policy. Before Books from Europe, we dealt with Hannon Russel from Chess Cafe. He sold less so we are relatively happy with the guy from Books from Europe.
Perhaps the main problem in our case is the expensive delivery from Europe (air cargo) and the high cost of books before production. Making a hardcover is actually cheap (1$), we do not offer them to reduce weight and postal expenses. Our authors are top Grandmasters and we publish only high quality (having in mind chess content) books. It takes a year to prepare one. Respectively their fees are higher than an author of “a really nice hardback McFarland book”. At the same time, our target audience is farly limited to strong club players and professionals. If the reader does not grasp the difference between mass production and our books, he is probably right not to buy them. They are clearly not meant for him.
_______________
We are constantly trying to make our product more affordable. That’s why we devised the electronic format Forwardchess (iOS – https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/forwardchess/id543005909?mt=8), Android (https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.forwardchess) . It is much more functional than any paper book since all the moves are displayed on a big board while retaining their print layout. One can also analyze with Stockfish.
The prices are the same or less (the top one is $20) than any competitor’s book. I strongly recommend Forward chess to any chess fan. In my opinion, this is the future of chess books.
To semkov@chess-stars.com
Aug 8
You are welcome, Semko. I completely understand everything you have written, having worked at the Oxford bookstore in the late 70’s-early 80’s I do understand some things about the business of books. In my case it is that I am old(er) and have less money, much of which does go to books! Although New in Chess magazine is considered expensive, I enjoy it immensely and somehow manage to read every issue, whether or not I have a subscription.
I would like to use your comments in a post about the Malaniuk book and the state of the book business. I would, therefore, like to ask you if that is OK? Also, what is the retail price of the book? The folks at Chess Cafe show this:
7/12 The Leningrad Dutch (25% preorder discount!)
When one clicks on, this is shown:
Price $37.95
Sale Price $28.46
Availability Back Ordered
Is this the true retail price? Or is it $31.95?

Semko Semkov
Aug 8
Michael,
Thanks a lot for letting me know that. We only send books to our distributor and we do not devise his trading policy. Before Books from Europe, we dealt with Hannon Russel from Chess Cafe. He sold less so we are relatively happy with the guy from Books from Europe.
Perhaps the main problem in our case is the expensive delivery from Europe (air cargo) and the high cost of books before production. Making a hardcover is actually cheap (1$), we do not offer them to reduce weight and postal expenses. Our authors are top Grandmasters and we publish only high quality (having in mind chess content) books. It takes a year to prepare one. Respectively their fees are higher than an author of “a really nice hardback McFarland book”. At the same time, our target audience is farly limited to strong club players and professionals. If the reader does not grasp the difference between mass production and our books, he is probably right not to buy them. They are clearly not meant for him.
_______________
We are constantly trying to make our product more affordable. That’s why we devised the electronic format Forwardchess (iOS – https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/forwardchess/id543005909?mt=8), Android (https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.forwardchess) . It is much more functional than any paper book since all the moves are displayed on a big board while retaining their print layout. One can also analyze with Stockfish.
The prices are the same or less (the top one is $20) than any competitor’s book. I strongly recommend Forwardchess to any chess fan. In my opinion, this is the future of chess books.
On Friday, August 8, 2014 2:31 PM, Semko Semkov wrote:
I do not know the retail price – we never put one on the cover.
Our wholesale price is $15 (including air cargo to the US). American retailers are used to at least double it. As far as I know, that’s common practice.
So there it is, the retail cost of the book is $15. Chess Cafe shows the price of the book as $37.95, on “sale” for $32.27. Although they showed it as ‘Back Ordered’ a few days ago, it is not listed as ‘in stock.’ Amazon has it listed for $31.95, plus $3.99 shipping. This is from the folks at Books From Europe. I cannot wait to get my hands on this book. Unfortunately, circumstances dictate that I must wait on a price drop.

The Beatles Paperback Writer 2009 Stereo Remaster)

DC Invaded By Dutch!

In addition to the Leningrad Dutch Kazim Gulamali played in round four this game was also played:
Yury Shulman (2568) – Viktor Laznicka (2679)
World Open 2014, rd. 4
1.c4 f5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.g3 g6 4.b3 Bg7 5.Bb2 d6 6.d4 O-O 7.Bg2 c6 8.O-O Na6 9.Nbd2 e5 10.dxe5 Nd7 11.Ba3 Nxe5 12.Nxe5 Bxe5 13.Qc2 Bxa1 14.Rxa1 Qe7 15.Rd1 Be6 16.Bb2 h6 17.Qc3 Kh7 18.b4 Rad8 19.Nf3 c5 20.a3 d5 21.cxd5 Bxd5 22.b5 Nc7 23.Qa5 Be4 24.Rc1 Ne6 25.Qxa7 Ra8 26.Qb6 Rfd8 27.Be5 Rd5 28.Bf4 g5 29.Be3 Rd6 30.Bxc5 Nxc5 31.Qxc5 Rd1+ 32.Bf1 Qxc5 33.Rxc5 Rxa3 0-1

There was a dearth of games on Monroi both during and after the fifth round games, and the CCA page only shows four games, so I have no idea how often the Dutch Defence was unsheathed, but today’s sixth round saw THREE Dutch Defense games on the top boards. The 2014 World Open has seen a virtual cornucopia of f5! With two wins and three draws thus far, I would have to say the Dutch is more than holding its own!

Timur Gareyev (2640) – Andrey Gorovets (2446)
World Open 2014, rd. 6
1.d4 f5 2.Nc3 d5 3.Bf4 e6 4.e3 a6 5.Nf3 Nf6 6.Bd3 c5 7.dxc5 Bxc5 8.O-O Nc6 9.Ne2 Qe7 (9…Nb4 10. a3 Nxd3 11. cxd3 Bd7 12. Rc1 Rc8 13. Qd2 O-O 14. Rxc5 Rxc5 15. Bd6 Rc8 16. Bxf8 Qxf8 17. Rc1 b6 18. Ne5 Rxc1+ 19. Qxc1 Qc8 20. Qxc8+ Bxc8 21. Nd4 a5 22. f4 Kf8 23. Kf2 Ke7 24. h3 Nd7 25. Ndf3 Nc5 26. Ke1 Bd7 27. Kd2 Be8 28. b4 axb4 29. axb4 Nb7 30. g4 fxg4 31. hxg4 Nd6 32. Nd4 h6 33. Ke2 Kf6 34. Ndf3 g5 35. fxg5+ hxg5 36. Kd2 Ba4 37. Ke2 Bb5 1/2-1/2, Varuzhan Akobian – Gata Kamsky, 2014 US Championship) 10.Ned4 O-O 11.c4 Bd7 12.a3 Bd6 13.Bg3 Bxg3 14.hxg3 Kh8 15.cxd5 Nxd5 16.e4 Nxd4 17.Nxd4 Qf6 18.Bc2 fxe4 19.Bxe4 Rad8 20.Bxd5 Bc8 21.Be4 Rxd4 22.Qc2 g6 23.Rad1 e5 24.Rfe1 Qd6 25.Rxd4 exd4 26.Bd3 Bd7 27.Qd2 Kg7 28.Qg5 Re8 1/2-1/2

Denys Shmelov (2393) – Alex Shimanov (2644)
World Open 2014, rd. 6
1.d4 f5 2.c4 Nf6 3.g3 g6 4.Bg2 Bg7 5.Nc3 d6 6.d5 c6 7.Nh3 e5 8.dxe6 Bxe6 9.Qb3 Qe7 10.Ng5 Bc8 11.O-O h6 (11…Na6 12. Rd1 Nd7 13. Qc2 O-O 14. Nf3 Ne5 15. b3 Nc5 16. Nxe5 Bxe5 17. Bh6 Re8 18. Qd2 Be6 19. Rac1 a5 20. Bg5 Qf8 21. Be3 Rad8 22. Bd4 f4 23. Qb2 Bf5 24. Qa3 Ra8 25. Bf3 h5 26. Na4 Ne6 27. Bxe5 dxe5 28. Qxf8+ Nxf8 29. gxf4 exf4 30. Nc5 Rab8 31. a3 Re7 32. Rd4 g5 33. Bxh5 b6 34. Nd3 Ne6 35. Rd6 Rd8 36. Rxd8+ Nxd8 37. c5 b5 38. b4 axb4 39. Nxb4 g4 40. Rd1 Rd7 41. Rxd7 Bxd7 42. Nd3 Nb7 43. Nxf4 Nxc5 44. Ng6 Kg7 45. Ne5 Kf6 46. Nxd7+ Nxd7 47. Bxg4 Ne5 48. Bf3 Ke6 49. h4 c5 50. Kf1 Nc4 51. h5 Nxa3 52. Bd5+ Kf6 53. e4 c4 54. h6 Kg6 55. e5 c3 56. Ke2 b4 57. e6 Nb5 58. e7 Nd6 59. Bc6 Kxh6 60. e8=Q Nxe8 61. Bxe8 Kg5 62. Ba4 Kf4 63. Bc2 Ke5 64. Ke3 Kd5 65. Bb3+ Ke5 66. f4+ 1-0, Yuri Drozdovskij (2509) – Friso Nijboer (2571), Cappelle la Grande, 2006) 12.Nf3 Na6 13.Rd1 Nc5 14.Qc2 O-O 15.Rb1 a5 16.Bf4 Rd8 17.Na4 Nxa4 18.Qxa4 Be6 19.Nd4 Bf7 20.Qc2 d5 21.c5 Ne4 22.Bxe4 Qxe4 23.Qc3 g5 24.Bd6 Re8 25.Rbc1 Bg6 26.Rd2 f4 27.Rf1 Kh7 28.gxf4 gxf4 29.f3 Qe3 30.Qxe3 fxe3 31.Rdd1 a4 32.Kh1 Rg8 33.Rg1 Bf6 34.Bf4 a3 35.b3 Rae8 36.Bd6 h5 37.Bg3 Be7 38.Rc1 Bf6 39.Rcd1 Bd8 40.Be1 Bc7 41.Bg3 Ba5 42.Be1 Bc7 43.Bg3 Bd8 44.Be1 Rgf8 45.Bg3 Rf7 46.Rc1 Ba5 47.Be1 Bxe1 48.Rgxe1 Rf4 49.Red1 Bf5 50.Nxf5 Rxf5 51.Rd4 Kg6 52.Rb4 Re7 53.Ra4 Kf6 54.Rxa3 d4 55.b4 Ke5 56.Rd3 Rg7 57.Rcd1 Rf4 58.h3 Rg8 59.a3 h4 60.Kh2 Rg3 61.Re1 Rf7 62.Red1 Rfg7 63.Rxd4 Rg2 64.Kh1 Rxe2 65.Re4 Kf5 66.Rd8 Re1 67.Kh2 Re2 68.Kh1 Rg3 69.Rf8 Kg5 70.Rg8 Kf6 71.Rge8 Rxh3 72.Kg1 Rg3 73.Kh1 Rh3 74.Kg1 Re1 75.Kg2 Rhh1 76.R8e6 1/2-1/2

The following game features 11…Nbd7 in lieu of 11…h6 or Na6 as above.

Oms Pallisse, Josep (2498) – Menvielle Laccourreye, Augusto (2254)
74th ch-ESP Absoluto 2009

1. d4 f5 2. c4 Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 4. g3 Bg7 5. Bg2 d6 6. d5 c6 7. Nh3 e5 8. dxe6 Bxe6 9. Qb3 Qe7 10. Ng5 Bc8 11. O-O Nbd7 12. Rd1 h6 13. Nf3 Nc5 14. Qc2 Be6 15. b3 O-O 16. Bb2 Rad8 17. Nd4 Bf7 18. e3 Nce4 19. Rac1 Rfe8 20. Re1 d5 21. cxd5 Bxd5 22. Nxd5 cxd5 23. f3 Ng5 24. Qc5 Qxc5 25. Rxc5 Ne6 26. Nxe6 Rxe6 27. Bd4 Ne8 28. Bxg7 Kxg7 29. Kf2 Rd7 30. Rec1 d4 31. exd4 Rxd4 32. R1c2 Red6 33. Bf1 Rd2+ 34. Ke3 Rxc2 35. Rxc2 Kf6 36. Rc8 Re6+ 37. Kd4 Nd6 38. Rc1 f4 39. g4 Nf7 40. Bc4 Rd6+ 41. Ke4 Rc6 42. Rc2 g5 43. Bd3 Re6+ 44. Kd4 Rd6+ 45. Kc3 Rc6+ 46. Kb4 Rb6+ 47. Ka5 Rd6 48. Be4 Rd7 49. Kb4 Rd4+ 50. Kc3 Rd7 51. Re2 Ne5 52. Rd2 Rxd2 53. Kxd2 Ke6 54. Kc3 b6 55. Kd4 Kd6 56. Ba8 Ke6 57. Bb7 Ng6 58. b4 Nh4 59. Be4 Ng2 60. a4 Ne3 61. Bd3 Kd6 62. Be4 a5 63. bxa5 bxa5 64. Bd3 Nd1 65. Bb5 Ne3 66. Ke4 Ke6 67. Bd3 Kd6 68. h4 gxh4 69. Kxf4 Nd5+ 70. Ke4 Nc3+ 71. Kd4 h3 72. Bf1 h2 73. Bg2 Nxa4 74. f4 Nc5 75. f5 Nd7 76. Ke3 a4 77. Kd4 Nf6 0-1

Aleksandr Lenderman (2600) – Viktor Laznicka (2679)
World Open 2014, rd. 6
1.c4 f5 2.d4 Nf6 3.Nc3 d6 4.Nf3 g6 5.Bf4 Bg7 6.e3 Nbd7 7.Qb3 c6 (Nh5 8. Ng5 Nf8 9. c5 h6 10. Qf7+ Kd7 11. cxd6 hxg5 12. dxc7 1-0, Hans Hermesmann (2300) – Bernhard Juergens (2066) Hamburg Ani Cup 2004) 8.c5 d5 9.h3 Ne4 10.Be2 e5 11.Bh2 O-O 12.Rc1 Qe7 13.Rc2 exd4 14.exd4 Ng5 15.O-O f4 16.Nxd5 Nxf3 17.Bxf3 cxd5 18.Re2 Qh4 19.Qxd5 Kh8 20.Qd6 g5 21.Re7 Nf6 22.Bxb7 Bxb7 23.Rxb7 Rad8 24.Qe7 Qh6 25.c6 Nd5 26.Qc5 Qe6 27.Qxa7 Rg8 28.Qc5 g4 29.c7 Rc8 30.hxg4 Bf8 31.Qc2 Rxg4 32.Rb8 Rg7 33.Rxc8 Qxc8 34.Qe4 Rd7 35.Qf5 Nxc7 36.Bxf4 Nd5 37.Be5 Bg7 38.Re1 Qd8 39.Re4 Ne7 40.Bxg7 Kxg7 41.Qe5 Kg8 42.Qe6 Kg7 43.Qe5 Kg8 44.Qe6 Kg7 45.Qe5 1/2-1/2

Paul Keres showed the way to play Nbd7 back before my day!

Tamm, P. – Keres, Paul
A81 EST training 1935
1. Nf3 f5 2. d4 Nf6 3. g3 d6 4. Bg2 Nbd7 5. Ng5 Nb6 6. O-O g6 7. Re1 Bg7 8. c3 O-O 9. e4 fxe4 10. Nxe4 Nxe4 11. Bxe4 e5 12. dxe5 Bxe5 13. Bh6 Bg7 14. Bxg7 Kxg7 15. Qd4+ Qf6 16. Qxf6+ Kxf6 17. Nd2 c6 18. Bg2 d5 19. f4 Na4 20. c4 Be6 21. b3 Nc5 22. cxd5 Bxd5 23. Ne4+ Bxe4 24. Bxe4 Rad8 25. Rac1 Nxe4 26. Rxe4 Rd2 27. a4 Rfd8 28. Rce1 Rb2 29. Re6+ Kg7 30. Re7+ Kh6 31. R1e2 Rxe2 32. Rxe2 Rd1+ 33. Kg2 Rb1 34. Re3 Rb2+ 35. Kh3 b6 36. g4 Kg7 37. Kg3 c5 38. h3 Kf6 39. g5+ Kf7 40. Kf3 Rc2 41. Kg4 c4 42. bxc4 Rxc4 43. Ra3 Ke6 44. h4 Kd6 45. Ra1 Kc5 46. h5 gxh5+ 47. Kf5 h4 48. Rh1 Rxa4 49. Rxh4 Ra1 50. Rxh7 b5 51. g6 b4 52. g7 Rg1 53. Kf6 b3 54. Rh5+ Kc6 55. Rg5 Rxg5 56. fxg5 b2 57. g8=Q b1=Q 58. Qc8+ Kd6 59. Qe6+ Kc7 60. Qe7+ Kb6 1/2-1/2

Kazim Scores with the Leningrad Dutch!

After losses to GM Yury Shulman (2568) and IM Lev Milman (2437), with a win vs unrated Siddharth Barot, who upset Justin Burgess (2160) the previous round, sandwiched in between, Kazim Gulamali sat down to begin the fourth round of the 42nd World Open, being held at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City, located at 2799 Jefferson Davis Highway in Arlington, Virginia, behind the Black pieces vs IM Justin Sarkar (2414). In reply to his the opening move of 1 d4 Kazim played 1…f5! It turned into one of the main Leningrad Dutch variations.
Kazim was known as the “Little Grandmaster” at the House of Pain. He cut his chess teeth at the House. It was thrilling to watch the game today because I LOVE the Leningrad Dutch! I was also elated to learn the Master of the Leningrad Dutch, none other than GM Vladimir Malaniuk, has written a book entitled, “The Leningrad Dutch: An Active Repertoire Against 1.d4, 1.c4, 1.Nf3” published by Chess Stars, and I cannot wait to get my hands on it. Unfortunately, although it was supposedly published June 9, I cannot find it for sale. I checked with the Gorilla only to find, “Out of Print-Limited Availability.” If anyone knows how to locate a copy, please let me know!
Justin Sarkar (2414)vs Kazim Gulamali (2300)
1.d4 f5 2.c4 Nf6 3.Nc3 g6 4.g3 Bg7 5.Bg2 O-O 6.Nf3 d6 7.O-O Nc6 8.d5 Ne5 9.Nxe5 dxe5 10.Qb3 Kh8 11.c5 e4 12.Rd1 b6 13.Bf4 bxc5 14.Qa3 c4 15.Qc5 Ne8 16.Qxc4 a5 17.Rac1 Nd6 18.Qc5 Bd7 19.Rc2 Qb8 20.Be3 Rc8 21.Bd4 Qb4 22.Bxg7 Kxg7 23.Qd4 Qxd4 24.Rxd4 c5 25.dxc6 Bxc6 26.Bf1 Rab8 27.e3 Nf7 28.Ba6 Rd8 29.Ne2 Bd5 30.Ra4 Ng5 31.Kf1 Nf3 32.Nd4 Nxh2 33.Ke2 e5 34.Nb5 Nf3 35.Nc7 Bf7 36.Rxa5 Rb6 37.g4 Rbd6 38.gxf5 Rd1 39.Ne6 Kh6 0-1

Here are some other games with this variation I found on the Chessbase database and at 365chess.com:

Monnard, Laurent (2285)- Spraggett, Kevin (2495) 0-1
A89 Andorra op 9th 1991
1. c4 f5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. g3 g6 4. Bg2 Bg7 5. O-O O-O 6. d4 d6 7. Nc3 Nc6 8. d5 Ne5 9. Qb3 Kh8 10. Nxe5 dxe5 11. c5 h6 12. a4 a6 13. a5 g5 14. c6 bxc6 15. dxc6 e4 16. Rd1 Qe8 17. Qc4 Ng4 18. Nd5 Rb8 19. Nxc7 Qh5 20. h3 Ne5 21. Qc2 f4 22. gxf4 Bxh3 23. Qxe4 Bxg2 24. Kxg2 Rb4 25. Qxb4 Qg4+ 26. Kh2 Qh4+ 27. Kg2 Ng4 28. Be3 Qh2+ 29. Kf3 Ne5+ 30. Ke4 Rxf4+ 31. Bxf4 Qxf4+ 32. Kd5 Qxb4 33. Nxa6 Qc4# 0-1

Behling, Robert (2290)- Spraggett, Kevin (2540) 0-1
A89 Vienna op 1990
1. c4 f5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. g3 g6 4. Bg2 Bg7 5. O-O O-O 6. d4 d6 7. Nc3 Nc6 8. d5 Ne5 9. Nxe5 dxe5 10. Qb3 Kh8 11. c5 h6 12. Rd1 g5 13. a4 f4 14. Ne4 Nxe4 15. Bxe4 Qe8 16. Ra3 Qh5 17. Qd3 g4 18. Rd2 Bf5 19. Rc2 Rad8 20. gxf4 exf4 21. Bxf4 Bxe4 22. Qxe4 Rxd5 23. Rd3 Rxd3 24. exd3 g3 25. f3 gxh2+ 26. Rxh2 Qxc5+ 27. Be3 Qd6 28. Rg2 b6 29. Rg6 Rf6 30. Rg2 Qe6 31. b4 Qxe4 32. fxe4 Rf3 33.Te2 Txe3 – + 0-1

Sherwin, James T (2309)- Hague, Ben (2227) 0-1
A89 BCF-chT2 0304 (4NCL) 2004
1. Nf3 d6 2. d4 f5 3. c4 Nf6 4. g3 g6 5. Bg2 Bg7 6. O-O O-O 7. Nc3 Nc6 8. d5 Ne5 9. Nxe5 dxe5 10. Qb3 Kh8 11. c5 h6 12. a4 g5 13. Bd2 a6 14. Rad1 Qe8 15. Qb4 f4 16. Qa5 Qh5 17. f3 g4 18. gxf4 gxf3 19. exf3 Bh3 20. fxe5 Bxg2 21. exf6 Rxf6 22. Kxg2 Rg6+ 23. Kh1 Be5 24. Rf2 Bxh2 0-1

Novikov, Igor A (2591)- Braunlich, Tom (Unr) 1-0
A89 Portsmouth Millennium op 2000
1. d4 f5 2. g3 Nf6 3. Bg2 g6 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. O-O O-O 6. c4 d6 7. Nc3 Nc6 8. d5 Ne5 9. Nxe5 dxe5 10. Qb3 Kh8 11. c5 a6 12. Rd1 Rb8 13. Bd2 Bd7 14. Rac1 h6 15. Qa3 g5 16. c6 Bc8 17. cxb7 Bxb7 18. Na4 e4 19. Ba5 Ne8 20. Nc5 Qd6 21. Bb4 Bc8 22. Rc4 Qg6 23. Bc3 Nd6 24. Rb4 Rb5 25. Nxa6 Bxa6 26. Qxa6 Rxb4 27. Bxb4 Bxb2 28. Qc6 f4 29. Qxc7 Qf6 30. Bxd6 exd6 31. Bxe4 Rf7 32. Qb8+ Rf8 33. Qb7 Rf7 34. Qc8+ Rf8 35. Qe6 fxg3 36. Qxf6+ Bxf6 37. hxg3 Ra8 38. Rd2 Bc3 39. Rc2 Ra3 40. Bd3 Kg7 41. Bc4 Bd4 42. Bb3 Bc5 43. Rc4 Ra7 44. Re4 Rf7 45. e3 h5 46. Kg2 g4 47. Ba4 Ra7 48. Kf1 Kf6 49. Bb3 Ba3 50. Re6+ Kg5 51. Bc2 Rg7 52. Kg2 h4 53. gxh4+ Kxh4 54. Re4 Kh5 55. Bd1 Bb2 56. Rxg4 Rxg4+ 57. Kh3 1-0

Thingstad, Even (1893) v Mikalsen, Erlend (Unr)
Arctic Chess Challenge Tromsoe
08/07/2007 Round: 4
ECO: A89 Dutch, Leningrad, main variation with Nc6
1. d4 f5 2. g3 Nf6 3. Bg2 g6 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. O-O d6 6. c4 O-O 7. Nc3 Nc6 8. d5 Ne5 9. Nxe5 dxe5 10. c5 e4 11. Qb3 Kh8 12. Rd1 b6 13. Bf4 bxc5 14. Qa3 Nh5 15. Be3 f4 16. Bxc5 f3 17. Bf1 Rf7 18. Nxe4 Bg4 19. Ng5 Rf5 20. exf3 Rxg5 21. Bxe7 Qb8 22. Bxg5 Bxb2 23. Qe3 Bxf3 24. Qxf3 Qb4 25. d6 1-0

Yannick Pelletier (2571) v Francisco Vallejo Pons (2648)
Biel 2002 A89
1. d4 f5 2. g3 g6 3. Bg2 Bg7 4. c4 Nf6 5. Nc3 d6 6. Nf3 O-O 7. O-O Nc6 8. d5 Ne5 9. Nxe5 dxe5 10. c5 Kh8 11. Qb3 h6 12.Rd1 a6 13. Bd2 Qe8 14. Rac1 g5 15.Na4 e4 16. Ba5 Bd7 17. Nc3 Rc8 18. Qxb7 Rb8 19. Qxc7 Rc8 20. Qb7 Rb8 21.Qxa6Ra8 22. Qb6 Rb8 23. Qa6 Ra8 24. Qc4 Rxa5 25. c6 Bc8 26. b4 Ra8 27. b5 Qd8 28.Qc5 Ne8 29. b6 Nd6 30. Rb1 Ba6 31. a4 Qb8 32. Nb5 Bxb5 33. axb5 Ra2 34. b7 Be5 35. Rdc1 Ra4 36. e3 Kh7 37. Bh3 h5 38. Qc2 Ra5 39. Bf1 f4 40. Bg2 fxe3 41. fxe3 Kg7 42. Bxe4 Rxb5 43. Bh7 Rxb1 44. Rxb1 Ne8 45. Qg6+ Kh8 46. Qh6 Bg7 47. Qxg5 Kxh7 48. Qxe7 Rf5 49. c7 Nxc7 50. Qe4 Kg6 51. Rf1 Qxb7 52. Qxf5+ Kh6 53. d6 Nd5 54. Qe6+ Kh7 55. Qe4+ 1-0