The Dragon vs The Magician

The TCEC Season 10 – Superfinal between defending Champion Komodo and challenger Houdini has begun! As I write game five has just ended and game six began immediately. Games are played 24/7 until all ONE HUNDRED games are finished. I wonder what La Bourdonnais and McDonnell, who played a series of six matches, a total of eighty-five games, between June and October 1834, would have to say about the Superfinal?

Before calling it an evening about ten o’clock last night it looked as though the Dragon would score first with the Black pieces in a MacCutcheon variation of the French defense. TCEC narrows it down further to, “Lasker, 7.bxc3.” Imagine my surprise to learn this morning that it was not the Dragon taking the lead, but the escape artist known as Houdini the Magician! Houdini managed to draw the game, with much help from Komodo, and then draw first blood by beating the Dragon’s “Sicilian: Taimanov, 6.Be3 a6 7.Qd2.”

I have been following the TCEC computer program championships for years. I still enjoy watching the games played by humans, but let’s face it, if it were Baseball the only way to describe it would be akin to watching minor league baseball as opposed to Major League Baseball. The difference in the lay is so great now that humans could be described as playing at least two levels lower than computer programs, something along the line of the difference between MLB and class AA baseball, maybe even class A. Do not get me wrong, I have watched, and enjoyed, many a minor league baseball game, and, for that matter, many college baseball games, in many different cities, but if I want to watch the best baseball being played, I must go to a MLB game. That is one reason I have found it so humorous that the F.I.P.s at FIDE have decided to try and bilk the small Chess public out of all they can by charging to watch the games played during real time. Back in my day we waited until the next day for the games of the World Championship to appear in a newspaper, and WE LIKED IT! Now the fools in power charge for what one can obtain just a few hours later on the internet after the completion of the games. As far as Chess moves go this one is what GM Yasser Seriwan would call a “Howler.” The only thing FIDE has done is hurt people like Mark Crowther, who has put out The Week In Chess for decades. (http://theweekinchess.com/) I mention TWIC because Mark shows only a Chess board and the moves, without any kind of analysis whatsoever, for those of us who prefer to actually THINK about what move may come next. These FIDE people are so stupid they do not even realize they are damaging the game because the GAMES are PUBLICITY, which bring more PEOPLE into CHESS. If it were not so serious I would LAUGH. As it is, it makes one want to CRY. What FIDE is doing is reminiscent of greedy MLB owners refusing to allow radio, and then television, broadcasts thinking it would cut down on attendance, until one owner thought it could possibly be good for the game by bringing the game to the fans, thereby engendering more fans.

The Superfinal is the third stage of the Championships. I was transfixed by the first stage this season, the tenth, as what many would call “offbeat” openings were used. This was right up my alley! When playing over the board I built an opening repertoire (http://www.mark-weeks.com/aboutcom/aa02i07.htm) consisting of hand written openings kept in what one legendary player called “Bacon’s book of death lines!” Before lost in what I now call the “Crazy Cousin Linda Flood,” the BODL was intact except for the cover, which had been lost somewhere on the Chess road who knows when. Now whole books are written devoted to what were my “death lines,” such as, The Extreme Caro-Kann: Attacking Black with 3.f3, by Alexey Bezgodov. I hope to live long enough to see a book on 2 Qe2 versus the French.

The expected media follows after a data dump. Here are the games I copied from the first stage, hoping to find time to look at each and every one of them. This should give those of you asking “Who are you?” insight to my Chess character.

TCEC Season 10 Stage 1 games

Chiron 040917 (3004)
Stockfish 041017 (3227)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
1
2017.10.14
A84
Dutch: 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3

1. c4 e6 2. Nf3 f5 3. d4 Bb4+ 4. Bd2 Bxd2+ 5. Nbxd2 Nf6 6. e3 O-O 7. Bd3 d6 8. Qc2 c5 9. O-O g6 10. a3 Nc6 11. b4 b6 12. b5 Na5 13. Rfe1 Nd7 14. e4 Qf6 15. d5 e5 16. h3 f4 17. Nh2 Qe7 18. Qd1 Kg7 19. Ng4 h5 20. Nh2 Nf6 21. Ndf3 Nh7 22. Nd2 Kh6 23. Be2 Bd7 24. Rc1 Rf7 25. Kh1 Nf6 26. h4 g5 27. hxg5+ Kxg5 28. Rg1 Rg8 29. g3 Kh6 30. Qe1 Rfg7 31. Rc3 Kh7 32. Rg2 h4 33. g4 Kh8 34. Rh3 Rh7 35. Qd1 Rh6 36. Kg1 Nb7 37. Nhf1 Rh7 38. f3 Nh5 39. Bd3 Nd8 40. Rgh2 Ng3 41. Qa4 Nf7 42. Qxa7 Qd8 43. Qa4 Rg6 44. Qc2 Kg8 45. a4 Rgh6 46. Be2 Ng5 47. Bd1 Qa8 48. Nb1 Nxh3+ 49. Rxh3 Nh5 50. Kf2 Nf6 51. Ke1 Rh8 52. Nfd2 Kf7 53. Nc3 Qa5 54. Kf1 Rg8 55. Ndb1 Rhh8 56. Na2 Nh7 57. Nd2 Ng5 58. Rh2 h3 59. Qd3 Nxf3 60. Bxf3 Bxg4 61. Nc3 Bd7 62. Qc2 Rg3 63. Ne2 Rg7 64. Rh1 h2 65. Bg2 Qa8 66. Nf3 Qg8 67. Nxf4 exf4 68. e5 Ke7 69. Rxh2 Rxh2 70. Nxh2 Qh8 71. exd6+ Kxd6 72. Qc3 Rg8 73. Qxh8 Rxh8 74. Nf3 Ra8 75. a5 0-1

Hannibal 121017 (3012)
Fruit 3.2 (2606)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
1
2017.10.14
A00
Polish: 1…Nf6 2.Bb2 e6

1. b4 Nf6 2. Bb2 e6 3. a3 a5 4. b5 d5 5. c4 Nbd7 6. e3 Bd6 7. Nf3 O-O 8. cxd5 exd5 9. Qc2 Rb8 10. Bd4 c5 11. bxc6 Qc7 12. Nc3 bxc6 13. Be2 c5 14. Bxf6 Nxf6 15. Nb5 Qb6 16. O-O Bd7 17. Nxd6 Qxd6 18. Rfb1 c4 19. Rxb8 Rxb8 20. d3 cxd3 21. Bxd3 a4 22. Nd4 Rc8 23. Qb2 Ng4 24. Nf3 Qf6 25. Qxf6 Nxf6 26. Ne5 Be8 27. Kf1 Rc3 28. Be2 Kf8 29. Nf3 Bd7 30. Ne5 Ke7 31. Ke1 Ke6 32. Nf3 g6 33. Nd4+ Ke5 34. Bd1 Ne4 35. Ne2 Rc8 36. Rb1 Rc4 37. Rb6 Rc6 38. Rb4 Rc4 39. Rxc4 dxc4 40. f3 Nc5 41. Kd2 Kd6 42. Bc2 Nb3+ 43. Kc3 Kc5 44. g4 h6 45. Ng3 Bc6 46. Be4 Bd5 47. h4 Be6 48. h5 gxh5 49. Nxh5 Nc1 50. Kd2 Nb3+ 51. Kc2 Bc8 52. Kc3 Nc1 53. Ng3 Bd7 54. Bc2 Kd5 55. Ne4 Bb5 56. f4 Bc6 57. Nf6+ Kc5 58. Ng8 Ne2+ 59. Kd2 Bf3 60. Nxh6 Ng3 61. Nf5 Nf1+ 62. Ke1 Nh2 63. g5 c3 64. Bxa4 Be4 65. Ng3 Bd5 66. Kd1 Ng4 67. Ke2 Kc4 68. Bc2 Kc5 69. Bd3 Kc6 70. Ne4 c2 71. Bxc2 Be6 72. Bd3 Kb6 73. Ng3 Nh2 74. Nf5 Kc5 75. Kf2 Bd5 76. Nh6 Kd6 77. e4 Bb3 1-0

Komodo 1937.00 (3230)
Wasp 2.5 (2824)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
2
2017.10.15
C25
Vienna: 2…Bc5 3.Nf3

1. e4 e5 2. Nc3 Bc5 3. Nf3 d6 4. Na4 Nf6 5. Nxc5 dxc5 6. d3 Nc6 7. Be2 a5 8. h3 a4 9. O-O O-O 10. c3 Qe7 11. Bd2 Rd8 12. Qc2 Nh5 13. Rfd1 h6 14. Be3 Nf4 15. Bxf4 exf4 16. Rd2 Ne5 17. d4 Nxf3+ 18. Bxf3 Be6 19. Kh2 g6 20. Qd3 Kg7 21. Qe2 f6 22. e5 cxd4 23. Rxd4 Rxd4 24. cxd4 c6 25. Qd2 f5 26. d5 cxd5 27. Qxf4 Qc5 28. Rc1 Qb6 29. h4 d4 30. Be2 Rc8 31. Rxc8 Bxc8 32. Bc4 Qc5 33. Bd3 h5 34. Qg3 Kf7 35. f4 Be6 36. Qg5 Qe7 37. Qxe7+ Kxe7 38. a3 Bd5 39. Kg3 Bc6 40. Kf2 b5 41. Be2 Kd7 42. Ke1 Kc7 43. Kd2 Kb6 44. e6 Bxg2 45. e7 Bc6 46. Kd3 Kc5 47. Bf3 Be8 48. Bd1 Kd6 49. Kxd4 Kxe7 50. Kd5 Kf6 51. Kd6 Bf7 52. Bf3 Bc4 53. Bc6 Kf7 54. Kc5 Ke7 55. Bxb5 Bxb5 56. Kxb5 g5 57. fxg5 f4 58. Kc4 Ke6 59. Kd3 Ke5 60. g6 Kf6 61. Ke4 Kxg6 62. Kxf4 Kf6 63. Ke4 Ke6 1-0

Houdini 6.02 (3184)
Laser 200917 (2660)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
2
2017.10.16
B10
Caro-Kann: English Variation

1. c4 c6 2. e4 d6 3. d4 Nd7 4. Be2 e5 5. Nf3 h6 6. Nc3 Ngf6 7. O-O Be7 8. Be3 Ng4 9. Bd2 g6 10. Qc2 Bf6 11. d5 Be7 12. Rad1 Ngf6 13. Be3 c5 14. Ne1 g5 15. a3 Nf8 16. b4 b6 17. g3 Bh3 18. Ng2 Ng6 19. Bd2 Qd7 20. Rfe1 Bd8 21. Ne3 Ne7 22. f3 a6 23. Kh1 Rg8 24. Rg1 h5 25. Rb1 Rh8 26. bxc5 bxc5 27. Ncd1 Ng6 28. Nf2 g4 29. Nf5 Ne7 30. Rb7 Bc7 31. Bg5 Nxf5 32. exf5 Nh7 33. Bh4 gxf3 34. Nxh3 fxe2 35. Qxe2 Qc8 36. Rgb1 Nf8 37. Ng5 Rb8 38. Rxb8 Bxb8 39. Ne4 Nd7 40. Qd2 Bc7 41. Qg5 Kf8 42. Qe7+ Kg7 43. g4 Qd8 44. f6+ Kg8 45. Nxd6 Qxe7 46. fxe7 Kh7 1-0

Fruit 3.2 (2606)
Ginkgo 2 (3042)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
2
2017.10.16
A89
Dutch: Leningrad, Main Line, 7.Nc3 Nc6

1. g3 f5 2. Bg2 Nf6 3. d4 g6 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. O-O O-O 6. c4 d6 7. Nc3 Nc6 8. Qc2 e5 9. dxe5 dxe5 10. Be3 e4 11. Rad1 Qe8 12. Ng5 h6 13. Nh3 g5 14. Kh1 Qh5 15. Nd5 f4 16. Ndxf4 gxf4 17. Nxf4 Qf7 18. h3 Re8 19. g4 Ne5 20. b3 Bd7 21. Kg1 Bc6 22. Rd4 b6 23. Rdd1 a5 24. Rd2 a4 25. Nd5 axb3 26. axb3 Ra5 27. Nxf6+ Qxf6 28. Rc1 Qh4 29. Rcd1 Ng6 30. Rd5 Bxd5 31. cxd5 Qe7 32. Qc4 Kh7 33. Rc1 Qe5 34. Qxc7 Qxd5 35. Qxb6 Rb5 36. Qa6 Re7 37. Qa4 Rxb3 38. Bc5 Re6 39. Be3 Rxe3 40. fxe3 Qd2 41. Rc7 Qxe3+ 42. Kh1 Qxe2 43. Qa1 Ne7 44. Qb1 Nd5 45. Rf7 Ne3 46. Bf3 Qc2 47. Qxc2 Nxc2 48. Bd1 Nd4 49. Kg2 0-1

Chiron 040917 (3004)
Nirvana 2.4 (3034)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
3
2017.10.16
B01
Scandinavian: 2…Qxd5 3.Nf3 Nf6

1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Nf6 3. Nf3 Qxd5 4. Nc3 Qd8 5. d4 e6 6. Bc4 a6 7. a4 Be7 8. O-O Nc6 9. Re1 O-O 10. Bf4 Nd5 11. Bg3 Bb4 12. Qd3 Ba5 13. Red1 Ncb4 14. Qd2 Nc6 15. Bb3 Nce7 16. Qd3 Nf5 17. Ne4 c6 18. c3 Nxg3 19. hxg3 Bc7 20. Re1 a5 21. Rad1 f6 22. Nc5 Re8 23. Qd2 b6 24. Nd3 Bd6 25. g4 Be7 26. Qe2 Bf8 27. g5 fxg5 28. Qe4 Bb7 29. Nde5 Bd6 30. c4 Nf6 31. Qd3 Bxe5 32. dxe5 Qxd3 33. Rxd3 Nh5 34. Nxg5 Nf4 35. Rd7 Rab8 36. g3 h6 37. gxf4 hxg5 38. fxg5 c5 39. g6 Rf8 40. Bc2 Bf3 41. Bd1 Rf4 42. Bxf3 Rxf3 43. Re7 Rf4 44. Rxe6 Rxc4 45. Rc6 Rxa4 46. Kh2 Rg4 47. Kh3 Rd4 48. e6 Kf8 49. Rc7 Rd6 50. f4 b5 51. f5 Rbd8 52. f6 Rd3+ 1-0

Rybka 4.1 (3102)
Fruit 3.2 (2606)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
3
2017.10.16
B01
Scandinavian: Scandinavian Gambit

1. e4 c6 2. c4 d5 3. exd5 Nf6 4. Qa4 Qd7 5. Nc3 cxd5 6. Qxd7+ Nbxd7 7. d3 dxc4 8. dxc4 e5 9. Nf3 b6 10. Be2 Bb4 11. Bd2 Bb7 12. O-O O-O 13. Rad1 Rfd8 14. a3 Bc5 15. Bg5 h6 16. Bxf6 Nxf6 17. Rxd8+ Rxd8 18. Nxe5 Re8 19. Nf3 Ne4 20. Nxe4 Bxe4 21. Rd1 Be7 22. Kf1 Bf6 23. Rd2 Bf5 24. h3 h5 25. Bd1 Be6 26. b3 Bc8 27. Ne1 g6 28. Bf3 Bf5 29. g4 hxg4 30. hxg4 Bc8 31. Nc2 Kg7 32. Ne3 Be7 33. b4 Bg5 34. Rd3 Ba6 35. Rc3 Rc8 36. Bd5 Rd8 37. Ke2 Bc8 38. Kf3 Bf6 39. Rc1 Bb2 40. Rb1 Bf6 41. Rd1 Be7 42. Rc1 Bf6 43. c5 Bb2 44. cxb6 Bxc1 45. bxa7 Bd7 46. Nc4 Ba4 47. a8=Q Rxa8 48. Bxa8 Bb3 49. Ne3 Ba4 50. Nd5 Bxa3 51. Ke4 Bb2 52. f3 Kh6 53. Kf4 Bc1+ 54. Ke5 Bb2+ 55. Kd6 Bd4 56. Bc6 Bd1 57. Nc7 Kg5 58. Ke7 Be5 59. Kd7 Bd4 60. b5 Kf4 61. Ke8 Bb3 62. Ke7 Bc5+ 63. Kd7 Bd4 64. Be4 f5 65. gxf5 gxf5 66. Bc6 Ke5 67. Ba8 Bc4 68. Bb7 Be3 69. Bc6 Bc5 70. Na8 Be6+ 1/2-1/2

Gull 3 (3112)
Komodo 1937.00 (3230)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
3
2017.10.17
B90
Sicilian: Najdorf

1. e4 d6 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nc3 c5 4. d4 cxd4 5. Nxd4 a6 6. Qd3 Nbd7 7. Be2 e6 8. a4 b6 9. Nb3 Qc7 10. Bf4 Ne5 11. Qd4 Bb7 12. O-O Be7 13. Qe3 O-O 14. Bg3 h6 15. Rad1 Rac8 16. h3 Rfd8 17. Rd4 Nfd7 18. Rfd1 Nc5 19. Kh1 Ng6 20. Bh5 Bg5 21. Qe1 Nf4 22. Bf3 h5 23. Bh2 Qe7 24. h4 Bh6 25. g3 Nxb3 26. cxb3 e5 27. Rb4 d5 28. Nxd5 Nxd5 29. exd5 Rd6 30. Rc4 Rcd8 31. Kg1 f5 32. Qc3 Bxd5 33. Bxd5+ Rxd5 34. Rxd5 Rxd5 35. Kg2 e4 36. Rd4 Rxd4 37. Qxd4 Qb7 38. Bg1 g6 39. b4 b5 40. a5 Kh7 41. Qb6 Qc8 42. Qc5 Qd7 43. f4 exf3+ 44. Kxf3 f4 45. gxf4 Qg4+ 46. Ke4 Qxf4+ 47. Kd5 Qf3+ 48. Ke6 Qh3+ 49. Kd5 Qh1+ 50. Ke6 Qxh4 51. Kd7 Qe4 52. Kc7 Bf4+ 53. Kb6 Qe6+ 54. Ka7 h4 55. Qb6 Qxb6+ 56. Kxb6 h3 57. Kxa6 g5 58. Kxb5 h2 59. Bxh2 Bxh2 60. Kc4 0-1

Bobcat 8 (2891)
Nemorino 3.04 (2899)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
3
2017.10.17
A03
Bird: 1…d5 2.Nf3 g6 3.e3

1. f4 d5 2. Nf3 g6 3. e3 c5 4. d4 cxd4 5. exd4 e6 6. Bd3 Bd6 7. O-O Ne7 8. Be3 O-O 9. Nbd2 Nf5 10. Bxf5 exf5 11. c4 b6 12. Rc1 Re8 13. Ne5 Bb7 14. Qb3 Bf8 15. c5 Nc6 16. Rfe1 Nxe5 17. fxe5 Re6 18. Nf3 a5 19. Rc3 bxc5 20. dxc5 Rb8 21. Qc2 Rc8 22. Bf2 Qe8 23. Qd2 Rec6 24. Rec1 Qd7 25. b3 R6c7 26. a3 Ba6 27. h3 Qb5 28. Nd4 Qd7 29. c6 Qe7 30. Rc5 a4 31. b4 Bc4 32. Ra5 Qe8 33. Bg3 Rxc6 34. Nxc6 Rxc6 35. Rxa4 Qb8 36. Bf2 Bg7 37. Bd4 Re6 38. Qc3 Bh6 39. Rb1 Bb5 40. Ra5 Rc6 41. Qg3 Re6 42. a4 Bc4 43. b5 Rb6 44. Qc3 Rb7 45. b6 Bg5 46. Rc5 Re7 47. a5 Qb7 48. Qg3 Bd2 49. e6 f4 50. Qh4 Be3+ 51. Bxe3 fxe3 1-0

Nirvana 2.4 (3034)
Arasan 20.2 (2741)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
4
2017.10.17
A03
Bird: Lasker, 3…c5

1. f4 d5 2. e3 Nf6 3. Nf3 c5 4. Bb5+ Nbd7 5. Be2 e6 6. O-O a6 7. c4 Bd6 8. d3 Qc7 9. Nc3 O-O 10. g3 Rd8 11. cxd5 Nxd5 12. Ne4 Be7 13. Nf2 b5 14. e4 Nb4 15. Be3 Nc6 16. b3 e5 17. Rc1 exf4 18. gxf4 Qb6 19. Kh1 Bb7 20. Rg1 Rac8 21. f5 Kh8 22. Ng4 Nd4 23. b4 Nxf3 24. Bxf3 h5 25. Nf2 Ne5 26. Qe2 h4 27. Rg2 a5 28. Rcg1 Bf6 29. Ng4 h3 30. Rg3 Nxg4 31. bxc5 Rxc5 32. Rxg4 Rdc8 33. Qf1 Kg8 34. Qxh3 Kf8 35. Qh7 Qd6 36. Rxg7 Bxg7 37. Qxg7+ Ke7 38. Qh7 Rf8 39. Bh6 Rcc8 40. f6+ Kd7 41. Bxf8 Rxf8 42. Qf5+ Kd8 43. Qxb5 Rh8 44. Bh5 Kc8 45. Rc1+ Kb8 46. Rb1 Qc7 47. Qxb7+ Qxb7 48. Rxb7+ Kxb7 49. Bxf7 Rf8 50. Bd5+ Kb8 1-0

Komodo 1937.00 (3230)
Bobcat 8 (2891)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
4
2017.10.17
B13
Caro-Kann: Panov-Botvinnik, 5…Nc6 6.Nf3

1. e4 c6 2. c4 d5 3. exd5 Nf6 4. d4 cxd5 5. Nc3 Nc6 6. Nf3 g6 7. cxd5 Nxd5 8. Qb3 Nxc3 9. Bc4 e6 10. bxc3 Bg7 11. Ba3 Na5 12. Bb5+ Bd7 13. Qb2 b6 14. Be2 f6 15. O-O Kf7 16. Bb4 Nc6 17. a3 Re8 18. c4 Kg8 19. Rad1 Qc7 20. Rfe1 Nd8 21. Rc1 Nf7 22. h4 Rab8 23. Qc2 Bc6 24. d5 Bb7 25. Qb3 Bh6 26. Rcd1 a5 27. Bc3 e5 28. Rb1 Ba6 29. h5 Bg7 30. Bd2 Nd6 31. Rec1 Nf5 32. Bf1 e4 33. c5 Bxf1 34. d6+ Qf7 35. d7 Red8 36. c6 Ra8 37. Ne5 Qxb3 38. Rxb3 Be2 39. hxg6 fxe5 40. Bg5 Nd4 41. Bxd8 Bg4 42. Rxb6 Nxc6 43. Rcxc6 Bxd7 44. gxh7+ Kxh7 45. Rc7 Rxd8 46. Rd6 e3 47. fxe3 Bf8 48. Rcxd7+ Rxd7 49. Rxd7+ Kg6 50. Ra7 Bxa3 1-0

Hakkapeliitta 210416 (2778)
Laser 200917 (2660)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
4
2017.10.18
A01
Nimzowitsch-Larsen: 1…d5

1. b3 d5 2. e3 Nf6 3. Nf3 Bf5 4. Be2 c5 5. O-O h5 6. d4 cxd4 7. Nxd4 Bc8 8. c4 e6 9. cxd5 exd5 10. Bb2 Nc6 11. Nc3 a6 12. Rc1 Bd6 13. h3 Rh6 14. Bf3 Be5 15. Na4 Qc7 16. Nxc6 Bxb2 17. Nxb2 bxc6 18. Bxd5 Nxd5 19. Qxd5 cxd5 20. Rxc7 Bf5 21. Rd1 Rd8 22. Nd3 Bxd3 23. Rxd3 Rhd6 24. Rd4 R8d7 25. Rc8+ Rd8 26. Rc5 g6 27. h4 Ke7 28. Kf1 Ke6 29. Ke2 Rb8 30. Kd3 Rb5 31. Rc7 Rd7 32. Rxd7 Kxd7 33. e4 Kc6 34. Rxd5 Rb4 35. f4 Rb6 36. Kc4 Kc7 37. e5 Rb7 38. a4 Kb8 39. a5 Kc8 40. Rd6 Rc7+ 41. Kd5 Ra7 42. Kc5 Kc7 43. Rf6 Kd8 44. Kb6 Re7 45. Kxa6 Kc7 46. Kb5 Kb7 1-0

Gaviota 1.01 (2757)
Rybka 4.1 (3102)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
4
2017.10.18
A80
Dutch: 2.Bg5 h6

1. d4 f5 2. Bg5 h6 3. Bf4 Nf6 4. h4 c5 5. e3 cxd4 6. exd4 Nc6 7. Nf3 e6 8. a3 d5 9. Bb5 Bd7 10. Bxc6 Bxc6 11. Ne5 Bd6 12. Ng6 Bxf4 13. Nxh8 Qb6 14. Nc3 Qxb2 15. Rh3 Bc7 16. Kf1 Rc8 17. Kg1 Ng4 18. a4 Qb4 19. Rb1 Qc4 20. Ng6 Kf7 21. h5 Nf6 22. a5 Ne4 23. Ne2 Bb5 24. Re3 Ba6 25. c3 Qc6 26. Ra1 Bxe2 27. Qxe2 Re8 28. Qc2 Nf6 29. Qd1 Ne4 30. Qa4 Qxa4 31. Rxa4 Kf6 32. f4 Rc8 33. c4 dxc4 34. Rxc4 Bxf4 35. Rxe4 Rxc4 36. Rxf4 Ra4 37. Rf3 Rxa5 38. Rb3 b6 39. Nf4 e5 40. dxe5+ Kxe5 41. g3 Ra2 42. Kf1 Rh2 43. Ra3 a5 44. Rb3 Ke4 45. Rxb6 a4 46. Rc6 Ra2 47. Rc3 Kd4 48. Rf3 Ke4 49. Rc3 Kd4 50. Rf3 Ke4 51. Rd3 a3 52. Rb3 Ra1+ 53. Ke2 Ra2+ 54. Kd1 Ra1+ 55. Ke2 Ra2+ 56. Kd1 Ra1+ 57. Kd2 Ra2+ 58. Kc1 Ra1+ 59. Kd2 Ra2+ 60. Kc1 Ra1+ 61. Kc2 a2 62. Kb2 Rb1+ 63. Kxa2 Rxb3 64. Kxb3 Kf3 65. Ne6 Kxg3 66. Nxg7 f4 67. Nf5+ Kg4 68. Nxh6+ 1/2-1/2

Hannibal 121017 (3012)
Chiron 040917 (3004)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
5
2017.10.18
C25
Vienna: 2…d6 3.Bc4

1. Nc3 d6 2. e4 e5 3. Bc4 Be7 4. Qh5 g6 5. Qd1 Nf6 6. Nf3 Nc6 7. d4 Bg4 8. dxe5 dxe5 9. Bh6 Qxd1+ 10. Rxd1 Bxf3 11. gxf3 Nd4 12. Nb5 Nxb5 13. Bxb5+ c6 14. Bf1 Rd8 15. Rxd8+ Bxd8 16. Bh3 Ke7 17. Ke2 Bb6 18. Rd1 Rd8 19. Rxd8 Bxd8 20. Bc8 b6 21. Bg5 Ke8 22. Bh6 Nh5 23. Be3 Nf4+ 24. Bxf4 exf4 25. c3 b5 26. Ba6 Kd7 27. Kd3 Bb6 28. Ke2 Bc5 29. Ke1 g5 30. Kf1 h5 31. Ke2 Bd6 32. h3 h4 33. Kd2 f6 34. a3 Bc5 35. Ke2 Kd6 36. b4 Bb6 37. Ke1 Bc7 38. Kd1 Kd7 39. Ke1 Be5 40. Kd2 Bd6 41. Kd1 Kd8 42. Kc1 Kc7 43. Kc2 Be7 44. Kb3 Bd8 45. Kc2 Kd6 46. Kd2 Kd7 47. Ke1 Bc7 48. Ke2 Bb6 49. Ke1 Kd6 50. Ke2 Ke7 51. Bb7 Kd7 52. Ba6 Kd8 53. Ke1 Kc7 54. Kf1 Kb8 55. Ke1 Bc7 56. Ke2 Be5 57. Kd3 Kc7 58. Kc2 Kb6 59. Bc8 Bc7 60. Kd3 a6 61. Be6 Be5 62. Bf5 Bb8 63. Kc2 Ba7 64. Kd1 Kc7 65. Ke1 Bb6 66. Bg6 Kd7 67. Bf5+ Kd8 68. Ke2 a5 69. Ke1 c5 70. e5 fxe5 71. Bd3 c4 72. Bb1 a4 73. Bc2 Kc7 74. Be4 Kd6 75. Bb1 Bd8 76. Be4 Bc7 77. Bb1 Bb6 78. Bc2 Ba7 79. Be4 Bb8 80. Bb1 Kc7 81. Kd2 Ba7 82. Ke1 Kb6 83. Bc2 Ka6 84. Ke2 Bb8 85. Bb1 Ka7 86. Bc2 Bd6 87. Bb1 Kb6 88. Bc2 Bb8 89. Be4 Ba7 90. Kd2 Kc7 91. Ke2 Bb8 92. Bb1 Kc6 93. Bc2 Bd6 94. Bb1 Bc7 95. Bc2 Bd8 96. Bb1 Kd6 97. Be4 Be7 98. Bc2 Bf6 99. Kd2 Bg7 100. Bb1 Bf8 101. Bc2 Kc7 102. Bb1 Be7 103. Bc2 Bd6 104. Bb1 Bf8 105. Be4 Bg7 106. Bb1 Bf6 107. Bc2 Be7 108. Bb1 Bd8 109. Bc2 Kb6 110. Bb1 Be7 111. Be4 Bd6 112. Bb1 Bc7 113. Bc2 Bb8 114. Bb1 Bd6 115. Bc2 Bf8 116. Bb1 Ka6 117. Ba2 e4 118. Bb1 exf3 119. Bf5 Ka7 120. Bg4 Bd6 121. Bf5 Be5 122. Bg4 Bc7 123. Bh5 Bb6 124. Ke1 Ka6 125. Bg4 Bd8 126. Bf5 Kb6 127. Kd2 Be7 128. Bg4 Bd6 129. Bf5 Be5 130. Bg4 Bf6 131. Bf5 Bg7 132. Kc2 Bf8 133. Bg4 Bd6 134. Kd2 Bb8 135. Bf5 Bc7 136. Bg4 Kc6 137. Bh5 Bb6 138. Ke1 Kd6 139. Bxf3 Bd8 140. Ke2 Bf6 141. Kd2 Be5 142. Be2 Bg7 143. Bf3 Bf6 144. Bd1 Kc6 145. Bg4 Kb6 146. Kc2 Be5 147. Kd2 Bd6 148. f3 Kc6 149. Bf5 Be5 150. Kc2 Bf6 151. Kd2 Be7 152. Be4+ Kb6 153. Bd5 Kc7 154. Be4 Bd6 155. Bf5 Bf8 156. Bg4 Bg7 157. Bf5 Kb7 158. Bb1 Kb6 159. Bf5 Bf8 160. Bb1 Be7 161. Bf5 Bd8 162. Bg4 Bf6 163. Kc2 Be5 164. Bf5 Bh8 165. Be4 Bf6 166. Bf5 Bd8 167. Be4 Bc7 168. Bd5 Be5 169. Be6 Bd6 170. Kb2 Bb8 171. Bg4 Be5 172. Kc2 Kc7 173. Bf5 Kd6 174. Kd2 Bf6 175. Kc2 Bg7 176. Bg4 Be5 177. Bf5 Bh8 178. Bg4 Kc6 179. Bf5 Be5 180. Be4+ Kd7 181. Bf5+ Kc7 182. Be6 Bg7 183. Bg4 Bf6 184. Bf5 Be7 185. Bg4 Bd6 186. Bf5 Bf8 187. Be4 Bh6 188. Bf5 Kb6 189. Be4 Bg7 190. Bf5 Bf8 191. Be4 Be7 192. Bd5 Kc7 193. Be6 Bf6 194. Bf5 Bh8 195. Be4 Bg7 196. Bf5 g4 197. Bxg4 Be5 198. Kd2 Kb6 199. Bf5 Bf6 200. Bb1 Kc7 201. Ba2 Kd6 202. Bb1 1/2-1/2

Fire 6.1 (3113)
Gaviota 1.01 (2757)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
5
2017.10.18
C00
French: Chigorin Variation

1. e4 e6 2. Qe2 d5 3. exd5 Nf6 4. dxe6 Bxe6 5. Nf3 Be7 6. g3 O-O 7. Bg2 Re8 8. O-O c5 9. b3 Nc6 10. Bb2 Bg4 11. h3 Bf5 12. d3 Qd7 13. Kh2 c4 14. bxc4 Ba3 15. Qxe8+ Rxe8 16. Nxa3 a6 17. Nh4 h6 18. Rab1 Bh7 19. Bc3 Qc7 20. Kg1 b6 21. Nf3 Bf5 22. Rfd1 Re2 23. Bf1 Re6 24. Rb3 Qd6 25. Nb1 Nd7 26. Bg2 Re2 27. Nbd2 Bh7 28. Rc1 Bg6 29. Bf1 Re8 30. d4 Bh7 31. h4 Bf5 32. Bd3 Qg6 33. d5 Na7 34. Bd4 Nc8 35. Kg2 Qg4 36. Rh1 h5 37. Rbb1 Re7 38. Rhe1 Rxe1 39. Rxe1 Nd6 40. Be3 Nc8 41. Nb3 Qh3+ 42. Kg1 Qg4 43. Be2 Qg6 44. Bf4 Kf8 45. Bf1 Bg4 46. Nfd4 Nc5 47. Nxc5 bxc5 48. Bd3 Qb6 49. Nb3 Nd6 50. Rb1 a5 51. Nd2 Qa6 52. Rb8+ Ke7 53. Rg8 g6 54. Bg5+ f6 55. Rg7+ Kf8 56. Bh6 Nf7 57. Rxg6+ Nxh6 58. Rxh6 Qb6 59. Ne4 Qb2 60. Rxf6+ Ke8 61. Kg2 a4 62. Ra6 Qa1 63. Ra8+ Kf7 64. Ng5+ Kf6 65. Ra7 Ke5 66. f3 Bc8 67. Rc7 Qc1 1-0

Chiron 040917 (3004)
Ginkgo 2 (3042)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
6
2017.10.20
C24
Bishop’s Opening: Paulsen, 4.Nf3

1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 Nf6 3. d3 c6 4. Nf3 d5 5. Bb3 Bd6 6. exd5 cxd5 7. O-O Nc6 8. Bg5 Be6 9. c4 d4 10. Nbd2 O-O 11. Rc1 Be7 12. Re1 Nd7 13. Ne4 Bf5 14. Bxe7 Qxe7 15. Ba4 f6 16. Nfd2 Nc5 17. Nxc5 Qxc5 18. a3 Ne7 19. b4 Qc7 20. c5 Kh8 21. Qf3 Be6 22. Bb3 Bxb3 23. Nxb3 Qd7 24. Nd2 Nd5 25. Nc4 Nc3 26. Nd6 Rab8 27. Ne4 Nd5 28. g3 a6 29. Nd6 Nc3 30. Nc4 Qe6 31. Kg2 Rf7 32. h4 Kg8 33. Nd6 Rc7 34. h5 h6 35. Qf5 Qd5+ 36. Qf3 Qb3 37. Qg4 a5 38. Kh3 Kh8 39. f4 e4 40. Nxe4 Nxe4 41. Rxe4 Rg8 42. Rce1 Rcc8 43. Rxd4 Qxa3 44. c6 bxc6 45. Rd7 axb4 46. Rxg7 Qxd3 47. Ree7 Qf1+ 48. Kh2 Qf2+ 49. Kh3 Qf1+ 50. Kh2 Qf2+ 51. Kh3 Qf1+ 1/2-1/2

Fruit 3.2 (2606)
Fizbo 1.91 (2899)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
6
2017.10.20
B24
Sicilian: Closed, 3.g3

1. e4 c5 2. g3 Nc6 3. Nc3 h5 4. Nf3 d6 5. d4 cxd4 6. Nxd4 g6 7. Be3 Bg7 8. Qd2 h4 9. Bb5 Kf8 10. O-O-O Bg4 11. Be2 Bxe2 12. Qxe2 hxg3 13. fxg3 Qd7 14. Rhf1 Nf6 15. h4 Ng4 16. Bg1 Bxd4 17. Bxd4 Nxd4 18. Rxd4 Ne5 19. Qf2 Kg7 20. Kb1 b5 21. Nd5 Raf8 22. Qd2 Rc8 23. Qg5 Rce8 24. Rdd1 f6 25. Qe3 a5 26. Qb6 Nc4 27. Qf2 Ne5 28. a3 Qb7 29. c3 Rc8 30. Qe2 Ra8 31. Qe3 Qa7 32. Qd2 Rab8 33. Rf2 Rb7 34. Re2 Qc5 35. Rf2 Rhb8 36. h5 b4 37. cxb4 axb4 38. axb4 Rxb4 39. Nxb4 Rxb4 40. h6+ Kh7 41. Re2 Qb5 42. Rc1 Nc4 43. Qc3 Ra4 44. Rh2 d5 45. exd5 Na3+ 46. Ka1 Qa6 47. bxa3 Rxa3+ 48. Kb1 Rxc3 49. Rxc3 Qb7+ 50. Kc2 Qxd5 51. Kc1 Qe4 52. Rh4 Qe2 53. Ra3 f5 54. Rh1 Qc4+ 55. Kb2 Qd4+ 56. Kc1 g5 57. Rd1 Qc5+ 58. Kb2 Kxh6 59. Rc3 Qb5+ 60. Kc1 Kh5 61. Rdd3 e5 62. Rb3 Qc5+ 63. Rbc3 Qb4 64. Rb3 Qe1+ 65. Rd1 Qe2 66. Rb2 Qf3 67. Rh2+ Kg4 68. Rc2 Kxg3 69. Rg1+ Kh3 70. Re1 e4 71. Kb1 0-1

Fire 6.1 (3113)
Vajolet2 2.3.2 (2918)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
7
2017.10.20
A03
Bird: Lasker Variation

1. f4 d5 2. e3 Nf6 3. b3 Bf5 4. Nf3 e6 5. Bb2 Be7 6. Be2 O-O 7. O-O h6 8. c4 Nc6 9. Ne5 Rb8 10. Qc1 Nb4 11. cxd5 Nfxd5 12. a3 Nc6 13. Nxc6 bxc6 14. b4 c5 15. bxc5 c6 16. Be5 Rxb1 17. Rxb1 Bxb1 18. Qxb1 Qa5 19. Qc2 Bxc5 20. Kh1 Bxa3 21. e4 Nf6 22. Ra1 Qc5 23. Qd3 Bb4 24. Bd4 Qe7 25. Rxa7 Qd8 26. g3 Qb8 27. Ra4 Rd8 28. Qc4 Bxd2 29. Qc2 Be1 30. Kg2 Qb7 31. Kh3 Qd7 32. Bxf6 gxf6 33. Rc4 Rc8 34. f5 e5 35. Ra4 Kg7 36. Bc4 Bd2 37. Ra3 Qe7 38. Ra6 Qd7 39. Qd1 Rd8 40. Rb6 Qd4 41. Qg4+ Bg5 42. Rxc6 h5 43. Qe2 Qa7 44. Ra6 Qg1 45. Ra2 Rh8 46. Qf1 Qb6 47. Bd5 h4 48. Kg2 Qe3 49. gxh4 Rxh4 50. Qe2 Qh3+ 51. Kh1 Rf4 52. Ra1 Qh4 53. Qg2 Qh5 54. Rg1 Qh4 1/2-1/2

Nemorino 3.04 (2899)
Komodo 1937.00 (3230)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
7
2017.10.21
A03
Bird: 1…d5 2.Nf3 c5

1. f4 d5 2. Nf3 c5 3. b3 g6 4. Bb2 Nf6 5. e3 Bg7 6. c4 d4 7. exd4 cxd4 8. Bxd4 Nc6 9. Bc3 O-O 10. b4 e5 11. fxe5 Ne4 12. d4 Bg4 13. Be2 Nxc3 14. Nxc3 Bxf3 15. Bxf3 Nxd4 16. Bxb7 Rb8 17. Bd5 Bxe5 18. Qd3 Nf5 19. Rb1 Re8 20. Ne4 Qh4+ 21. Kd2 Qh6+ 22. Ke2 Ne7 23. g3 Nxd5 24. cxd5 f5 25. Nc5 Bxg3+ 26. Ne6 Bh4 27. Rhd1 Bf6 28. Qg3 Rbc8 29. Kf1 Rc2 30. Kg1 Rec8 31. Rb3 Rc1 32. Rb1 R1c4 33. Kh1 Rg4 34. Qf2 Be5 35. Qd2 Qh5 36. Rf1 Bxh2 37. Qxh2 Rh4 38. Rb2 Rcc4 39. Nf4 Rxh2+ 40. Rxh2 Qg4 41. Ng2 Qg3 42. Ne1 Rc1 43. Re2 f4 44. d6 Rxe1 45. Rfxe1 f3 46. d7 Qh4+ 47. Kg1 0-1

Nemorino 3.04 (2899)
Hakkapeliitta 210416 (2778)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
11
2017.10.25
D07
QGD: Chigorin, 3.Nf3 Bg4 4.cxd5 Bxf3 5.gxf3

1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. c4 Bg4 4. cxd5 Bxf3 5. gxf3 Qxd5 6. e3 O-O-O 7. Nc3 Qh5 8. f4 Qxd1+ 9. Kxd1 e6 10. Bd2 Nf6 11. Rg1 Kb8 12. Ke2 Ne7 13. Na4 Nf5 14. Bg2 Nd5 15. Be4 Nxf4+ 16. exf4 Nxd4+ 17. Kd1 b6 18. Rg3 h5 19. Rc1 g6 20. Rd3 Bg7 21. b4 h4 22. Nb2 h3 23. Nc4 Rh4 24. Bh1 Rg4 25. Be3 Kc8 26. Ne5 Bxe5 27. fxe5 Rd7 28. f3 Nf5 29. Rxd7 Kxd7 30. fxg4 Nxe3+ 31. Kd2 Nxg4 32. Re1 Nxh2 33. Rg1 Ke7 34. Ke3 g5 35. Kf2 g4 36. Rc1 Kd7 37. Bc6+ Ke7 38. Kg3 Kf8 39. Kxh2 1-0

Texel 1.07a35 (2965)
Houdini 6.02 (3184)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
11
2017.10.25
A88
Dutch: Leningrad, Main Line, 7.Nc3 c6 8.b3 Na6

1. Nf3 f5 2. g3 Nf6 3. c4 g6 4. Bg2 Bg7 5. Nc3 d6 6. d4 O-O 7. O-O c6 8. b3 Na6 9. e3 Re8 10. Bb2 Bd7 11. Ne2 Qc7 12. h3 e5 13. h4 Rad8 14. Qd2 h6 15. Rac1 e4 16. Nh2 Bc8 17. Bc3 d5 18. c5 g5 19. hxg5 hxg5 20. Rb1 Qf7 21. Ba5 Rd7 22. Rfc1 Nc7 23. Bh3 Qg6 24. Bxc7 Rxc7 25. b4 f4 26. Bxc8 f3 27. Bh3 Qh5 28. Bg2 Bh8 29. Bxf3 exf3 30. g4 Qh3 31. Nxf3 Ne4 0-1

Jonny 8.1 (3040)
Bobcat 8 (2891)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
14
2017.10.28
A03
Bird: 1…d5 2.Nf3 g6

1. f4 d5 2. Nf3 g6 3. d4 Bg7 4. c4 Nf6 5. cxd5 O-O 6. Nc3 Nxd5 7. e4 Nxc3 8. bxc3 c5 9. Be3 Bg4 10. Be2 cxd4 11. cxd4 Nc6 12. e5 Be6 13. h4 Nb4 14. h5 Rc8 15. h6 Bh8 16. Kf2 Nc2 17. Rc1 Nxe3 18. Kxe3 Bxa2 19. Qa4 Bd5 20. Qxa7 f6 21. Rxc8 Qxc8 22. Qa5 Qc6 23. Rf1 e6 24. Bd3 Qc8 25. Rb1 Qc6 26. Nd2 Bxg2 27. Bc4 fxe5 28. Rb6 exf4+ 29. Ke2 Bf1+ 30. Kxf1 Qh1+ 31. Ke2 Qh2+ 32. Kd3 Qh3+ 33. Kc2 Rc8 34. Rd6 Bf6 35. Qb6 Qf5+ 36. Kb2 Rc6 37. Qxc6 Bxd4+ 38. Kb3 bxc6 39. Bxe6+ Qxe6+ 40. Rxe6 Bc5 1-0

Komodo 1937.00 (3230)
Stockfish 041017 (3227)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
15
2017.10.29
B12
Caro-Kann: Advance, 3…c5

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 c5 4. Nf3 cxd4 5. Nxd4 Nc6 6. Nxc6 bxc6 7. Bd3 e6 8. O-O Ne7 9. Nd2 a5 10. Nf3 Ng6 11. b3 Be7 12. g3 O-O 13. Qe2 Re8 14. h4 Nf8 15. Bf4 c5 16. Nh2 a4 17. Ng4 d4 18. h5 Bb7 19. h6 g6 20. Bb5 Qd5 21. f3 Bc6 22. Bc4 Qd7 23. Kg2 Qd8 24. Rfd1 Nd7 25. b4 cxb4 26. Rxd4 Qb6 27. Qd2 Qc5 28. Rd1 Rab8 29. Be2 Bd5 30. Be3 a3 31. Bd3 Qc3 32. Qxc3 bxc3 33. Ra4 f6 34. Nxf6+ Nxf6 35. exf6 Bxf6 36. Rxa3 Ra8 37. Rxa8 Rxa8 38. Rb1 Kf7 39. Rb5 Be7 40. Bc5 Bg5 41. Bd4 Bxh6 42. Rc5 Kg8 43. Rxc3 Bf8 44. Kf2 Bd6 45. f4 g5 46. fxg5 Bxa2 47. Kg2 Bd5+ 48. Kh3 e5 49. Be3 Ra1 50. Bc4 Bf7 51. Bb3 Bxb3 52. Rxb3 Ra4 53. Rb6 Ba3 54. Rc6 Re4 55. Bd2 Kf7 56. Rf6+ Kg7 57. Ra6 Be7 58. Ra7 Kf8 59. Rc7 Re2 60. Bc1 Re1 61. Bb2 Re4 62. Kg2 Bxg5 63. Rxh7 Re2+ 64. Kf3 Rxc2 65. Rb7 Be7 66. Ke4 Re2+ 67. Kd5 Rc2 68. Bxe5 Ke8 69. Ke4 Ra2 70. Rc7 Ra4+ 71. Kf5 Ra6 72. Rb7 Kf7 73. g4 Ke8 74. Rc7 Bd6 75. Rc8+ Kf7 76. Bc3 Be7 77. Rc7 Ke8 78. g5 Bxg5 79. Kxg5 1/2-1/2

Booot 6.2 (3047)
Hakkapeliitta 210416 (2778)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
15
2017.10.29
A80
Dutch: 2.Nc3 Nf6

1. d4 f5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Bf4 e6 4. e3 d5 5. Nb5 Na6 6. Nf3 Bb4+ 7. c3 Be7 8. c4 O-O 9. Be2 dxc4 10. Bxc4 Nd5 11. Nc3 Nxf4 12. exf4 Nb4 13. Qb3 Rf6 14. a3 Nc6 15. Qd1 Qd6 16. g3 Na5 17. Ba2 Qa6 18. Rc1 b5 19. O-O Nc4 20. Nxb5 Nxb2 21. Qb3 Rb8 22. Nxc7 Rxb3 23. Nxa6 Rxf3 24. Rxc8+ Kf7 25. Nb8 Rxa3 26. Nd7 Kg6 27. Re8 Rxa2 28. Rxe7 Ra4 29. Ne5+ Kh5 30. Rxg7 Nc4 31. Rxh7+ Rh6 32. Rg7 Rf6 33. Rc1 Nxe5 34. dxe5 Rg6 35. Rd7 Rxf4 36. Rh7+ Kg5 37. Rc8 a5 38. Kg2 Rh6 1-0

Chiron 040917 (3004)
Texel 1.07a35 (2965)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
18
2017.11.01
B01
Scandinavian: 2…Qxd5 3.Nc3 Qd8

1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qd8 4. d4 Nf6 5. Nf3 e6 6. Bc4 Bb4 7. O-O O-O 8. Bg5 h6 9. Bxf6 Qxf6 10. Qe2 Bxc3 11. bxc3 Qe7 12. Bd3 Nd7 13. a4 a5 14. Rfe1 Nf6 15. Ne5 Rd8 16. Qf3 c5 17. Rad1 cxd4 18. cxd4 Qc7 19. c4 Bd7 20. Bc2 Bc6 21. Qf4 Be8 22. Rd3 Rac8 23. Rg3 Kh8 24. Rxg7 Kxg7 25. Re3 Nh5 26. Qg4+ Kf8 27. Qxh5 Rxd4 28. Qxh6+ Ke7 29. h4 Qb6 30. Qg5+ Kd6 31. Nf3 Qc5 32. Nxd4 Qxg5 33. hxg5 Rxc4 34. g6 fxg6 35. Rxe6+ Kd7 36. Re4 Rb4 37. f4 Bf7 38. Kf2 b6 39. Ke3 Ba2 40. Re5 Bf7 41. Rg5 Rb2 42. Bxg6 Ba2 1-0

Rybka 4.1 (3102)
Andscacs 0.92 (3094)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
18
2017.11.01
C00
French: Chigorin Variation

1. e4 e6 2. Qe2 d5 3. exd5 Qxd5 4. Nc3 Qa5 5. Nf3 Bd7 6. d4 Nf6 7. Bd2 Nc6 8. O-O-O O-O-O 9. Qe1 Be8 10. Bc4 Qb4 11. Qf1 Qe7 12. Qe2 Nxd4 13. Nxd4 Rxd4 14. Be3 Rxd1+ 15. Rxd1 Qb4 16. Bxa7 Bc5 17. a3 Qa5 18. Bxc5 Qxc5 19. b4 Qe7 20. Bd5 Nxd5 21. Nxd5 Qh4 22. Qe5 Qh6+ 23. Ne3 Qf6 24. Qxf6 gxf6 25. Kb2 f5 26. Rd4 h5 27. g3 b6 28. h3 Bc6 29. Rh4 f6 30. Kb3 Rd8 31. Kc3 Rh8 32. g4 f4 33. Nc4 Be8 34. a4 Bxa4 35. Rxh5 Rxh5 36. gxh5 Be8 37. h6 Bg6 38. Na3 Kd7 39. Kd2 e5 40. Nb5 c6 41. Na3 Ke6 42. Nc4 b5 43. Na5 Kd5 44. c4+ bxc4 45. Kc3 Bf5 46. Nxc4 Ke6 47. Na5 Kd5 48. Nb7 Bh7 49. Kd2 Bg8 50. Ke2 Ke6 51. Na5 Kd6 52. Kd3 Kd5 53. Kc3 Bh7 54. Kd2 Bf5 55. Nb7 Ke6 56. Ke2 Kd5 57. Kf3 Bg6 58. Kg4 Ke6 59. Na5 Kd6 60. Kf3 Bh5+ 61. Kg2 Bg6 62. f3 Kd5 63. Kf2 Bh7 64. Ke2 Bf5 65. Nb7 Ke6 66. Kd2 Ke7 67. Na5 Kd6 68. Kc3 Bg6 69. Kb2 Kc7 70. Nc4 Kd7 71. Kc1 Ke6 72. Kd2 Bf5 73. Ke2 Bh7 74. Na5 Kd6 75. Nb7+ Kc7 76. Nc5 Kd6 77. Nb3 Bf5 78. Kf2 Ke6 79. Na5 Kd6 80. Ke1 Bb1 81. Nc4+ Ke6 82. Kd1 Kf7 83. Na5 Ba2 84. Nxc6 Bd5 85. Nd8+ Kg6 86. Ke2 Kxh6 87. Kf2 Kh5 88. b5 Kh4 89. Kg2 e4 90. b6 exf3+ 91. Kf2 Kxh3 92. b7 Bxb7 93. Nxb7 Kg4 94. Nd6 Kg5 95. Nb5 Kg6 96. Nd4 Kf7 97. Kxf3 1/2-1/2

Fire 6.1 (3113)
Bobcat 8 (2891)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
18
2017.11.01
A80
Dutch: 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bg5 d5

1. d4 f5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Bg5 d5 4. Nf3 a6 5. e3 e6 6. g4 fxg4 7. Ne5 c5 8. Nxg4 Be7 9. dxc5 O-O 10. Nxf6+ Bxf6 11. Bxf6 Qxf6 12. Qd2 Nd7 13. O-O-O Nxc5 14. f4 b6 15. Bg2 Bb7 16. Kb1 Bc6 17. h4 Nb7 18. Ne2 Nd6 19. Rhg1 Rae8 20. Nd4 Bb7 21. Nf3 a5 22. Ne5 Qe7 23. h5 Nf7 24. Ng4 Nd6 25. Bf1 Nf5 26. Bd3 Qc7 27. Ne5 Rf6 28. c4 dxc4 29. Bxc4 Kh8 30. Ka1 Rff8 31. Qh2 Re7 32. Bd3 Nh6 33. Bb1 Ng8 34. h6 gxh6 35. Rg3 a4 36. Qh4 Bd5 37. Rdg1 Ref7 38. e4 Bc4 39. Qh2 Re7 40. Qg2 Nf6 41. Nxc4 Qc6 42. Ne5 Qe8 43. Qh2 Ng8 1-0

Arasan 20.2 (2741)
Rybka 4.1 (3102)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
19
2017.11.02
C00
French: Chigorin, 2…c5

1. e4 e6 2. Qe2 c5 3. d3 Nc6 4. Nf3 d6 5. g3 Be7 6. Bg2 e5 7. Nbd2 Nf6 8. c3 O-O 9. O-O Re8 10. Re1 h6 11. b3 b5 12. d4 cxd4 13. cxd4 Qb6 14. d5 Nb4 15. Nf1 a5 16. a3 Na6 17. b4 Nc7 18. Bd2 axb4 19. axb4 Ra4 20. Rac1 Bd7 21. Rc2 Qb7 22. Nh4 g6 23. Rec1 Na6 24. Rb1 Rc8 25. Rxc8+ Qxc8 26. Ne3 Bd8 27. Qd3 Bb6 28. Nf3 Kg7 29. Ne1 h5 30. Bf3 Ra2 31. Rc1 Qh8 32. N1c2 h4 33. Ra1 Rxa1+ 34. Nxa1 hxg3 35. hxg3 Nh7 36. Nac2 Ng5 37. Nf5+ gxf5 38. Bxg5 f4 39. gxf4 f6 40. fxe5 fxg5 41. e6 Be8 42. Qc3+ Kh7 43. e5 Qf8 44. Be4+ Kg8 45. Qg3 dxe5 46. Qh2 Qe7 47. Qxe5 Bc7 48. Qf5 Bf4 49. Ne3 Bxe3 50. fxe3 Nxb4 51. Qe5 Qg7 52. Qb8 Kf8 53. Qd6+ Qe7 54. Qe5 Qg7 55. Qd6+ Qe7 56. Qe5 Qg7 57. Qd6+ 1/2-1/2

Hakkapeliitta 210416 (2778)
Stockfish 041017 (3227)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
19
2017.11.02
A88
Dutch: Leningrad, Main Line, 7.Nc3 c6

1. d4 f5 2. g3 Nf6 3. c4 g6 4. Nf3 d6 5. Bg2 Bg7 6. O-O O-O 7. Nc3 c6 8. Qb3 Na6 9. Rd1 h6 10. h3 Qe8 11. c5+ d5 12. Bf4 Nd7 13. h4 e5 14. Nxd5 cxd5 15. Qxd5+ Rf7 16. Bxe5 Nxe5 17. Nxe5 Be6 18. Qf3 Bxe5 19. dxe5 Nxc5 20. Qe3 Nd7 21. Bxb7 Rd8 22. Bg2 Nf8 23. Rd6 Rxd6 24. exd6 Qa4 25. b3 Qa6 26. Rd1 Qxa2 27. b4 Qb3 28. Qxb3 Bxb3 29. Rd3 Be6 30. Bc6 Nd7 31. f4 Nb6 32. Kf2 Bd7 33. b5 Kf8 34. Kf3 h5 35. Rc3 Rf6 36. Bxd7 Nxd7 37. Rc6 Re6 38. Kf2 Ke8 39. Kf3 Nf6 40. Ra6 Ne4 41. Rxa7 Rxd6 42. Rb7 Kd8 43. Kg2 Re6 44. Kf3 Nd6 45. Rb6 Kd7 46. Rc6 Nxb5 47. Rc4 Nd6 48. Rc5 Ne4 49. Ra5 Ke7 50. Ra7+ Kf6 51. Ra1 Rb6 52. Ke3 Nxg3 53. Kf3 Ne4 54. Ke3 Rb3+ 55. Kd4 Rh3 56. Ra6+ Kg7 57. Ra7+ 0-1

Rybka 4.1 (3102)
Nemorino 3.04 (2899)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
20
2017.11.03
B00
Owen Defence: 2.d4 Bb7

1. d4 b6 2. e4 Bb7 3. Nc3 e6 4. Bd3 Nf6 5. h3 h6 6. Nge2 d6 7. O-O Be7 8. d5 exd5 9. exd5 O-O 10. Nd4 Nbd7 11. Bb5 Nxd5 12. Nxd5 Bxd5 13. Bc6 Bc4 14. Bxh6 gxh6 15. Qg4+ Kh8 16. Nf5 Bf6 17. Qxc4 Ne5 18. Qf4 Nxc6 19. Qxh6+ Kg8 20. Rae1 Nd4 21. Nxd4 Bxd4 22. Re4 f5 23. Rxd4 Qf6 24. Qxf6 Rxf6 25. Re1 Kg7 26. Rh4 Raf8 27. g3 c6 28. Kg2 c5 29. Kf3 d5 30. Kf4 d4 31. Rh5 R8f7 32. Re8 Rd6 33. Reh8 Re6 34. f3 Kf6 35. Rxf5+ Ke7 36. Rxf7+ Kxf7 37. Rh7+ Ke8 38. Rh5 c4 39. Rd5 Re2 40. Rxd4 Rxc2 41. a4 a6 42. Ke3 b5 43. Rd2 Rc1 44. axb5 axb5 45. h4 Re1+ 46. Re2 Rd1 47. g4 Kf7 48. h5 Rd8 49. f4 b4 50. g5 b3 51. Kf3 Rd1 52. Kg4 Kf8 53. h6 Rh1 54. f5 Rg1+ 1-0

Chiron 040917 (3004)
Ginkgo 2 (3042)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
6
2017.10.20
C24
Bishop’s Opening: Paulsen, 4.Nf3

1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 Nf6 3. d3 c6 4. Nf3 d5 5. Bb3 Bd6 6. exd5 cxd5 7. O-O Nc6 8. Bg5 Be6 9. c4 d4 10. Nbd2 O-O 11. Rc1 Be7 12. Re1 Nd7 13. Ne4 Bf5 14. Bxe7 Qxe7 15. Ba4 f6 16. Nfd2 Nc5 17. Nxc5 Qxc5 18. a3 Ne7 19. b4 Qc7 20. c5 Kh8 21. Qf3 Be6 22. Bb3 Bxb3 23. Nxb3 Qd7 24. Nd2 Nd5 1/2-1/2

This game may not have been played. Found it under the Johnny-Houdini game Nov 3. Clicked refresh and then obtained actual game.

Andscacs 0.92 (3094)
Fizbo 1.91 (2899)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
21
2017.11.04
B10
Caro-Kann: Breyer Variation

1. e4 c6 2. d3 d5 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. e5 Ng8 5. Be2 Bf5 6. O-O e6 7. d4 a5 8. b3 Ne7 9. c4 Bg6 10. Nh4 Nd7 11. Nc3 Nf5 12. Nxf5 Bxf5 13. g4 Bg6 14. f4 Bb4 15. Na4 f5 16. a3 Be7 17. Be3 b6 18. Nc3 Rc8 19. Rf2 O-O 20. g5 Bf7 21. Bf3 Be8 22. h4 h6 23. Raa2 g6 24. Rh2 h5 25. Rhf2 Rf7 26. Qc1 Nf8 27. Rfc2 a4 28. bxa4 dxc4 29. Qb1 Qc7 30. Be2 Qa7 31. Bxc4 Bd8 32. Qb3 Rfc7 33. Rc1 Rb8 34. Be2 Rcc8 35. Bf2 Qa8 36. Bf3 Qa6 37. Qb1 b5 38. Qd3 Qa5 39. Qd1 Be7 40. Raa1 Rc7 41. Kg2 Rcc8 42. Kg3 Kg7 43. Be1 Qb6 44. Qd3 Kg8 45. axb5 cxb5 46. Bf2 Qa5 47. d5 Bc5 48. Be3 Bxe3 49. Qxe3 Rc4 50. Ne2 Nd7 51. dxe6 Nc5 52. Bd5 Ne4+ 53. Kg2 Rxc1 54. e7+ Bf7 55. e6 Be8 56. Rxc1 b4 57. Bxe4 fxe4 58. axb4 Qxb4 59. Qc3 Qb7 60. Qc7 Qb2 61. Kf2 Kh7 62. Rc3 Rb3 63. Qe5 Rxc3 64. Qxc3 Qb1 65. Qf6 Qb6+ 66. Kg2 Qa6 67. Ng3 e3 68. Kh3 e2 69. Qe5 Qa3 70. Qxe2 Kg8 71. Qe5 Qb4 72. Qc7 Kh7 73. Qd8 Qb5 74. Qd4 Qa6 75. Qe5 Qa4 1-0

Arasan 20.2 (2741)
Laser 200917 (2660)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
21
2017.11.04
A80
Dutch: 2.Nc3 Nf6

1. d4 f5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Bf4 d6 4. Nf3 c6 5. e3 Nh5 6. Bc4 Nxf4 7. exf4 b5 8. Bb3 a5 9. a3 d5 10. O-O Nd7 11. Nxd5 cxd5 12. Bxd5 Ra6 13. Qe2 Rf6 14. Rfe1 Ba6 15. Ng5 Nb6 16. Be6 Qc7 17. a4 Bb7 18. axb5 h6 19. Qe5 Qd6 20. Qxd6 exd6 21. Bd5+ Kd8 22. Bxb7 hxg5 23. Bc6 a4 24. b3 Rfh6 25. h3 Be7 26. bxa4 d5 27. a5 Nc8 28. Bxd5 gxf4 29. b6 Bd6 30. c4 Re8 31. Rxe8+ Kxe8 32. a6 Bb8 33. a7 Bxa7 34. bxa7 Nxa7 35. Rxa7 Rd6 1-0

Nemorino 3.04 (2899)
Fire 6.1 (3113)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
21
2017.11.04
A80
Dutch: 2.Nf3

1. d4 f5 2. Nf3 g6 3. Bf4 Bg7 4. e3 d6 5. Nc3 Nf6 6. Bc4 e6 7. a3 O-O 8. Ba2 a5 9. h4 Qe8 10. Qe2 Kh8 11. Bc4 Bd7 12. Nb5 Na6 13. O-O-O h6 14. Bh2 Ng4 15. Bg3 e5 16. dxe5 dxe5 17. Nh2 Nf6 18. Nf3 Ne4 19. Ng5 Nxg3 20. fxg3 e4 21. Nh3 Nc5 22. Nf4 Bxb5 23. Bxb5 c6 24. Bc4 h5 25. Rd6 Rf6 26. Rd4 b5 27. Ba2 b4 28. Rhd1 Kh7 29. Qc4 Qe5 30. c3 bxa3 31. bxa3 Qe7 32. Kc2 Rb8 33. a4 Kh6 34. R1d2 Rb7 35. Kd1 Nd7 36. Qa6 Ne5 37. Qa8 Ng4 38. Rd8 Nxe3+ 39. Ke2 Ng4 40. Ne6 e3 41. Rc2 Rxe6 42. Bxe6 Nf6 43. Rh8+ Bxh8 44. Qxh8+ Nh7 45. Qe5 Nf6 46. Qxe3+ Kg7 47. Bc8 Nd5 48. Qxe7+ Rxe7+ 49. Kf3 Re3+ 50. Kf2 Rxc3 51. Rxc3 Nxc3 52. Bb7 Nxa4 53. Bxc6 Nc5 54. Ke3 a4 55. Kd2 Ne4+ 56. Kc2 a3 57. Be8 Nxg3 58. Bb5 f4 59. Bc4 Nf5 60. Kb1 Nxh4 61. Ba2 0-1

Gaviota 1.01 (2757)
Stockfish 041017 (3227)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
21
2017.11.04
A88
Dutch: Leningrad, Main Line, 7.Nc3 c6 8.Qc2

1. d4 f5 2. c4 Nf6 3. Nf3 g6 4. Nc3 Bg7 5. g3 d6 6. Bg2 O-O 7. O-O c6 8. Qc2 Na6 9. a3 Qe8 10. Rd1 e5 11. d5 cxd5 12. Nxd5 Nxd5 13. Rxd5 e4 14. Nd4 Nc7 15. Rxd6 Qe7 16. c5 Ne8 17. Qc4+ Kh8 18. Rd5 Nc7 19. Rd6 Ne8 20. Rd5 Nc7 21. Rd6 Ne8 1/2-1/2

Laser 200917 (2660)
Nemorino 3.04 (2899)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
22
2017.11.05
A03
Bird: Lasker, 3…e6

1. f4 d5 2. e3 Nf6 3. Nf3 e6 4. Be2 c5 5. b3 Be7 6. O-O O-O 7. Bb2 b6 8. c4 Bb7 9. Na3 Ne8 10. Qb1 Nc6 11. Kh1 a6 12. f5 Bf6 13. fxe6 fxe6 14. cxd5 exd5 15. Ng5 Bxg5 16. Rxf8+ Kxf8 17. Qxh7 Ke7 18. Rf1 Kd7 19. Rf7+ Be7 20. Qh5 Kc7 21. Be5+ Nd6 22. Bg3 b5 23. Qxd5 Kb6 24. Rxe7 Nxe7 25. Qxd6+ Qxd6 26. Bxd6 Rd8 27. Nxb5 axb5 28. Bxe7 Rxd2 29. Bf3 c4 30. bxc4 bxc4 31. e4 c3 32. h4 c2 33. Ba3 Rd1+ 34. Kh2 Kb5 35. Kg3 Ka4 36. Bb2 Rb1 37. Bxg7 c1=Q 38. Bf6 0-1

Texel 1.07a35 (2965)
Fire 6.1 (3113)
TCEC Season 10 – Stage 1
23
2017.11.06
B10
Caro-Kann: 2.Ne2

1. e4 c6 2. Ne2 e5 3. d4 Nf6 4. dxe5 Nxe4 5. Be3 d5 6. Nd2 Nc5 7. g3 Nbd7 8. f4 f6 9. b4 Na4 10. e6 Ndb6 11. f5 Nb2 12. Qb1 N6c4 13. Nxc4 Nxc4 14. Bd4 Na3 15. Qd1 Bxb4+ 16. c3 Bd6 17. Nf4 O-O 18. Bd3 b6 19. O-O c5 20. Be3 Bb7 21. Rf2 Qe7 22. Ng6 Qc7 23. Nxf8 d4 24. Bf4 Qc6 25. Qf3 Qxf3 26. Rxf3 Bxf8 27. Rf2 c4 28. Bf1 dxc3 29. Re1 Bb4 30. Bc1 b5 31. Rd1 Nb1 32. Rd7 Bc6 33. Bg2 Bxd7 34. Bxa8 Be8 35. Rg2 Kf8 36. Kf2 Ke7 37. g4 Ba3 38. Be3 b4 39. Be4 Nd2 40. Bc5+ Kd8 41. Bc2 Bc6 42. Ke3 b3 43. Rxd2+ cxd2 44. Bxa3 bxc2 45. Kxd2 Bf3 46. g5 fxg5 47. Kxc2 Be4+ 48. Kc3 Bxf5 49. e7+ Kd7 50. Kxc4 a6 51. Kd4 Bb1 52. Bc1 h6 53. Ba3 Bxa2 54. Bb4 Bb1 55. Kd5 Ke8 56. Kd6 Ba2 57. Bc3 g6 58. Bf6 g4 59. Bg7 h5 60. Bf6 a5 61. Kc5 Bf7 62. Kd4 a4 63. Kc3 a3 64. Kc2 Kd7 65. Kd2 a2 66. Kc1 Ke6 67. Bg7 0-1

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Will Confusion Be Our Epitaph

In his post Confusion about Facts dated 15 February 2015, Mark Weeks writes, “Despite some confusion about facts that I happen to know something about, i.e,

‘first played in Afghanistan back in 600 AD’ • ‘Dr. Robert Ferguson (a cardiologist at the Northeast Georgia Diagnostics Clinic)’; • ‘Grandmaster Chess Research Project […] collaborative effort between Israel’s University of Haifa and Grandmaster Boris Delfand’, (sic)…”

Mark provides a link to an article, Does Playing Chess Make You Smarter? on the Examined Existance website (http://examinedexistence.com/does-playing-chess-make-you-smarter/), where one finds this:

Chess sharpens critical thinking skills.

“In his 1995 study titled Chess in Education: Research Summary, Dr. Robert Ferguson (a cardiologist at the Northeast Georgia Diagnostics Clinic) had established that chess is instrumental in the enhancement of a child’s critical thinking and good judgment skills. Ferguson’s subjects, who were seventh to ninth graders, yielded a 17% improvement in the results.”

A picture of Dr. Ferguson’s is prominently displayed on the home page of the NGDC. (http://www.ngdc.com/) His study, which took place from 1979-1983, is featured in any discussion relating to chess “improving” the intelligence of children. The problem is that it has been discredited.

Unfortunately, this kind of thing happens all the time. A newspaper prints an attention grabbing headline about something negative about a person on the front page, then places a retraction on a page in the rear of the next day’s paper which hardly anyone reads. Time passes and the only thing left in the memory is the headline. The mistake is rarely acknowledged, unless it is as egregious as was the mistake made by former chess GM Kenneth Rogoff. See: “The Rogoff-Reinhart data scandal reminds us economists aren’t gods,” by Heidi Moore (http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/apr/18/rogoff-reinhart-deficit-research-false); “Reinhart, Rogoff… and Herndon: The student who caught out the profs,” By Ruth Alexander, BBC News (http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-22223190); “The Reinhart and Rogoff Controversy: A Summing Up,” (http://www.newyorker.com/news/john-cassidy/the-reinhart-and-rogoff-controversy-a-summing-up); “Ken Rogoff, Author Of Discredited Austerity Research, Angrily Blasts Keynesians,” by
Mark Gongloff…This one begins, “Kenneth Rogoff is mad as hell, and he’s not going to take it any more.” Unfortunately for the former GM, he has had to continue to take it…(http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/05/23/ken-rogoff-keynesians_n_3325865.html?); “How the Case for Austerity Has Crumbled,” by Paul Krugman (http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2013/jun/06/how-case-austerity-has-crumbled/); “Republicans’ Favorite National-Debt Researchers Are Now Even More Discredited,” By Danny Vinik (http://www.newrepublic.com/article/116664/imf-study-futher-discredits-reinhart-rogoff-debt-study-austerity). There is much more and it can be found using any search engine by typing in, “Ken Rogoff discredited,” but this will suffice for now because I do not wish to make the former chess GM any madder than he already seems to be…

In the paper Educational benefits of chess instruction: A critical review, Fernand Gobet and Guillermo Campitelli write:

3.2.4.1 Teaching the fourth “R” (Reasoning) through chess; (Ferguson,
undated-b)7
(7 This study is referred to as “Developing critical and creative thinking through chess” in Ferguson
(undated-a).

“This project, which took place from 1979 to 1983, aimed at providing
stimulating experiences fostering the development of critical and creative thinking.
Participants were gifted students (with an IQ equal to or higher than 130) in grades 7
through 9, in the Bradford (PA) area school district. They chose among a variety of
special activities such as chess, dungeons and dragons, Olympics of mind, problem
solving with computers, creative writing, and independent study. Each group met
once a week for 32 weeks.
Participants were tested with alternate forms of the Watson-Glaser Critical
Thinking Appraisal test (CTA) and of the Torrance test of creative thinking, both at
the beginning and at the end of the year. Results for the CTA showed that the chess
group significantly outperformed the non-chess groups (p < .001), the computer group
(p < .003), and the non-participants (p < .025). With the Torrance test of creative
thinking, the chess group showed statistically significant improvement in “fluency,”
“flexibility” and “originality” when they were compared to the population norms and
the non-chess groups. There was also a significant difference in “fluency” and “originality” (but not in “flexibility”) for the chess group compared to the computer
group.
Ferguson used a pretest and posttest design and used more than one control
group, each carrying out activities other than chess. However, this study has an
important weakness that rules out any interpretation of the results in terms of the
contribution of chess training to critical thinking and creativity: students switched
activities either quarterly or semi-annually, and chess players participated in other
activities as well. Therefore, we do not know whether the improvement is due to chess
treatment or to the other treatments. Another limitation of this study is that it
investigated a gifted population; hence, the claims cannot be generalized to the entire
population of school students. Finally, the sample was rather small (15 students in
the school chess club)."

As a baseball Sabermetrician I know all about a small sample size; it is worthless. In the fifth game of the 1969 MLB season Don Bosch, from San Francisco, playing for the expansion Montreal Expos in their very first season, went 4 for 5, leaving his batting average for the young season a robust .571! Don had played for the Asheville Tourists in the AA Southern League in 1964 & 65, then with Columbus and Jacksonville in the AAA International League from 1966-68, and he was called one of the very best center fielders to have ever worn a glove. His problem was his hitting ability did not measure up to his defensive ability. Don had 121 plate appearances in 1969 and hit .179, which happened to be his highest batting average of any MLB season. He ended his career way below the Mendoza line at a robust without the "ro" of .164 in 346 PA's.

It pains me to have to write this about my fellow Georgian, who has, no doubt, done great things in his long life, but honesty compels me to acknowledge citing his study does a disservice to chess. To quote a discredited study, such as this, is dishonest. People do this all the time. For example, the Bushwhackers quoted bogus documents that "… seem to depict an attempt made by Saddam Hussein in Iraq to purchase yellowcake uranium powder from Niger during the Iraq disarmament crisis." (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Niger_uranium_forgeries#Wilson_and_Plame) The Bushwhackers did this while knowing what they were saying was a lie because, "Retired ambassador Joseph C. Wilson wrote a critical op-ed in The New York Times in which he explained the nature of the documents and the government's prior knowledge of their unreliability for use in a case for war. Shortly after Wilson's op-ed, in a column by Robert Novak, in pondering why a State Dept employee was dispatched rather than a trained CIA agent, the identity of Wilson's wife, CIA analyst Valerie Plame, was revealed. The Senate Intelligence Committee report and other sources confirm that Plame "offered his name up" to her superiors." (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Niger_uranium_forgeries#Wilson_and_Plame)
They tried to discredit Ambassador Joseph C. Wilson by outing his wife, which is a violation of Federal law, and still, no one has been prosecuted. This was despicable! Any man who would do such a thing is NOT MUCH OF A MAN!

If the chess community is going to tell parents the game of chess will increase the intelligence of their child, the least we can do is to be honest about the facts.

Black Atlanta Kings Member Denied Ga Open Entry

Thinking the match between the Kings and Ospreys began at seven I was early in arriving at Emory University, where the Kings play. The first player to arrive was Expert Lawrence White, who was to play his first game as a King. Mr. White is a tall, large man with a huge smile, which was on display when he noticed me. He is an intelligent, educated, likable person whose comportment while at the House of Pain was always that of a gentleman.After purchasing a snack, which would substitute for dinner, as he had come directly from work, Lawrence walked over to say hello.
I have known Lawrence since he first appeared at the Atlanta Chess Center in 1997. He is a friendly gentleman and a talented chess player, who is obviously serious about his game. During our conversation I was taken aback when he said he was refused entry to the recent Georgia Open. “What?” I exclaimed, and asked Lawrence to elaborate. He explained, “The registration was from eight AM until eight-thirty and I arrived just before the closing time. I saw Fun Fong standing on something giving a speech, so I found his assistant and told him I would like to enter. He looked at his watch and said it was eight-thirty two. My watch showed eight-thirty.”
It took me a few moments to wrap my head around what I had just heard. Gathering myself, I asked the name of the person he had encountered. Lawrence did not know his name, but after describing the man I said, “That was not an assistant, but the Chief TD, Ben Johnson.” Rather than making waves, Lawrence decided he would not play in the event.
Realizing something like this would never have occurred when the GCA held their events at the House of Pain, I apologized. “Why are you apologizing?” he asked, “I know you would not have done it.” He was correct because just a few years ago every accommodation was made to allow a player, any player, to participate in a GCA event held at the House of Pain. What I did not tell Lawrence, who happens to be an American of African descent, was that I immediately thought of something my friend Mr. William A. Scott, an Expert player back when there were only a few players rated over 2000, publisher of the Atlanta Daily World, a well-respected Black newspaper, and a member of the first incarnation of the Atlanta Kings, told me many decades ago when he said, “Mike, the difference between us is that to Negroes, everything is considered racial, while to White people nothing is race related.” I have heard this many times during my life and have always tried to keep it in mind in my relations with my fellow humans who happen to have been born with a darker skin pigmentation, for I know that when that skin is removed there is no difference in the human body.
I have no idea what was in the mind of Ben Johnson when he denied entry to Mr. Lawrence White. As far as I know it could have been GM Michael Rohde, who has played in Atlanta previously, asking to enter the tournament and Ben, a member of what has become known as the “Know Nothing” party who has taken control of chess in Georgia, would not have known him from Adam. I have no idea how much race played in the Chief TD’s decision. What I do know is that Ben Johnson saw a rather large Black man standing there and the pairings had already been made, so he refused to go to the trouble of making new pairings, something made quick and simple with the advent of the computer pairing programs.
Appalled at the whole situation, I asked Lawrence if I could quote him on the blog and he said, “Sure.”
There were only a few higher rated adults entered and Mr. White would have added stature to the Georgia Open, something completely lost on Ben Johnson. Who is Ben Johnson? I have come to think of him as the “Weird Hockey Guy” of chess. The Legendary Georgia Ironman shuddered at the mention of this, and this is why. Tim and I were doing sports memorabilia shows in the 90’s before the collapse of the card market. During one show a goofy fellow appeared at our table, asking if we would like to purchase a large box of unopened Hockey cards. I had no interest, but the Ironman engaged the rather strange fellow in conversation. Weird Hockey Guy told Tim he had absolutely no interest in the pieces of cardboard of any type. “I am in it only for the money.” In the best capitalist tradition the Weird Hockey Guy would “buy low and sell high.” With the possibility of the MLB strike looming and the encounter with the WHG in mind, I decided to sell everything and get out of the business because it was obvious the card market bubble had burst.
When first meeting Ben Johnson he said, “I don’t know anything about real chess; I come from the scholastic side.” Not only did he try to argue with me about what constituted stalemate, but he also said, “I’m in chess only for the money.” It was obvious I had met the Weird Chess Guy.
Ben Johnson is the Vice President of the Georgia Chess Association. The Ironman mentioned recently that Ben Johnson had organized a one day camp for children in which he would collect $90 for each child from the parents of 30 children. Ben is rated 647. Please note that as Chief TD of the Ga Open Ben Johnson played a rated game during the final round, which he won. Once this game is rated Ben will reach the stratospheric heights of, for Ben, 697.
In his forward to the wonderful book, “The Stress of Chess…and its Infinite Finesse,” by GM Walter Browne, IM Danny Kopec writes, “There is simply no reasonable living to be made in chess in this country…”
“Instead we encourage mediocrity and top players are often left in the cold. By mediocrity, I mean situations like players who have barely reached expert level (or below) making a reasonable regular salary teaching in schools, while the great players, analysts and writers must struggle to make ends meet.”

Bob Dylan Only a Pawn in Their Game March on Washington 1963

http://www.eyeneer.com/video/rock/bob-dylan/only-a-pawn-in-their-game

The Psychology of Chess

It is difficult for a woodpusher to write about the game of chess played by the best human players because, as Bob Dylan wrote, “The game is the same—it’s just on a different level.” (Po’ Boy by Bob Dylan- http://www.bobdylan.com/us/songs/po-boy)

We try our best to understand but from being around those at, or near, the top, it is apparent their understanding is on a higher level. The same can be said about any other game, or sport, I suppose, yet many, if not most, of the greatest writers in the history of baseball never played in the show, and some never played the game on any level. Former MLB player Harold Reynolds had the audacity to tell one famous writer that since he had not played baseball in the major league he could not understand the game. Harold has a right to his opinion only because he did play in the show. After hearing the callous remark I thought there might be some merit to his argument, but that the accomplished writer could have a different understanding of the game.

I can still recall a time when IM Boris Kogan, at a tournament in Florida, knew he would face Mr. Six-Time, GM Walter Browne, in the next round having the black pieces. Boris was lamenting the fact that he had no chance. This left the Legendary Georgia Ironman and I flummoxed. We were having a difficult time understanding his defeatist attitude. “You not understand,” Boris kept saying, “Cannot beat him. He too strong now.” Granted, Walter was at the top of his game, and was much younger than Boris, but still…we had a difficult time wrapping our minds around seeing Boris in that condition. Boris lost that game. The players at the top do not need numbers to know chess strength.

“From London to Elista: The Inside Story of the World Chess Championship Matches that Vladimir Kramnik Won Against Garry Kasparov, Peter Leko, and Veselin Topalov,” by Evgeny Bareev and Ilya Levitov is a magnificent book. It won the English Chess Federation 2008 Book-of-the-Year Award. The Gorilla is showing a new copy priced at $221.42; a used copy will set you back $55.00. I am holding on to mine. After reviewing the 7th match game for the World Championship between Peter Leko and Vladimir Kramnik there is a discussion of chess psychology which begins with my all-time favorite quote about Bobby Fischer. “When you’re playing Fischer, the question isn’t whether or not you’ll win; the question is whether or not you’ll survive.” The quote is from the man Bobby vanquished, Boris Spassky.
“SMYSLOV explained to us: ‘It was difficult for me to play Geller for a simple reason-when we sat down at the board, hatred was written on his face, he was ready to destroy his opponent. And if someone fell into that kind of condition, I couldn’t play.”

Geller had a lifetime plus score against Bobby Fischer. Reflecting on this made me wonder about how a player as strong as Hikaru Nakamura is considered Human World Champion Magnus Carlsen’s “regular customer.” Magnus has beaten Hikaru like a drum, with a lifetime score of 11 wins without a defeat in the only games that count, what is now called “classical” games. How is this possible?

“LEVITOV: But now, in my opinion, all chess players have become highly-qualified psychologists, and they don’t use only chess methods in their battles. Let’s take Kasparov. It’s said that he put pressure on his opponents psychologically-he exuded such a supply of negative energy that they felt like resigning immediately. Bareev once described to me very amusingly how in time trouble Kasparov started shaking his head and making tragic grimaces, as if to say, ‘how can this be, I’ve missed such a simple idea!’ And his opponent sits and desperately tries to work out if he’s being toyed with, and his clock is ticking…In other words, you have to solve psychological problems as well as chess problems during a game.”

Has Hikaru Nakamura lost the psychological battle? Has Magnus gotten into Hikaru’s head? What else can explain such a score?

Levitov poses a question for Bareev, “Does your opponent’s energy have a strong influence on the chess player? Why, for example, did Shirov and Anand always lose to Kasparov, why did Fischer play badly against Geller, and why can’t Polgar play against Kramnik?”

Bareev answers, “It’s genuinely unknown why it’s easier to play one opponent than another, and there are also metaphysical explanations for this-a powerful energy, and unfamiliar style and so on. More often everything simply depends on the playing strengths of blondes and brunettes and their preparedness for the specific encounter. In other words, you have to investigate every specific case separately.”
“LEVITOV: How do you control your emotions, how do you avoid showing that your opponent has surprised you horribly, for example, with his choice of opening? Does everyone have their own acting methods?”
“BAREEV: To a certain extent. People sometimes get ideas on this from the good results of new players. Later they adapt their openings and style of play and stop reacting to the unexpected. It’s better to combine your acting talents with specific skills and abilities.”

After seeing the following parody on the blog of GM Kevin Spraggett (http://kevinspraggettonchess.wordpress.com/), the best chess blog on the internet, I could not help but wonder how much acting went into the lessons given by former World Chess Champion Garry Kasparov to current Human World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen. What part do histrionics play in the psychology of chess?

HMS – SjakkVM – Magnus Carlsen parodi

Classical Chess

“Bill James is the best known baseball analyst in the world” (http://sabr.org/about/bill-james). Bill began his writing career by questioning the assumptions in baseball, something commonly called, “The Book.” For questioning some of the commonly held beliefs in baseball Bill was excoriated by the MLB establishment. His books, and the thinking contained therein, caught on with many and his books became very successful. Many other baseball fans began to question things like the sacrifice bunt, held dear by the MLB establishment. Decades later Bill was hired by the Boston Red Sox as an analyst and the Red Sox became the World Champions. Now every MLB team has an analyst, or team of analysts.

Bill’s latest book is, “Fools Rush Inn: More Detours on the Way to Conventional Wisdom.” One of the essays is, “Classical Sport.” As is often the case, while reading the essay my thoughts would drift to chess and I would substitute the word “chess” for “classical music.” Read on and you will understand why.

Bill writes, “Classical music has very, very serious problems as an industry. The number of people who enjoy classical music is small compared to the market for other kinds of music and the market is composed primarily of old people.

“Classical music survives, or has survived so far, because it has advantages over the marketplace, rather than advantage in the marketplace. Classical music is perceived by a very large cadre of musical professionals as the highest form of music, and these people have integrated themselves and their music into the society in ways that insulate it from extinction by economic forces. High schools do not teach young musicians to play rock and roll, as a rule; they teach them to play “instruments,” which are in truth the instruments of classical music. Millions of small children take violin lessons, which their parents get for them because this is how music is taught. The perception that this form of music is “classy” -widely accepted in our culture- keeps the form alive by giving it these advantages, and many similar and related advantages. At the symphony I am below the median age and, I suspect, well below the median income. Those old people who go to the symphony have more-than proportional power because they have more-than proportional wealth. There is something much more than that going on here. It has to do with the perception of rectitude, of value and of virtue.”

“Music, like sport, is instinctive to us, exists in all cultures, and will never disappear. There are primal and sophisticated forms of music and of sport, which could also be called vibrant and calcified, or youthful and moribund. There is a spectrum in these activities that runs from vibrant, primal and youthful to sophisticated, calcified and moribund. All sports and all forms of music move across that spectrum, crawling toward obsolescence.”

I have always thought of chess as a form of the “Glass Bead Game,” made popular by the greatest novel ever written, “The Glass Bead Game,” also published as “Magister Ludi,” Latin for “Master of the Game,” by Hermann Hesse, who won a Nobel Prize in Literature for the book. The Glass Bead Game takes place centuries into the future. It concerns the place the game occupies in the culture. “As the novel progresses, Knecht begins to question his loyalty to the order; he gradually comes to doubt that the intellectually gifted have a right to withdraw from life’s big problems. Knecht comes to see Castalia as a kind of ivory tower, an ethereal and protected community, devoted to pure intellectual pursuits but oblivious to the problems posed by life outside its borders.” (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Glass_Bead_Game)

The game of chess can be thought of in the way Bill James writes of classical music. Chess has always been thought of as important because it requires thought, something some very wealthy people have valued highly enough to become patrons of the game. I am thinking of Gregor Piatigorsky and his wife, Jacqueline, and the famous tournaments they funded in Los Angeles in 1963 and 1966, called the Piatigorsky Cup. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piatigorsky_Cup) Every chess player knows of these tournaments, and if you encounter anyone involved with chess who has never heard of the Piatigorsky tournaments the question becomes, “What is this person doing in chess?” In 1961 the Piatigorsky’s sponsored a match between Bobby Fischer and Sammy Reshevsky. It ended prematurely when the wealthy couple wanted to change the scheduled time of one of the games because of a conflict Gregor had with a musical performance. Bobby refused because he had signed a contract that specified the round time of each game. The wealthy couple must have felt like Ronald Raygun, when running for POTUS, and he was heckled from the audience. Ronnie famously yelled, “I am paying for this microphone!” In actuality he was not paying. The people contributing money toward his campaign were paying, but why quibble? It was a great sound bite for the Gypper. The Piatigorsky’s were paying and thought Bobby should jump through any hoop provided. Bobby provided them with what is called a “rude awakening” when he “just said no.” Extraordinarily wealthy people are not used to being refused. They are also not used to being told “no” because they surround themselves with “yes men.”
I mention this because without the patronage of very wealthy people there may not be future chess as we have known it until now. Consider for a moment the state of chess without the largess provided by the latest patron, billionaire Rex Sinquefield. Rather than being held in the state of the art St. Louis Chess Club & Scholastic Center the US Championships may have been held in some room in a college, as has been the case previously. The STLCC&SC is an artificial construct. I mean that because St. Louis was never known as a hot-bed of chess in the way New York city was known to be a hot-bed of chess. The game of chess developed naturally in New York, San Francisco, and other cities without some fantastically wealthy individual building it so they would come. Please do not take me wrong; I am not saying this is a bad thing, just that it is a “thing.”

Chess is in a fight for its life in the marketplace. The common perception among adults is that chess is dead, and that it died when the computer program “defeated” human World Chess Champ Garry Kasparov. In order to survive chess has been “sold” as a wonderful game to help children “think.” Chess is a wonderful tool to help children learn how to think, but so are literature and math The game of Wei-Chi, popularly known as “Go” in the west, is also a wonderful game and in many ways it is better than chess because a computer program is not yet as strong as the best human players (I will discuss this in a planned future post). Go is exponentially more complicated than chess and it is much simpler to learn, with no “weird” moves such as castling or en passant. A draw in go is about as common as leap year. One of the major problems afflicting chess is non-serious games. It will be terribly difficult to explain the worth of a game in which he is asked to contribute after being shown a game such as the one played today in the British Championship:

Pert, Richard G – Pert, Nicholas
101st ch-GBR 2014 Aberystwyth WLS (8.2), 2014.07.27
1.e4 e5 ½-½

To those who may say they are related I say, “Go talk to Venus and Serena Williams.” To those who may say it is near the end of the Championship and they were tired I say, “It is only one game per day and the previous day was an OFF DAY!”

In reply to the post “Has Cheating Affected Chess?” my friend the Discman sent me an email in which he wrote, “Interesting discussion and on point. However, cheating isn’t the biggest problem facing chess. Computers have taken the mystery out of the game. GM’s used to be gods with almost super-natural powers. Now any schmo with a smartphone can figure out the best move. Technology and the public’s need for instant gratification have left chess behind. It is no longer relevant in the public consciousness. Yes, cheating and the potential of cheating are contributing factors, but not the root cause.”

Chris has hit the nail on the head. The Royal game no longer has mystique. Most adults without children consider chess an anachronism, much in the same way they think of the game of checkers, a hugely popular game once upon a time. Consider these comments, first from Ron Suarez on the USCF forum: “We have seen a big drop in adult participation and membership.” (http://www.uschess.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=23&t=20209&sid=98f50abff42e50fe2fc1e9553255a7cd)
Gary Maltzman wrote this on the NCAA forum: “Seems like some of the big NC Tournaments are on an attendance downswing.” (http://www.ncchess.org/Discussion/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=856&sid=4d93659f883d9f10934dba14bd4e056b)

These kinds of comments proliferate on the web these days.

I have no solution to offer other than those previously written. The chess world has to look toward those in positions of power, for better or worse. A quote attributed to Albert Einstein to mind: “The thinking it took to get us into this mess is not the same thinking that is going to get us out of it.”

GCA Hegemonic Designs

An email making the rounds in the local chess community has reached the AW. The sources are impeccable. It appears the GCA board has decided to hold a chess tournament about every other weekend in the coming year. To set the stage one should know the players in this drama.
The GCA board consists of three women, Laura Doman, Katie Hartley, and Pam Little, who do not play chess; Ben Johnson, who thinks he plays chess; Fun Fong, who plays mediocre chess; and Tim Payne and Frank Johnson, who are, or have been, rated expert. These are the committees found on the GCA website (http://www.georgiachess.org/contact):
GCA Committees
By-Law Task Force: Fun Fong, Katie Hartley, Mike Mulford, Scott Parker, Jeanne Ward
Communications: Laura Doman (Director)
Membership: Parnell Watkins
Open Events: WIM Carolina Blanco (Chair), Frank Johnson, Carolyn Lantelme, Greg Maness, Tim Payne, Bryan Rodeghiero, Thad Rogers, Parnell Watkins
Scholastic: Laura Doman, Katie Hartley (Co-Chair), Tricia Hill, Ben Johnson (Co-Chair), Susan Justice, Tim Payne, Steve Schneider, Ted Wieber
Volunteer Coordinator: Frank Johnson
Web Team: Laura Doman, Katie Hartley, Vijay Jayaram, Jagadeesh Rathnasabapathy, Keith Sewell
Committee members are volunteers who can commit to a year of working on the team.
In addition there the GCA has a “Task Force”:
GCA By-Law Task Force: Fun Fong (President), Katie Hartley (2nd VP), Mike Mulford (USCF delegate, Past Treasurer), Scott Parker (Past President), Jeanne Ward (Non-profit consultant)
Suggested By-Law Revisions to be voted on June 21st by GCA Members (http://www.georgiachess.org/bylaws)
These are the current “movers and shakers” of the Georgia Chess Association.

The GCA has myriad committees. The President of the GCA, Fun Fong, posted his, “From the President: GCA May 2014 Update” (http://georgiachessnews.com/2014/05/03/from-the-president-gca-may-2014-update/) on the new online magazine, “Georgia Chess News” on May 3, 2014, in which he writes about today’s committees and those to come. I asked two respected chess luminaries, NM Chris Chambers, and former GCA President and Georgia Senior Champion Scott Parker, for their thoughts on the President’s message. This was recieved from the Discman:
Happy Monday Bacon.
“Yes I’m fine with you using my stuff on blogs.
Regarding the GCA message, he sure seems to be planning to put together lots of committees.
Are there even enough dues-paying adult GCA members to man all the spots in those committees?
At this point they’re talking about forming committees to decide how to arrange the deck chairs on the Titanic. Virtually all of the passengers (actual tournament players) have boarded the life boats and are long gone, leaving only the wanna-be TD’s to train each other how to run tournaments that nobody will attend.”
CC
Mr. Parker sent an polished, insightful and obviously well-thought-out reply:
Michael,
“Fun is very high on the concept of working through committees. I am not, nor was my predecessor, Ted Wieber. That doesn’t mean it is wrong. There is more than one way to accomplish a task. My preference, and Ted’s too, I believe, was to find a committed volunteer and put a heavy workload on him/her. Committees tend to be slow and cumbersome things, and they lack direction. Each member wants to pull it in a different direction. You’ve heard the old joke, “A platypus is an animal designed by a committee.” It’s funny because there is an underlying truth to it. Committees do tend to come out with proposals that look like they ordered from a take-out menu – something from column A, something from column B, something from colunmn C, etc.
I’m also not sure that it makes sense to operate through committees in an orgainzation that has about 200 voting members. For USCF, which has over 10,000, that’s one thing, It’s another thing for GCA. We don’t have that many committed volunteers. I prefer to work with a small number of committed people rather than a large number of casually interested people.
All this being said, I will freely admit that I didn’t do a great job of identifying those committed volunteers, and ended up doing way too much of the grunt work myself. I was so busy doing the mundane stuff that I had little time to be President. It’s hard to concentrate on your plan to drain the swamp when you’re up to your a** in aligators. My impression is that as long as I was President that probably wasn’t going to change. As long as I was President and things were getting done a crisis didn’t exist. Without a crisis, not many people jumped up to volunteer. Perhaps in the long run it would have been better if I had refused to do the grunt work and let some tournaments and projects die so that a crisis situation would exist. Maybe that would have stimulated a few volunteers to step forward. For better or worse, I was not willing to do that.
Anyway, Fun’s idea of working through committees seems to be working pretty well for him. There has been some short term dislocation, and not everything is flowing smoothly, but in general the GCA is healthy. His way may not be my way, but if it works for him, that’s all that counts. “It doesn’t matter if the cat is black or white, as long as it catches mice.” – Deng Xiao Ping.
Best Wishes, Scottt
P.S. You have my permission to use any or all of this in any way you see fit, or to copy it to anyone you choose.”

Both of these replies from my friends were received May 12, 2014. Although I tend to agree with the Discman, listening to a person who has the respect of all the chess community, as does Scott Parker, gives one a different perspective. There are always two sides of an issue and one must try, as difficult as it may be, to understand the other side.

Emails are being fired at such a rate the NSA is having trouble keeping up with the heavy volume…The first email is from WIM Carolina Blanco, Georgia Chess Open Event ( Chair).
On Monday, July 7, 2014 6:24 PM, Carolina Blanco wrote:
“Hello Everybody
Please find attached the update information for all the Open event tournaments to be organized by Georgia Chess Association from September 2014-July 2015.
Dates and location were verified according last Board meeting at Emory University on June 21st, 2014. Please note that the flyer still need to pass for one more review correction by the committee however with all these information we can see more organized our goal in maintain the tournaments organized in the past calendar year and adding two more new tournaments and new locations for the convenient and benefits of the chess community.
* Only event missing in this email ( but going to be added) is the Collegiate tournament. I am waiting for Ted Wieber to give us all the information for next year since he is the coordinator for this event.
* Location for Senior’s Open and Women’s Open is TBA since the Rivers Academy and Mrs. Justice proposal are in discussion, however the date that we saw more convenient at the board meeting in June for this event is September 20th, 2014.
* There are 4 tournaments to be held at the Wyndham Galleria Hotel and the dates in the flyer are the one that we are committed in the contract with the except of the Georgia State Championship that instead to be held on May 1st 2015. It was moved to April 18th 2015
* there are 2 new Class championship tournament added on February 27th and July 24th 2015. Beside the Class Championship on November 2014.
We are in the process to contact to Continental chess to try to extend our Open event activity from 6 tournaments a year to 12 tournaments a year for the next calendar period.
Questions?. Please feel free to email me.”
Greetings,
WIM Carolina Blanco
Georgia Chess Open Event ( Chair)

Ms. Blanco’s email evoked this response from former GCA President, International Arbiter, and chess business owner L. Thad Rogers:
On Mon, Jul 7, 2014 at 6:45 PM, thad rogers wrote:
“Why is the Georgia Chess Association trying to put
American Chess Promotions and Championship Chess
out of business.”
I have 6 weekend tournaments scheduled with the dates
with Katie.
The Georgia Chess Association is to support chess in Georgia and not put other chess companies out of business.
This is the only way I try to make a meager income. I guess you all wouldn’t mind it if a nonprofit company came along and put all of your jobs and living out the window in order to satisfy them-selves.
No board in 40 years ever tried to do such a thing. I am very proud of such a caring Georgia Chess Association. I have tried tto do nothing but help the Georgia Chess Association for 40 years.
I have five or six people tell me that Fun said he is trying to put Georgia vendors out of business. If this goes through, then I guess he will get his wish.
All my tournaments are getting to have a signed contract. If Southeast holds tournaments. Then how in the heck can anybody make any money with about 26 weekend tournaments.
Like I said, the GCA Board and Volunteers don’t have to worry because you all aren’t risking any of your personal money. You are using State Association Funds. That is something to be proud of.
Sincerely,
Thad Rogers
American Chess Promotions
I am suppose to be on the Open Events committee. I never hear a word about meetings or issues until after the fact.”

The next email is from the POTGCA:
From: Fun Fong
Date: 07/09/2014 2:49 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: thad rogers
Thad,
“It seems that there’s an unfortunate – and false – rumor circulating that the GCA is looking to put you or any other Georgia chess organization out of business. I can understand why you would be upset. You have a long personal relationship with the GCA, which we all appreciate, and many of our members have enjoyed playing in American Chess tournaments for many years. As president, my mission is to serve the greater chess community by providing a full calendar of quality events for both adult and scholastic members. It is not, nor has it ever been, to destroy another’s livelihood through the power of the GCA. There is absolutely no way that the GCA could put anyone out of business, even if it wanted to, which is certainly no one’s intentions. You will not find any legitimate conversation anywhere that has even hinted of this. Somehow, facts are becoming distorted by the time they get to you, and I am greatly troubled by the prospect of a malicious rumor mill.
It is my belief that more chess is better chess, and that the chess community will eventually expand as opportunities expand, much as have road races greatly expanded in the Metro Atlanta area. GCA does endeavor to raise the bar for quality, so that other organizers will continue to innovate in their offerings, giving the Georgia player more choices and a better selection of events to participate. This initiative should provide a better experience overall for Georgia players. I know that you have been constantly thinking of new events and ways to execute them, and I think this endeavor is working for the benefit of the Georgia player.
Still, it is my responsibility as president to promote chess and to offer our players with as many opportunities to play good competitive chess as the market will support. Besides American Chess and Championship Chess, there is the North Georgia Chess Center, Vibha, and other organizations that host all sorts of tournaments, ranging from afternoon tournaments for young beginners to multi-day events for top-rated competitive players. I believe that there is room for all because we have a large, diverse community of chess players, and tournaments by virtue of their competitive level, time requirements, or location cannot all appeal to all types of players at all times. The chess community today is not the same as it was in the past. As GCA president, I must listen to our members and respond to their demands: to expand, support, and promote opportunities for competitive, quality play.
I understand and respect your concern that an outside group may be stronger or better financed, and potentially threaten your business. We will not tolerate any organization trying to drive another out of business. On the other hand, the GCA will not act as the personal agent for a business seeking to keep others out of their “turf.” I will tell you that the GCA will be advising Continental Chess (or any other organization that we may approach or that approaches us) that we must have a balanced calendar. Similar events need to be coordinated in advance, so that they don’t overlap too often.
The GCA cannot carry out its mission if we are beholden to vendor interests – any vendor. We must maintain the balance of support to our valued vendor organizations with our responsibilities to the chess playing public. If a vendor is involved in a GCA endeavor that could be perceived as a conflict of interest, then the vendor should recuse itself from voting or debate on such an issue. As an example, and I say this with due respect, it seems that whenever the GCA proposes dates in a modest expansion of our programs, we have heard you state that the GCA has no right to do so, presumably because the proposal conflicts with your own business’ plans or calendar. We cannot function as an organization if we cannot maintain impartiality. And under my leadership, this will cease to be a problem.
Thad, I continue to honor and value your long commitment and dedication to the GCA. We are all glad to have you involved and hope that you will want to do so for a long time to come. Regarding the Open Events committee meetings, there has actually not been a full meeting of the Open Events committee yet. Some committee members are changing their commitments to some degree, and while we’re managing this, I would anticipate a full meeting this month. You’ll certainly be advised when the meeting is scheduled.
As always, I welcome your feedback and look forward to talking with you about this or any other area of concern.”
Fun

The POTGCA writes about having a “balanced calendar.” Since the GCA has plans for a tournament every other weekend, that can only mean half for the GCA and half for everyone else.
As far as “…advising Continental Chess…”, I question why the GCA would want any other tournaments here along with their two dozen. Is the chess community large enough to support just the GCA tournaments? It is well known that Bill Goichberg, from New York, has intentionally stayed out of the South. Yes, he has held tournaments in Orlando, but how many tournaments has he held in other Southern states? The Ironman mentioned one in Nashville. One. The most famous was the Continental Open, a CCA tournament in Atlanta back in May of 1973 in which Mr. Six Time, GM Walter Browne flew in from the west coast. GM Browne was on the cover of the May, 1973 “Chess Life & Review.” Walter was treated to some “Southern hospitality,” drawing with Rueben Shocron and losing to Milan Momic, and Robert Burns, before leaving to catch a much earlier flight than anticipated. As GM Browne was leaving someone asked him why he was leaving. The Legendary Georgia Ironman was present to hear what came next, now Tim’s ALL-TIME FAVORITE chess quote. Walter turned on the man like a cobra, yelling, “I DID NOT COME HERE FOR YOUR BENEFIT!”
I realize the World Open was held in the Great State of Virginia this year, but how many tournaments has the CCA brought to the Deep South in the last forty plus years? Of all the tournaments the CCA has held since the 1970’s I will be kind and say that if one includes Louisville, although having lived there I cannot imagine anyone would, the CCA has held maybe five percent in the South, probably less. The “pooh-bahs” should consider leaving the CCA alone and concentrate on holding the conjectured GCA tournaments to the best of their ability. I would like to warn the GCA of over saturation. The Ironman and I were in the sports card business in the late 1980’s, early 90’s, before over saturation and the MLB strike of 1994. When we began there were only a few monthly shows in the metro area. Then a few were added, and then there were card shows every other weekend. More were added until it became a card show every weekend in many locations. In those halcyon days the action was fast and furious. I recall being involved in major deals that were so involved that when another customer would pick a card and pay the advertised price without haggling. I would stuff the bill in my pocket and carry on with the deal. Then the customers stopped coming because they knew there would be another show the next weekend, and the next. Near the end it was so bad at one show I told the Ironman I would not eat lunch until I made a sale. My stomach was growling all afternoon until after the show when Tim took pity on me and bought me a beer and a sammy at Spondivits, saying, “A man who don’t make even one sale shouldn’t have to pay the tab.”