Anna Muzychuk Plays Early Qe2 in the B31 Sicilian, Nimzovich-Rossolimo Attack

In the post, Women’s Candidates Tournament underway, by Kevin Spraggett, published June 2, 2019, the Grandmaster writes about the second round game between Anna Muzychuk and Nana Dzagnidze. After the moves, 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 g6 4.O-O Bg7 5.c3 Nf6 6.Qe2 !? we read, “Not the mainline according to ‘theory’, but quite possibly the best line! The Muzychuk sisters are always on the leading edge of new ideas in the openings.”

The Muzychuk sisters

previously played the Leningrad Dutch and I looked forward to any tournament in which they competed. Then they stopped playing the LD and I spent as much time with them as with yesterday’s newspaper…

Regular readers will immediately know what comes next but for those who know little of the AW I suggest simply putting “Qe2” in the question box and you will learn, grasshopper.

Inquiring minds will want to know if the Qe2 move in the game is “quite possibly the best line!”

Anna Muzychuk vs Nana Dzagnidze


Anna Muzychuk vs. Nana Dzagnidze | Photo: Eteri Kublashvili

Women’s Candidate Tournament

Round 2

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 g6 4.O-O Bg7 5.c3 Nf6 6.Qe2

Kevin writes, “Not the mainline according to ‘theory’, but quite possibly the best line! The Muzychuk sisters are always on the leading edge of new ideas in the openings.” 6…O-O 7.d4 d5 8.e5 Ne4 9.Rd1! According to my database, a new move. I like it.”

We begin after, 1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5 g6 (Stockfish prefers 3…e6) 4.O-O Bg7 5.c3 (Komodo 13.01 would play 5 Bxc6) 5…Nf6 (The Fish among programs would print out 5…e5)

And here we are: 6 Qe2. Six Re1 has been played most often according to the CBDB, showing 1675 games with the move, which is the choice of the Dragon. The move preferred by the Fish, 6 d3, has only been played a couple of dozen times. Six e5 has been played a couple of dozen times more than 6 Qe2, but fourteen fewer times than 6 Re1)

6…O-O 7. d4 d5 (7…cxd4 has been played most often, and it is the choice of SF 310519 at depth 31, but go one click deeper and the Fish changes it’s mind while deciding on the game move 7…d5)

8. e5 (Almost invariably played but Stockfish would play 8 exd5) Ne4 9. Rd1! (GM Spraggett writes, “According to my database, a new move. I like it.” According the the CBDB Stockfish 310519 at depth 29 would play 9 Be3, but Stockfish 10 at depth 28 would play 9 Rd1 TN)

The rest of the game: cxd4 10. cxd4 f6 11. Nc3 Nxc3 12. bxc3 fxe5 13. Nxe5 Qc7 14. Nd3 Bf5 15. Bf4 Qa5 16. Bxc6 bxc6 17. Nb4 Rac8 18. Rac1 Be4 19. Bg5 c5 20. dxc5 Qxc5 21. Be3 d4 22. Bxd4 Bxd4 23. Qxe4 Bxf2+ 24. Kh1 Qe3 25. Qc2 Rc5 26. Nd3 Rg5 27. Qb3+ Kg7 28. Nxf2 Rxg2 29. Qb7 Rxh2+ 30. Kxh2 Rxf2+ 31. Qg2 h5 32. Re1 Qd2 33. Qxf2 Qxf2+ 34. Kh1 e5 35. c4 g5 36. c5 g4 37. Rf1 Qh4+ 38. Kg1 Qg3+ 39. Kh1 Qh3+ 40. Kg1 Qe3+ 41. Kh1 Qe4+ 42. Kg1 g3 0-1

From this we can conclude Grandmaster Kevin Spraggett

is on to something when he writes, “The Muzychuk sisters are always on the leading edge of new ideas in the openings.”

I do not know if the sisters Muzychuk utilize the fantastic ChessBaseDataBase (https://database.chessbase.com/) but the CBDB provides anyone who does use it to find new, and/or different opening move choices galore, as shown regularly on this blog. The game with GM Spraggett’s annotations and comments can be found @ http://www.spraggettonchess.com/womens-candidates-tournament-underway/

True Champion Anna Muzychuk REFUSES to defend her title in Saudi Arabia

Double world chess champion, 27, REFUSES to defend her title in Saudi Arabia in defiance of the full-length robes women are required to wear in the kingdom

Anna Muzychuk, 27, is World Champion of two chess disciplines
The Ukrainian has refused to play in this year’s championship
It is being held in Saudi Arabia where women are routinely oppressed
She says her refusal is in response to gender inequality in Saudi Arabia

By Sara Malm For Mailonline

Published: 11:59 EST, 26 December 2017 | Updated: 12:05 EST, 26 December 2017

A reigning chess World Champion is refusing to defend her title’s in this weeks world tournament because it is being held in Saudi Arabia where women are living under oppression.

Anna Muzychuk, 27, from Lviv, Ukraine is the World No 1 in two speed disciplines – rapid and blitz – and shocked the chess world when she announced that she would not be competing in the championships.

Ms Muzychuk said it would go against her principles to subject herself to the Saudi Arabian laws which requires women to cover themselves and not walk unaccompanied in public.


True champion: Anna Muzychuk, 27, from Ukraine, says it would go against her principles to subject herself to the Saudi Arabian laws which requires women to cover themselves

‘In a few days I am going to lose two World Champion titles – one by one. Just because I decided not to go to Saudi Arabia,’ Ms Muzychuk wrote in a statement on her Facebook.

‘Not to play by someone’s rules, not to wear abaya, not to be accompanied getting outside, and altogether not to feel myself a secondary creature.

‘Exactly one year ago I won these two titles and was about the happiest person in the chess world but this time I feel really bad. I am ready to stand for my principles and skip the event, where in five days I was expected to earn more than I do in a dozen of events combined.

‘All that is annoying, but the most upsetting thing is that almost nobody really cares. That is a really bitter feeling, still not the one to change my opinion and my principles.’


Defining: Ms Muzychuk is seen during the Women’s World Chess Championship 2017 at Espinas Palace Hotel in Tehran, Iran in March

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5213169/World-chess-champ-REFUSES-defend-title-Saudi-Arabia.html#ixzz52TZ5L9vS

The Leningrad Dutch

After the penultimate round of the 50th USSR Championship, Anatoly Karpov was in the lead by half a point over his last round opponent, Vladimir Tukmov, who had scored 8 ½. Karpov had white and the game was drawn in 15 moves. Lev Poluagaevsky also had 8 ½ points, and had white against Vladimir Malaniuk, who, along with, Lerner, Azmaiparashvili, and Razuvaev were the qualifying winners of the four Otborochny tournaments. Malaniuk was at minus one with 6 ½ points. Vaganian beat Yusupov in 52 moves to score 9 points and tie with Tukmakov for second, while all eyes turned to the Polugaevsky vs Malaniuk game. A win for Polugaevsky would mean sharing first place with Karpov. With the Azmaiparashvili-Petrosian lasting only 11 moves, and Balashov-Lerner 16, there were plenty of eyes to watch those like Agzamov-Beliavsky who battled to move 40 before splitting the point, and the other aforementioned games.
The game was a Dutch, although chessgames.com (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1112474) calls it the, “Rat Defense: See also: Modern Defense (for lines with …g6 (A41).”
365chess.com (http://www.365chess.com/view_game.php?g=2360197) calls it the “Old Indian defense.”
Take a look at the game and decide for yourself what it should be called. Keep in mind that GM Vladimir Malaniuk has been the most prolific player of the Leningrad Dutch. For example, after 1 d4 f5 Malaniuk has 328 games listed at http://www.365chess.com, more than twice the total of the next two players combined.
This game made a big impression on me. A player from the old days would come to the House of Pain sporadically, each time asking, “You still playing that LENINGRAD?” I would always respond with, “Every chance I get.” He would smile as if everything was still right in the chess world.
I have followed Anna Muzychuk with interest because she plays the Dutch. Her younger sister, Mariya, has made the Leningrad Dutch a family affair. Compare this game played by Mariya with the previous game: http://www.365chess.com/view_game.php?g=3850722
My favorite Star Trek episode is “Court Martial.” It aired 2/2/67, or in Trek terms, Stardate: 2947.3. Captain Kirk finds himself on trial for the death of Lieutenant Commander Ben Finney. Kirk’s former girlfriend, Lt. Areel Shaw, is assigned to prosecute him, but tells him she has arranged for a lawyer. Samuel T. Cogley is the attorney. Later Kirk was asked if he had an attorney. After mentioning Samuel T. Cogley, the questioner said, “What did you hire him for? He still uses BOOKS!”
Samuel T. was a curmudgeon; someone who looked as if he belonged in the library. He went to one of the myriad shelves and took down a dusty tome, blew a cloud of dust, and found the answer in it. The episode is from season one, number 20. This is the episode in which Spock explains that having programmed the computer for chess himself just months before, the best he should have been able to do is stalemate. If you would like to read more about the episode, click here: (http://www.startrek.com/database_article/court-martial).
Although I looked long and hard, I was unable to find the next game online. I’m sure it is up there in the cloud somewhere, but it escaped me. That sent me to the shelves, well actually, box, where I located one of my all-time favorite books, “The Leningrad Dutch,” by T. D. Harding, published in 1976. I had previously gone to a certain page enough that it opened at the page containing the game between Anatoly Karpov and Jacobsen in the USSR vs Scandinavia junior match in 1968. This is my all-time favorite Leningrad game.
Karpov vs Jacobsen, USSR vs Scandinavia junior match 1968

1.d4 f5 2.g3 g6 3.Bg2 Bg7 4.Nf3 Nf6 5.0–0 0–0 6.c4 d6 7.Nc3 Nc6 8.d5 Ne5 9.Nxe5 dxe5 10.e4 f4 11.b3 g5 12.f3 Qd6 13.g4 h5 14.h3 hxg4 15.fxg4 Bd7 16.a4 Qb6+ 17.Kh2 Kf7 18.Bf3 Rh8 19.Kg2 Rh4 20.a5 Qc5 21.Ba3 Qe3 22.Qe1 Bxg4 23.hxg4 Nxg4 24.Rh1 Rxh1 25.Qxe3 Nxe3+ 26.Kxh1 g4 27.Be2 f3 28.Bc5 Bh6 29.Re1 b6 30.Bxf3 bxc5 31.Bd1 Kg6 32.Nb5 Bf4 33.Rxe3 Bxe3 34.Nxc7 Rh8+ 35.Kg2 Rh4 36.a6 Bf4 37.Kg1 g3 38.Bf3 Rh2 39.Bg2 Kf7 40.Kf1 Rh6 41.Ke2 Rb6 0-1