USCF Board Member Supports Exclusion

One of the chess tournaments held in conjunction with the World Open was something named the “Senior Amateur.” There were two sections of this tournament, one for players rated over 2210 and one for those rated under 1810. The best Senior players were once again excluded from the tournament. There was only one NM entered in the top section, Phillip M. Collier of Maryland. The “winner” was Harry Cohen, rated 1989, also of Maryland. There were a total of 24 players in the top section, with 28 in the lower section, for a total of 52 Seniors. Included in the top section was USCF board member Michael Atkins, another player from Maryland.
As has been the case for several years the highest rated Senior players were excluded from the tournament. The fact that the best Senior players have been systematically excluded from participating is reprehensible. Michael Atkins is a USCF board member and supported the tournament by his participation, thus showing the USCF supports exclusion. The motto of FIDE is Gens una sumus, which means, “We are one people.” All, that is, except for a Senior who happens to be rated over 2210.
What is the definition of “professional” as it relates to chess? In this case the owner of the CCA, Bill Goichberg, is the arbiter. He decides and he decided a “professional” is anyone rated over 2210. As to how Mr. Goichberg came to that conclusion, your guess is as good as mine.
What if an organizer decided to hold an event open to everyone except class “C” players? Suppose he was asked why and answered, “I do not like “C” class players because they are not good enough to have reached the “B” class, the demarcation line between a player who has stopped dropping pieces, but are better than the “D” class players and would most probably win the money in an under 1600 section, so I excluded them.”
What if I decided to hold a Southern Senior Amateur open to all except “yankees” rated over 2210? I would then have to decide who is, or is not, a “yankee”. As the ultimate arbiter, a “yankee” would be whomever I decided was a “yankee.” Most of you are probably thinking, “This is preposterous.”
What if a group of Neo-Nazis in Idaho decided to host an event, the Northwest Senior, in which they advertised it would be for all players except for “Jews” rated over 2210? There would be an outcry from the media heard all over the world, and rightly so, I might add.
Substitute the word “Senior” for “yankee” or “Jew” in the above scenarios. Any way you cut it a member of the chess community is being excluded. What makes it so egregious is those players being excluded by the CCA are the very players who have worked hard all their life to reach the top and in their declining years are being told they are not welcome. So much for “Gens una sumus.”
Former Georgia Chess Champion, and my friend, Bob Joiner, related a story concerning a state championship in the late 1960’s in which the organizers had decided to exclude Mr. William Scott, a gentleman whom I respected and also considered a friend. The organizers, the arbiters of all things chess in Georgia “back in the day,” decided Mr. Scott, publisher of “The Atlanta Daily World,” one of the most respected “Black” newspapers in the United States, would not be allowed to play in the same room as the “White” players. In one of, if not the most, the finest moments in the history of chess in Georgia, Mr. Robert Joiner, and others, refused to accept the “wisdom” of the “pooh-bahs.” Bob and the group just said “No” long before Nancy Reagan. They told the “pooh-bahs” that if Mr. Scott was not allowed to play then neither would they, and there were enough of them to carry the day. Mr. Scott was allowed to play in the same room as the other players.
I, and other Senior players, feel strongly that if a Senior tournament is held anywhere, at any time, under the auspices of the USCF, every Senior alive should be allowed to participate.

ARBITER
I’ve a duty as the referee
At the start of the match
On behalf of all our sponsors
I must welcome you
Which I do — there’s a catch
I don’t care if you’re a champion
No one messes with me
I am ruthless in upholding
What I know is right
Black or white, as you’ll see

I’m on the case
Can’t be fooled
Any objection is overruled
Yes, I’m the Arbiter and I know best

CHORUS
He’s impartial
Don’t push him
He’s unimpressed

ARBITER
You’ve got your tricks
Good for you
But there’s no gambit
I don’t see through
Oh, I’m the Arbiter, I know the score
From square one I’ll be watching all 64

CHORUS
From square one he’ll be watching all 64

ARBITER
If you’re thinking of the kind of thing
That we’ve seen in the past
Chanting gurus, walkie-talkies
Walkouts, hypnotists
Tempers, fists
Not so fast
This is not the start of World War Three
No political ploys
I think both your constitutions are terrific
So now you know — be good boys

I’m on the case
Can’t be fooled
Any objection is overruled
Yes, I’m the Arbiter and I know best

CHORUS
He’s impartial
Don’t push him
He’s unimpressed
ARBITER
You’ve got your tricks
Good for you
But there’s no gambit
I don’t see through
Oh, I’m the Arbiter, I know the score
From square one I’ll be watching all 64
CHORUS
From square one he’ll be watching all 64
ARBITER
I’m on the case
Can’t be fooled
You got your tricks
Good for you
I’m on the case
Can’t be fooled
Any objection is overruled
Yes, I’m the Arbiter and I know best
CHORUS
He’s impartial
Don’t push him
He’s unimpressed
ARBITER
You’ve got your tricks
Good for you
But there’s no gambit
I don’t see through
Oh, I’m the Arbiter, I know the score
From square one I’ll be watching all 64
CHORUS
From square one he’ll be watching all 64
ARBITER
Yes, I’m the Arbiter, I know the score
From square one I’ll be watching all 64
CHORUS
From square one he’ll be watching all 64

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GCA Hegemonic Designs

An email making the rounds in the local chess community has reached the AW. The sources are impeccable. It appears the GCA board has decided to hold a chess tournament about every other weekend in the coming year. To set the stage one should know the players in this drama.
The GCA board consists of three women, Laura Doman, Katie Hartley, and Pam Little, who do not play chess; Ben Johnson, who thinks he plays chess; Fun Fong, who plays mediocre chess; and Tim Payne and Frank Johnson, who are, or have been, rated expert. These are the committees found on the GCA website (http://www.georgiachess.org/contact):
GCA Committees
By-Law Task Force: Fun Fong, Katie Hartley, Mike Mulford, Scott Parker, Jeanne Ward
Communications: Laura Doman (Director)
Membership: Parnell Watkins
Open Events: WIM Carolina Blanco (Chair), Frank Johnson, Carolyn Lantelme, Greg Maness, Tim Payne, Bryan Rodeghiero, Thad Rogers, Parnell Watkins
Scholastic: Laura Doman, Katie Hartley (Co-Chair), Tricia Hill, Ben Johnson (Co-Chair), Susan Justice, Tim Payne, Steve Schneider, Ted Wieber
Volunteer Coordinator: Frank Johnson
Web Team: Laura Doman, Katie Hartley, Vijay Jayaram, Jagadeesh Rathnasabapathy, Keith Sewell
Committee members are volunteers who can commit to a year of working on the team.
In addition there the GCA has a “Task Force”:
GCA By-Law Task Force: Fun Fong (President), Katie Hartley (2nd VP), Mike Mulford (USCF delegate, Past Treasurer), Scott Parker (Past President), Jeanne Ward (Non-profit consultant)
Suggested By-Law Revisions to be voted on June 21st by GCA Members (http://www.georgiachess.org/bylaws)
These are the current “movers and shakers” of the Georgia Chess Association.

The GCA has myriad committees. The President of the GCA, Fun Fong, posted his, “From the President: GCA May 2014 Update” (http://georgiachessnews.com/2014/05/03/from-the-president-gca-may-2014-update/) on the new online magazine, “Georgia Chess News” on May 3, 2014, in which he writes about today’s committees and those to come. I asked two respected chess luminaries, NM Chris Chambers, and former GCA President and Georgia Senior Champion Scott Parker, for their thoughts on the President’s message. This was recieved from the Discman:
Happy Monday Bacon.
“Yes I’m fine with you using my stuff on blogs.
Regarding the GCA message, he sure seems to be planning to put together lots of committees.
Are there even enough dues-paying adult GCA members to man all the spots in those committees?
At this point they’re talking about forming committees to decide how to arrange the deck chairs on the Titanic. Virtually all of the passengers (actual tournament players) have boarded the life boats and are long gone, leaving only the wanna-be TD’s to train each other how to run tournaments that nobody will attend.”
CC
Mr. Parker sent an polished, insightful and obviously well-thought-out reply:
Michael,
“Fun is very high on the concept of working through committees. I am not, nor was my predecessor, Ted Wieber. That doesn’t mean it is wrong. There is more than one way to accomplish a task. My preference, and Ted’s too, I believe, was to find a committed volunteer and put a heavy workload on him/her. Committees tend to be slow and cumbersome things, and they lack direction. Each member wants to pull it in a different direction. You’ve heard the old joke, “A platypus is an animal designed by a committee.” It’s funny because there is an underlying truth to it. Committees do tend to come out with proposals that look like they ordered from a take-out menu – something from column A, something from column B, something from colunmn C, etc.
I’m also not sure that it makes sense to operate through committees in an orgainzation that has about 200 voting members. For USCF, which has over 10,000, that’s one thing, It’s another thing for GCA. We don’t have that many committed volunteers. I prefer to work with a small number of committed people rather than a large number of casually interested people.
All this being said, I will freely admit that I didn’t do a great job of identifying those committed volunteers, and ended up doing way too much of the grunt work myself. I was so busy doing the mundane stuff that I had little time to be President. It’s hard to concentrate on your plan to drain the swamp when you’re up to your a** in aligators. My impression is that as long as I was President that probably wasn’t going to change. As long as I was President and things were getting done a crisis didn’t exist. Without a crisis, not many people jumped up to volunteer. Perhaps in the long run it would have been better if I had refused to do the grunt work and let some tournaments and projects die so that a crisis situation would exist. Maybe that would have stimulated a few volunteers to step forward. For better or worse, I was not willing to do that.
Anyway, Fun’s idea of working through committees seems to be working pretty well for him. There has been some short term dislocation, and not everything is flowing smoothly, but in general the GCA is healthy. His way may not be my way, but if it works for him, that’s all that counts. “It doesn’t matter if the cat is black or white, as long as it catches mice.” – Deng Xiao Ping.
Best Wishes, Scottt
P.S. You have my permission to use any or all of this in any way you see fit, or to copy it to anyone you choose.”

Both of these replies from my friends were received May 12, 2014. Although I tend to agree with the Discman, listening to a person who has the respect of all the chess community, as does Scott Parker, gives one a different perspective. There are always two sides of an issue and one must try, as difficult as it may be, to understand the other side.

Emails are being fired at such a rate the NSA is having trouble keeping up with the heavy volume…The first email is from WIM Carolina Blanco, Georgia Chess Open Event ( Chair).
On Monday, July 7, 2014 6:24 PM, Carolina Blanco wrote:
“Hello Everybody
Please find attached the update information for all the Open event tournaments to be organized by Georgia Chess Association from September 2014-July 2015.
Dates and location were verified according last Board meeting at Emory University on June 21st, 2014. Please note that the flyer still need to pass for one more review correction by the committee however with all these information we can see more organized our goal in maintain the tournaments organized in the past calendar year and adding two more new tournaments and new locations for the convenient and benefits of the chess community.
* Only event missing in this email ( but going to be added) is the Collegiate tournament. I am waiting for Ted Wieber to give us all the information for next year since he is the coordinator for this event.
* Location for Senior’s Open and Women’s Open is TBA since the Rivers Academy and Mrs. Justice proposal are in discussion, however the date that we saw more convenient at the board meeting in June for this event is September 20th, 2014.
* There are 4 tournaments to be held at the Wyndham Galleria Hotel and the dates in the flyer are the one that we are committed in the contract with the except of the Georgia State Championship that instead to be held on May 1st 2015. It was moved to April 18th 2015
* there are 2 new Class championship tournament added on February 27th and July 24th 2015. Beside the Class Championship on November 2014.
We are in the process to contact to Continental chess to try to extend our Open event activity from 6 tournaments a year to 12 tournaments a year for the next calendar period.
Questions?. Please feel free to email me.”
Greetings,
WIM Carolina Blanco
Georgia Chess Open Event ( Chair)

Ms. Blanco’s email evoked this response from former GCA President, International Arbiter, and chess business owner L. Thad Rogers:
On Mon, Jul 7, 2014 at 6:45 PM, thad rogers wrote:
“Why is the Georgia Chess Association trying to put
American Chess Promotions and Championship Chess
out of business.”
I have 6 weekend tournaments scheduled with the dates
with Katie.
The Georgia Chess Association is to support chess in Georgia and not put other chess companies out of business.
This is the only way I try to make a meager income. I guess you all wouldn’t mind it if a nonprofit company came along and put all of your jobs and living out the window in order to satisfy them-selves.
No board in 40 years ever tried to do such a thing. I am very proud of such a caring Georgia Chess Association. I have tried tto do nothing but help the Georgia Chess Association for 40 years.
I have five or six people tell me that Fun said he is trying to put Georgia vendors out of business. If this goes through, then I guess he will get his wish.
All my tournaments are getting to have a signed contract. If Southeast holds tournaments. Then how in the heck can anybody make any money with about 26 weekend tournaments.
Like I said, the GCA Board and Volunteers don’t have to worry because you all aren’t risking any of your personal money. You are using State Association Funds. That is something to be proud of.
Sincerely,
Thad Rogers
American Chess Promotions
I am suppose to be on the Open Events committee. I never hear a word about meetings or issues until after the fact.”

The next email is from the POTGCA:
From: Fun Fong
Date: 07/09/2014 2:49 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: thad rogers
Thad,
“It seems that there’s an unfortunate – and false – rumor circulating that the GCA is looking to put you or any other Georgia chess organization out of business. I can understand why you would be upset. You have a long personal relationship with the GCA, which we all appreciate, and many of our members have enjoyed playing in American Chess tournaments for many years. As president, my mission is to serve the greater chess community by providing a full calendar of quality events for both adult and scholastic members. It is not, nor has it ever been, to destroy another’s livelihood through the power of the GCA. There is absolutely no way that the GCA could put anyone out of business, even if it wanted to, which is certainly no one’s intentions. You will not find any legitimate conversation anywhere that has even hinted of this. Somehow, facts are becoming distorted by the time they get to you, and I am greatly troubled by the prospect of a malicious rumor mill.
It is my belief that more chess is better chess, and that the chess community will eventually expand as opportunities expand, much as have road races greatly expanded in the Metro Atlanta area. GCA does endeavor to raise the bar for quality, so that other organizers will continue to innovate in their offerings, giving the Georgia player more choices and a better selection of events to participate. This initiative should provide a better experience overall for Georgia players. I know that you have been constantly thinking of new events and ways to execute them, and I think this endeavor is working for the benefit of the Georgia player.
Still, it is my responsibility as president to promote chess and to offer our players with as many opportunities to play good competitive chess as the market will support. Besides American Chess and Championship Chess, there is the North Georgia Chess Center, Vibha, and other organizations that host all sorts of tournaments, ranging from afternoon tournaments for young beginners to multi-day events for top-rated competitive players. I believe that there is room for all because we have a large, diverse community of chess players, and tournaments by virtue of their competitive level, time requirements, or location cannot all appeal to all types of players at all times. The chess community today is not the same as it was in the past. As GCA president, I must listen to our members and respond to their demands: to expand, support, and promote opportunities for competitive, quality play.
I understand and respect your concern that an outside group may be stronger or better financed, and potentially threaten your business. We will not tolerate any organization trying to drive another out of business. On the other hand, the GCA will not act as the personal agent for a business seeking to keep others out of their “turf.” I will tell you that the GCA will be advising Continental Chess (or any other organization that we may approach or that approaches us) that we must have a balanced calendar. Similar events need to be coordinated in advance, so that they don’t overlap too often.
The GCA cannot carry out its mission if we are beholden to vendor interests – any vendor. We must maintain the balance of support to our valued vendor organizations with our responsibilities to the chess playing public. If a vendor is involved in a GCA endeavor that could be perceived as a conflict of interest, then the vendor should recuse itself from voting or debate on such an issue. As an example, and I say this with due respect, it seems that whenever the GCA proposes dates in a modest expansion of our programs, we have heard you state that the GCA has no right to do so, presumably because the proposal conflicts with your own business’ plans or calendar. We cannot function as an organization if we cannot maintain impartiality. And under my leadership, this will cease to be a problem.
Thad, I continue to honor and value your long commitment and dedication to the GCA. We are all glad to have you involved and hope that you will want to do so for a long time to come. Regarding the Open Events committee meetings, there has actually not been a full meeting of the Open Events committee yet. Some committee members are changing their commitments to some degree, and while we’re managing this, I would anticipate a full meeting this month. You’ll certainly be advised when the meeting is scheduled.
As always, I welcome your feedback and look forward to talking with you about this or any other area of concern.”
Fun

The POTGCA writes about having a “balanced calendar.” Since the GCA has plans for a tournament every other weekend, that can only mean half for the GCA and half for everyone else.
As far as “…advising Continental Chess…”, I question why the GCA would want any other tournaments here along with their two dozen. Is the chess community large enough to support just the GCA tournaments? It is well known that Bill Goichberg, from New York, has intentionally stayed out of the South. Yes, he has held tournaments in Orlando, but how many tournaments has he held in other Southern states? The Ironman mentioned one in Nashville. One. The most famous was the Continental Open, a CCA tournament in Atlanta back in May of 1973 in which Mr. Six Time, GM Walter Browne flew in from the west coast. GM Browne was on the cover of the May, 1973 “Chess Life & Review.” Walter was treated to some “Southern hospitality,” drawing with Rueben Shocron and losing to Milan Momic, and Robert Burns, before leaving to catch a much earlier flight than anticipated. As GM Browne was leaving someone asked him why he was leaving. The Legendary Georgia Ironman was present to hear what came next, now Tim’s ALL-TIME FAVORITE chess quote. Walter turned on the man like a cobra, yelling, “I DID NOT COME HERE FOR YOUR BENEFIT!”
I realize the World Open was held in the Great State of Virginia this year, but how many tournaments has the CCA brought to the Deep South in the last forty plus years? Of all the tournaments the CCA has held since the 1970’s I will be kind and say that if one includes Louisville, although having lived there I cannot imagine anyone would, the CCA has held maybe five percent in the South, probably less. The “pooh-bahs” should consider leaving the CCA alone and concentrate on holding the conjectured GCA tournaments to the best of their ability. I would like to warn the GCA of over saturation. The Ironman and I were in the sports card business in the late 1980’s, early 90’s, before over saturation and the MLB strike of 1994. When we began there were only a few monthly shows in the metro area. Then a few were added, and then there were card shows every other weekend. More were added until it became a card show every weekend in many locations. In those halcyon days the action was fast and furious. I recall being involved in major deals that were so involved that when another customer would pick a card and pay the advertised price without haggling. I would stuff the bill in my pocket and carry on with the deal. Then the customers stopped coming because they knew there would be another show the next weekend, and the next. Near the end it was so bad at one show I told the Ironman I would not eat lunch until I made a sale. My stomach was growling all afternoon until after the show when Tim took pity on me and bought me a beer and a sammy at Spondivits, saying, “A man who don’t make even one sale shouldn’t have to pay the tab.”

Dutch Springs Leak

The Dutch dam erected earlier on Jefferson Davis Highway in DC cracked in the penultimate round of the World Open. Wins pouring through the sieve as Viktor Laznicka lost to Illia Nyzhnyk, and Isan Suarez gave way to Mark Paragua. The CCA website crashed, so I have Monroi (http://www.monroi.com/) to thank for the games. Nyzhnyk fianchettoed his Queen Bishop which was the favored method of IM Boris Kogan. He explained that the dark-squared Bishop often has difficulty finding a good square, so the early development takes care of that problem. The results shown at the Chessbase Database (http://database.chessbase.com/js/apps/onlinedb/), and 365Chess (http://www.365chess.com/) look good for White in this line, proving, if proof be needed, “Hulk” Kogan knew what he was taking about when it came to chess theory.
Illia Nyzhnyk vs Viktor Laznicka
2014 World Open d 8
1.d4 d6 2.Nf3 f5 3.g3 Nf6 4.Bg2 g6 5.O-O Bg7 6.b3 O-O 7.Bb2 c6 8.Nbd2 a5 9.a4 Na6 10.Re1 Qc7 (10…Nb4 11. h3 Ne4 12. Nxe4 fxe4 13. Nd2 d5 14. c3 Na6 15. f3 Qc7 16. Kh2 exf3 17. Nxf3 Bf5 18. Qd2 Be4 19. Rf1 Rf6 20. Ba3 Raf8 21. Qe3 h6 22. h4 R8f7 23. Rac1 Qd8 24. Bh3 Nc7 25. Nd2 Bf5 26. g4 Bd7 27. Nf3 Rf4 28. Ne5 Bxe5 29. Qxe5 Re4 30. Qg3 Rxf1 31. Rxf1 Ne8 32. Bc1 Nf6 33. Bxh6 Nxg4+ 34. Kh1 Bf5 35. Bf4 Qd7 36. Rg1 Nf6 37. e3 Rxf4 38. exf4 Bxh3 39. Qxg6+ Kf8 40. Qg7+ Ke8 41. Qh8+ Kf7 42. Rg7+ Ke6 43. Qb8 Qd6 44. Qxb7 Qd8 45. Qxc6+ Kf5 46. Qb7 Ng8 47. Rg5+ Ke4 48. Qb5 1-0, Lubomir Ftacnik (2430) – Ratmir Kholmov (2550) CSR-ch 1979) 11.c3 e5 12.dxe5 dxe5 13.e4 Rd8 14.Qe2 fxe4 15.Ng5 Nc5 16.Qc4 Rd5 17.Ndxe4 Ncxe4 18.Nxe4 Nxe4 19.Bxe4 Be6 20.Bxd5 Bxd5 21.Qe2 Qf7 22.f4 Bxb3 23.fxe5 Re8 24.Qd3 Bd5 25.Ba3 Bxe5 26.Rab1 Bc4 27.Qe3 Re6 28.Qa7 Qe8 29.Qxa5 b5 30.Rbd1 Bd5 31.Bc5 Bd6 32.Bf2 bxa4 33.c4 1-0
Taimanov, Mark E – Malaniuk, Vladimir P ½-½
A87 Baku 1983
1. Nf3 f5 2. d4 d6 3. g3 Nf6 4. Bg2 g6 5. b3 Bg7 6. Bb2 O-O 7. O-O Ne4 8. c4 Nc6 9. Nbd2 Nxd2 10. Qxd2 e5 11. dxe5 dxe5 12. Qd5+ Kh8 13. Qxd8 Rxd8 14. Rad1 1/2-1/2
Mark Paragua (2506) vs Isan Suarez (2592)
2014 World Open d 8
1.d4 f5 2.Bg5 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 fxe4 5.Nxe4 d5 6.Nc3 Nh6 7.Qd2 Nf7 8.Be3 c5 9.Na4 (9. O-O-O Bxd4 10. Bxd4 e5 11. Bb5+ Nc6 12. Qe2 Qd6 13. Be3 Be6 14. Nxd5 Bxd5 15. c4 a6 16. Rxd5 1-0, Alexandr Kharitonov (2437) – Thomas Rendle (2240), EU-ch U18, 2003) cxd4 10.Bxd4 e5 11.Bc5 Nc6 12.Nf3 Be6 13.Bb5 Nd6 14.Ng5 Bh6 15.Be3 Bg8 16.Nf7 Bxf7 17.Bxc6 bxc6 18.Bxh6 Nc4 19.Qb4 Rb8 20.Qc5 Qc7 21.f4 Rb5 22.Qf2 Qa5 23.Nc3 Rxb2 24.O-O Qb6 25.Na4 Qxf2 26.Rxf2 Rb4 27.Nc5 e4 28.f5 Ke7 29.c3 Rb2 30.Rxb2 Nxb2 31.Rb1 Nd3 32.Rb7 Kf6 33.Be3 Rd8 34.Bd4 Kxf5 35.Rxf7 Kg4 36.h3 1-0

Georgians at the DC International

The Georgia contingent at the DC International was led by FM Kazim Gulamali, who scored 5 out of 9, winning 4, drawing 2, with 3 losses. Sanjay Ghatti scored 4 points, with 3 wins, 2 draws, and 4 losses. Arthur Guo and Shanmukha Meruga each scored 3 1/2. Arthur won 2, drew 3, and lost 4, while Meruga won 1, drew 3, while losing 4. Mr. Meruga also received a full point bye in the first round. Saithanusri Avirneni arrived at his 3 points by drawing 6, while losing 3. Samhitha Dasari won 1, drew 1, and lost 5. Ingrid Guo won 1, drew 1 and lost 7. “That’s what chess is all about. One day you give your opponent a lesson, the next day he gives you one.”-Bobby Fischer (http://www.chessquotes.com/player-fischer)
Games taken from the CCA website (http://www.chesstournamentservices.com/cca/2014/06/dc-international-2014-games-viewer/)

Helfst, Matt (1951) – Gulamali, Kazim (2300)
DC International 2014 Arlington, VA (1), 2014.06.26
1.Nf3 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.b4 e6 4.b5 a6 5.g3 d5 6.bxa6 Rxa6 7.cxd5 exd5 8.Bg2 Bg7 9.Bb2 O-O 10.O-O Re8 11.d3 c5 12.a4 Nc6 13.Re1 Bf5 14.Nbd2 d4 15.Qc2 b6 16.Qb3 Na5 17.Qb5 Qc8 18.Bc1 Nd5 19.Nc4 Bd7 20.Qb2 Nxc4 21.dxc4 d3 0-1

Gulamali, Kazim (2300) – Suarez, Isan (2588)
DC International 2014 Arlington, VA (2.4), 2014.06.26
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Bg5 Nbd7 7.Bc4 e6 8.Qe2 h6 9.Bxf6 Nxf6 10.O-O-O Qc7 11.f4 Be7 12.e5 dxe5 13.fxe5 Nh7 14.h4 O-O 15.Bd3 Rd8 16.Nf3 Nf8 17.g4 b5 18.Ne4 Ng6 19.g5 Nxe5 20.Nxe5 Qxe5 21.Rdf1 Bb7 22.Rhg1 hxg5 23.Rxf7 Kxf7 24.Qh5+ Kg8 25.Qg6 Rxd3 0-1

Ghatti, Sanjay (2038) – Gulamali, Kazim (2300)
DC International 2014 Arlington, VA (3), 2014.06.27
1.e4 g6 2.d4 Bg7 3.Nc3 d6 4.Be3 c6 5.Bc4 b5 6.Bb3 b4 7.Nb1 Nf6 8.f3 Nbd7 9.a3 bxa3 10.Nxa3 O-O 11.Ne2 a5 12.Qd2 Ba6 13.Nc3 Rb8 14.O-O-O Qc7 15.h4 c5 16.h5 c4 17.Ba4 Qb7 18.Bb5 Rfc8 19.Bh6 Bh8 20.Qg5 e5 21.dxe5 Bxb5 22.Naxb5 dxe5 23.Rd6 Rc5 24.hxg6 fxg6 25.Qh4 Rxb5 26.Qh3 Nf8 27.Bxf8 Kxf8 28.Nxb5 Qxb5 29.Qe6 Qxb2+ 30.Kd2 Qb4+ 31.Ke2 Re8 32.Qh3 Qxd6 0-1

Gulamali, Kazim (2300) – Wang, Qibiao (2164)
DC International 2014 Arlington, VA (4), 2014.06.27
1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 c5 4.c3 Nc6 5.Nf3 Qb6 6.a3 c4 7.Nbd2 f6 8.Be2 fxe5 9.Nxe5 Nxe5 10.dxe5 Bc5 11.O-O Ne7 12.b4 cxb3 13.Nxb3 O-O 14.Nxc5 Qxc5 15.Qd3 Bd7 16.a4 Rf7 17.Be3 Qc7 18.f4 Rc8 19.Rfc1 Nf5 20.Bd2 Qc5+ 21.Kh1 Bc6 22.Bg4 g6 23.Rf1 a5 24.Be2 Rd7 25.Bg4 d4 26.c4 Kh8 27.Rf2 b6 28.Be1 Bb7 29.Rc2 Re8 30.Bf2 Bc6 31.Bh3 Qb4 32.Rcc1 Qb2 33.Qf1 d3 34.Bg4 d2 35.Rcb1 Qc3 36.Rxb6 Be4 37.c5 h5 38.Be2 Red8 39.Rd1 Rc7 40.Rxe6 Kh7 41.Bxh5 gxh5 42.Qe2 Qc2 43.Qxh5+ Kg8 44.Qg5+ Kh7 45.Qh5+ ½-½

Gorovets, Andrey (2446) – Gulamali, Kazim (2300)
DC International 2014 Arlington, VA (5), 2014.06.28
1.c4 Nf6 2.Nc3 e5 3.Nf3 Nc6 4.g3 Bb4 5.Nd5 Bc5 6.d3 h6 7.Bg2 O-O 8.e3 d6 9.O-O a6 10.a3 Ba7 11.Nc3 Be6 12.b4 Qd7 13.Bb2 Rfe8 14.Re1 Rad8 15.Qc2 Ne7 16.Rad1 Bg4 17.Ne2 Ng6 18.d4 Bf5 19.Qb3 e4 20.Ne5 Qe7 21.Nxg6 fxg6 22.d5 Rf8 23.h3 h5 24.Qc2 Rde8 25.Nf4 Nh7 26.Bd4 Bxd4 27.Rxd4 Nf6 28.h4 Ng4 29.Nh3 c5 30.dxc6 bxc6 31.Red1 Nxe3 32.fxe3 Bxh3 33.Bxh3 Rf3 34.Bg2 Rxg3 35.Qf2 Qxh4 36.Rf1 Re5 37.Qf8+ Kh7 38.Rd2 Rxe3 39.Qxd6 Rg5 40.Qf4 Qg3 41.Qxg3 Rgxg3 42.Kh2 Rg4 43.Ra2 g5 44.a4 Rb3 45.b5 cxb5 46.cxb5 a5 1-0

Gulamali, Kazim (2300) – Malhotra, Akshay (2001)
DC International 2014 Arlington, VA (6), 2014.06.28
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 g6 6.Be3 Bg7 7.f3 Nc6 8.Qd2 O-O 9.g4 Be6 10.Nxe6 fxe6 11.O-O-O Ne5 12.Be2 Rc8 13.h4 Qa5 14.Kb1 Nc4 15.Bxc4 Rxc4 16.Ne2 Qxd2 17.Bxd2 Nd7 18.b3 Rcc8 19.Rh3 Ne5 20.Ng1 Rf7 21.g5 Rcf8 22.Rf1 a6 23.Kc1 ½-½

Zheng, Andrew (2031) – Gulamali, Kazim (2300)
DC International 2014 Arlington, VA (7), 2014.06.29
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e3 c5 5.Nf3 O-O 6.Be2 d5 7.O-O Nc6 8.a3 Bxc3 9.bxc3 dxc4 10.Bxc4 Qc7 11.Qc2 e5 12.d5 Na5 13.Ba2 c4 14.e4 Bg4 15.Ne1 Nd7 16.f3 Bh5 17.g4 Bg6 18.Be3 b5 19.Ng2 Nc5 20.Kh1 Nab7 21.Nh4 Nd3 22.Nf5 f6 23.Qd1 Kh8 24.Bb1 Nbc5 25.Bc2 Be8 26.Qd2 Bd7 27.Bxc5 Nxc5 28.Rg1 g6 29.Ne3 Nb7 30.a4 a6 31.axb5 axb5 32.Rxa8 Rxa8 33.g5 Qd6 34.Ng4 Bxg4 35.fxg4 Rf8 36.Kg2 fxg5 37.Qxg5 Kg7 38.Rb1 h6 39.Qe3 Qd7 40.Qg3 Rf4 41.h3 Nd6 42.Qe3 Qe7 43.Ra1 Rf7 44.Bd1 Qb7 45.Rb1 Qa7 46.Qxa7 Rxa7 47.Bf3 Ra2+ 48.Kf1 Rc2 0-1

Gulamali, Kazim (2300) – Dixon, Dakota (2055)
DC International 2014 Arlington, VA (8), 2014.06.29
1.e4 c5 2.d4 cxd4 3.c3 d3 4.c4 Nc6 5.Bxd3 g6 6.Nf3 Bg7 7.O-O d6 8.h3 Nf6 9.Nc3 O-O 10.Qe2 Bd7 11.Be3 Ne8 12.Rfd1 b6 13.Rac1 Nc7 14.Nd5 Rc8 15.a3 Ne6 16.Bb1 f5 17.exf5 gxf5 18.Ng5 Ne5 19.Nxe6 Bxe6 20.f4 Bxd5 21.cxd5 Ng6 22.Ba2 Qd7 23.Rc6 Kh8 24.Rdc1 Rxc6 25.dxc6 Qc7 26.Qa6 Rb8 27.Bd5 Nf8 28.Qb7 Rc8 29.b4 e6 30.Bf3 Qxb7 31.cxb7 Rxc1+ 32.Bxc1 Bd4+ 33.Kf1 Nd7 34.Ke2 Kg7 35.Kd3 Bg1 36.Bb2+ Kf7 37.g4 fxg4 38.hxg4 h6 39.g5 hxg5 40.Bh5+ Ke7 41.fxg5 e5 42.Ke4 b5 43.Bg4 Nb8 44.Kd5 Bb6 45.Bf5 Be3 46.g6 Bh6 47.Bc3 Bf8 48.Be1 Kf6 49.Be4 Ke7 50.Bf2 Kd7 51.Bxa7 Kc7 52.Bxb8+ Kxb8 53.Ke6 Kc7 54.Kf7 Bh6 55.g7 Bxg7 56.Kxg7 Kb8 57.Kf7 Kc7 58.Ke7 d5 59.Bxd5 e4 60.Bxe4 Kb8 61.Kd6 Ka7 62.Kc5 Ka6 1-0

Kazim’s opponent, GM Suarez won the tournament by 1/2 point, scoring 7 1/2.

Batista, Lazaro Reynaldo Ortiz GM (2694) – Gulamali, Kazim (2300)
DC International 2014 Arlington, VA (9), 2014.06.30
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 d6 6.g4 h6 7.h3 a6 8.Bg2 Qc7 9.Qe2 Nc6 10.Be3 g5 11.Nxc6 bxc6 12.e5 dxe5 13.Qc4 Bb7 14.O-O-O Rc8 15.h4 Rg8 16.hxg5 hxg5 17.Ne4 Nxe4 18.Qxe4 Be7 19.Qh7 Kf8 20.Qe4 Rb8 21.Ba7 Rc8 22.Rh7 Ba8 23.Qf3 Rg7 24.Qh3 Rxh7 25.Qxh7 Bb4 1-0

Cheng, Bindi (2410) – Ghatti, Sanjay (2038)
DC International 2014 Arlington, VA (6), 2014.06.28
1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 e6 4.O-O Be7 5.d4 O-O 6.c4 dxc4 7.Qc2 a6 8.Qxc4 b5 9.Qc2 Bb7 10.Bd2 Ra7 11.a3 Be4 12.Qc1 Qc8 13.Be3 Nd5 14.Nc3 Nxc3 15.Qxc3 Bd5 16.Ne5 Bxg2 17.Kxg2 Rb7 18.Rfc1 Nd7 19.Nc6 Bd6 20.Bf4 Nb6 21.Qf3 Qa8 22.Na5 Rbb8 23.Qxa8 Rxa8 24.Bxd6 cxd6 25.Rc6 Nc8 26.Rac1 d5 27.b3 g6 28.R1c5 Ne7 29.Rc7 Nf5 30.e3 Nd6 31.Nc6 Kg7 32.Ne5 Ne4 33.Rc2 Nd6 34.R2c6 Rfd8 35.Rb6 a5 36.Rcc6 Nc8 37.Ra6 Ne7 38.Rcb6 a4 39.Rxa8 Rxa8 40.b4 Rc8 41.Rb7 Nf5 42.Nxf7 Kg8 43.g4 Rc3 44.gxf5 Rxa3 45.Nh6+ Kf8 46.f6 1-0

Nguyen, Tan (1870) – Ghatti, Sanjay (2038)
DC International 2014 Arlington, VA (8), 2014.06.29
1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.e3 Nf6 4.Nf3 Be7 5.Nc3 O-O 6.Bd3 dxc4 7.Bxc4 b6 8.O-O Bb7 9.b3 c5 10.Bb2 Nc6 11.Qe2 cxd4 12.exd4 Nxd4 13.Nxd4 Qxd4 14.Nd5 Qc5 15.b4 Qd6 16.Be5 Qd7 17.Bxf6 Bxd5 18.Bxd5 Bxf6 19.Bxa8 Bxa1 20.Rd1 Qe7 21.Bc6 Bf6 22.b5 Rd8 23.g3 g6 24.Kg2 Rd4 25.Rxd4 Bxd4 26.Qf3 Kg7 27.h3 e5 28.Qd5 Kf8 29.h4 h5 30.Kg1 Qa3 31.Kg2 Qb2 32.Qf3 f5 33.Bd7 Qxa2 34.Bc6 Qb2 35.Kf1 Kg7 36.Kg2 e4 37.Qf4 e3 38.Qc7+ Kh6 39.Qf4+ Kh7 40.Qc7+ Bg7 41.Qf4 e2 42.Qe3 Qe5 0-1

Ghatti, Sanjay (2038) – Sapozhnikov, Roman (2298)
DC International 2014 Arlington, VA (9), 2014.06.30
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be2 e6 7.Be3 Be7 8.O-O O-O 9.f4 Qc7 10.Bf3 Nc6 11.Qe2 Nxd4 12.Bxd4 e5 13.fxe5 dxe5 14.Bf2 Be6 15.Rfd1 Bc5 16.Bxc5 Qxc5+ 17.Qf2 Rac8 18.Rd2 Qb4 19.Nd5 Bxd5 20.c3 Qc5 21.exd5 e4 22.Qxc5 Rxc5 23.Bd1 Rxd5 24.Rxd5 Nxd5 25.Bc2 Nf6 26.Rd1 h5 27.h3 Re8 28.Kf2 h4 29.Ke3 Nh5 30.Rd7 Re6 31.Rxb7 g5 32.Bb3 Rf6 33.Kxe4 Nf4 34.Kf3 Kg7 35.Kg4 Kg6 36.Bc2+ Kh6 37.Kf3 Nxh3+ 38.Ke3 Nf2 39.Rb4 Kh5 40.Kd2 g4 41.Rd4 h3 42.gxh3 g3 43.Rd5+ Kh4 0-1

Ivanov, Mike (2137) – Guo, Arthur
DC International 2014 Arlington, VA (5), 2014.06.28
1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 d6 3.g3 Nc6 4.Bg2 e6 5.Nge2 g6 6.d3 Bg7 7.Be3 e5 8.O-O Nge7 9.f4 O-O 10.Qd2 Nd4 11.fxe5 dxe5 12.Nd5 Nxd5 13.exd5 Bg4 14.Nc3 Rc8 15.h3 Bd7 16.Ne4 Bf5 17.g4 Bxe4 18.dxe4 b6 19.a4 c4 20.Qf2 f5 21.gxf5 gxf5 22.Bxd4 fxe4 23.Qg3 exd4 24.Bxe4 Kh8 25.Rxf8+ Qxf8 26.Qh4 h6 27.Rf1 Qg8 28.Kh1 Rf8 29.Rxf8 Qxf8 30.Kg2 Qf6 31.Qg4 Qg5 32.Qxg5 hxg5 33.Kf3 d3 34.cxd3 cxd3 35.Bxd3 Bxb2 36.Kg4 Bf6 37.Kf5 Kg7 38.Ke6 Bd4 39.d6 b5 40.axb5 Bb6 41.Ke7 Bc5 42.Bc4 Bb4 43.Bf7 Bc5 44.Bh5 Bb4 45.Be2 Bc5 46.Bg4 Bb4 47.Bf3 Bc5 48.Be2 Bb4 49.b6 axb6 50.Bb5 Bc5 51.Kd7 Kf6 52.Kc7 Ke5 53.d7 Be7 54.Be2 Bf6 55.Bc4 Be7 56.d8=Q Bxd8+ 57.Kxd8 Kf4 58.Be6 b5 59.Ke7 b4 60.Kf6 b3 61.Bxb3 g4 62.h4 g3 63.Bd5 Kg4 ½-½

Lopez, Jorge (2042) – Guo, Arthur
DC International 2014 Arlington, VA (8), 2014.06.29
1.e4 c5 2.c3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.cxd4 d5 5.Bb5+ Nc6 6.Nf3 Bd6 7.Nc3 a6 8.Bd3 Nge7 9.O-O Bc7 10.Re1 dxe4 11.Bxe4 Qd6 12.g3 f5 13.Bc2 O-O 14.Bb3 Ng6 15.Ng5 Rf6 16.d5 Nce7 17.Qh5 h6 18.Nxe6 Bxe6 19.Rxe6 Rxe6 20.dxe6 f4 21.Nd5 fxg3 22.Nxe7+ Nxe7 23.Qf7+ Kh8 24.hxg3 Bb6 25.Bf4 Qb4 26.Rd1 Bc5 27.Be5 Rg8 28.Qh5 Kh7 29.Bc2+ g6 30.Bf4 Nf5 31.Bxf5 gxf5 32.Qxh6# 1-0

Guo, Arthur – Nieto, Manuel (2057)
DC International 2014 Arlington, VA (9), 2014.06.30
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 g6 4.O-O Bg7 5.Re1 Nf6 6.c3 O-O 7.d4 cxd4 8.cxd4 d5 9.exd5 Nxd5 10.Bxc6 bxc6 11.Nc3 Bg4 12.Be3 Rb8 13.Nxd5 Qxd5 14.b3 Rfd8 15.Rc1 Rb5 16.h3 Bxf3 17.Qxf3 Qxf3 18.gxf3 Bxd4 19.Bxd4 Rxd4 20.Rxe7 Ra5 21.Rxc6 Rd1+ 22.Kg2 Rg5+ 23.Kh2 Rd2 24.h4 Rxf2+ 25.Kh1 Ra5 26.Rc8+ Kg7 27.Rcc7 Raxa2 28.Rxf7+ Kg8 29.Rg7+ Kf8 30.Rgf7+ Ke8 31.Rfe7+ Kf8 32.Rf7+ ½-½

Meruga, Shanmukha – Kaufman, Lawrence GM (2329)
DC International 2014 Arlington, VA (2), 2014.06.26
1.e4 e6 2.Nf3 d5 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.exd5 exd5 5.d4 c6 6.Bd3 Be7 7.h3 O-O 8.O-O Re8 9.Re1 Nbd7 10.Bf4 Nf8 11.Qd2 Ne6 12.Be5 Nd7 13.Bg3 Ndf8 14.Nd1 Bd6 15.Bxd6 Qxd6 16.c3 Bd7 17.Ne3 Nf4 18.Bc2 Qf6 19.Ng4 Nxh3+ 20.gxh3 Qxf3 21.Qg5 Bxg4 22.Qxg4 Qf6 23.h4 Re7 24.f4 h6 25.Kf2 Rae8 26.Rxe7 Qxe7 27.Kf1 Qe3 28.Rd1 h5 29.Qxh5 Qxf4+ 30.Kg2 g6 31.Qf3 Qxh4 32.Rf1 Qg5+ 33.Kh2 f5 34.Rg1 Qh6+ 35.Kg2 Re3 0-1

Nieto, Guillermo (1982) – Meruga, Shanmukha
DC International 2014 Arlington, VA (4), 2014.06.27
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.c3 d6 5.d4 exd4 6.cxd4 Bb4+ 7.Nc3 Bg4 8.O-O Nf6 9.d5 Bxf3 10.Qxf3 Ne5 11.Qe2 Qd7 12.Bb3 O-O 13.Bg5 Kh8 14.a3 Bc5 15.Na4 Qg4 16.Qxg4 Nexg4 17.Nxc5 dxc5 18.f3 Ne5 19.Bxf6 gxf6 20.Rac1 b6 21.Rfd1 Rg8 22.Kf2 Rg6 23.g3 Rd8 24.Ba2 a5 25.Kg2 h5 26.f4 Ng4 27.Rd3 Nh6 28.b4 axb4 29.axb4 Ra8 30.Bb3 cxb4 31.Rxc7 Rgg8 32.d6 Rgc8 33.Rd4 Rd8 34.d7 1-0

Meruga, Shanmukha – Barot, Siddharth
DC International 2014 Arlington, VA (9), 2014.06.30
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Qxd4 Nc6 5.Bb5 Bd7 6.Bxc6 Bxc6 7.Nc3 Nf6 8.Bg5 e5 9.Qd3 Be7 10.Rd1 O-O 11.O-O Qb6 12.b3 Rfd8 13.Bxf6 Bxf6 14.Nd5 Bxd5 15.Qxd5 Rac8 16.c4 a5 17.Qd3 a4 18.Qe3 Qxe3 19.fxe3 Be7 20.g4 h6 21.Ra1 Rc6 22.Rfd1 Rdc8 23.Rd5 Rb6 24.Nd2 Ra8 25.Rb1 Kh7 26.b4 Rc6 27.Ra5 Rxa5 28.bxa5 Bd8 29.a6 bxa6 30.Rc1 Rb6 31.Rb1 Kg6 32.Rxb6 Bxb6 33.Kf2 Kg5 34.Kf3 Kh4 35.Nf1 Kh3 36.Ng3 g6 37.Ne2 Ba5 38.Nc1 Bb4 39.Nd3 Ba3 40.Nf2+ Kxh2 41.Nd1 Bb4 42.Nb2 a3 43.Nd3 a5 44.Nc1 h5 45.gxh5 gxh5 46.Kf2 h4 47.Nd3 h3 48.Nc1 Bd2 49.Nd3 Bxe3+ 50.Kxe3 Kg1 51.Nf2 h2 52.Nh1 Kf1 53.Kd2 f6 ½-½

10th Annual Georgia Senior Open

The Georgia Senior is scheduled to be played the weekend of Sept. 28-29. The tournament announcement on the GCA website states registration is limited to 50 players, a pipe dream if ever there was one. Checking today the website shows 46 places left. I am not surprised. I refused to play last year and will not participate again this year. What’s more, I do not know anyone else planning on playing. The poor choice of venue was discussed in my last post, so the format of the tournament will be discussed in this post.
The President of the GCA, Fun Fong, insisted on a format for the 2012 Georgia Senior against the wishes of many, if not most, of those eligible to participate. He decided to have only one prize, a $500 stipend to the winner to be used only toward playing in the US Senior. Only NINE players participated, the lowest number of all other Georgia Senior tournaments to date. It was, obviously, a miserable failure. The winner of the tournament decided not to make the trip to upstate New York, at the strong urging of his wife. The winner, NM Alan Piper, has received nothing for winning the tournament. Alan has no idea what happened to the $500, which should have gone to him. I have been unable to learn what happened to the money. This is an open plea for any member of the GCA board to leave a comment on this blog informing the chess community of the disposition of the $500.
During an interview with the Legendary Georgia Ironman, NM Tim Brookshear, it was stated the President of the GCA reached out, asking Tim for his input on how the 2013 Ga Senior should be changed. Tim said a relative newcomer to chess, Parnell Watkins, was also consulted by the President. Tim suggested a committee of stewards be brought on board as consultants, with such Senior luminaries as former Georgia Champion and Georgia Senior Champion David Vest; former Ga Senior Champion and former President of the GCA board, Scott ‘The Sheriff’ Parker; Dr. Orlando Cano; and Kelly Hollins, along with others, being mentioned. Tim wanted to plan a good tournament that would attract Senior players from other states, such as Wayne Christiansen and Klaus Pohl from the Great State of South Carolina, Tim ‘The Dude’ Bond, along with Rex Blalock and his wife, from the Great State of Alabama. That was the last Tim heard from Fun Fong concerning the Georgia Senior. The suggestions of the Legendary Georgia Ironman, who has been involved with chess in Georgia continually for four decades, fell on deaf ears. Tim was as shocked as everyone else to learn the tournament had been planned for this fall. Word is Fun Fong wanted to hold the tournament in conjunction with the other tournaments scheduled that weekend. Could this have been his response to the recent Carolinas Chess Festival?
Fun Fong obviously liked his idea of awarding a $500 stipend because it is back again this year. The entry fee has been raised to accommodate other prizes, which were not there last year. I do not recall specifically, but it seems the entry fee is almost double this year compared to last. Fun Fong obviously thinks a large increase in the entry fee will bring in more players. The $500 stipend idea proved a disaster last year, yet Fun Fong, and make no mistake, this is Fun Fong’s tournament, insists on keeping it for this tournament. Albert Einstein said the definition of insanity is, “Doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.”
The Ga Senior has been divided into three sections, the Open, Under 1800, and unrated. This makes absolutely no sense because there will barely be enough players for one section. The time control is G/100 with a 30 second increment. I have yet to find a Senior player who likes this time control. We Seniors played for decades with a time control of 40/2, or even 40/90, with additional time added. FIDE has announced the first time control should end at move 40. Over the years organizers have tried various first time controls, such as 30, or 35, but best by test is move 40. Most games are decided at, or after, move 40. Seniors realize the chess world has moved forward with increasingly faster time controls at a time when we are slowing down. Our pleas to hold the line have fallen on deaf ears, with the younger people forcing Seniors to follow their dictates, or else not play. Most have chosen to opt out. LM David Vest said, “My game used to be predicated on putting the pressure on around move 32.” Seniors played for DECADES with the crisis coming around or near move 40. Our motto is, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” Everything changes, but change just for the sake of change is not good. Sometimes “progress ain’t,” and this is one of those times. Seniors resent the changes being forced upon them. Some still play for the love of the game, but do not like it. Most have given up the game.
The fact is that the body of a Senior player is not the same as a young person. In the movie, “The Bucket List”, the character played by legendary actor Jack Nicholson enumerates three rules for an older man. One of them is to “Never pass up a men’s room.” The reason for that Seniors know only too well. Every male Senior will have to deal with the fact his prostate gland will enlarge and press on his bladder. This means Seniors must go to the men’s room far more often than when younger. With any open ended time control it may not be possible to go to the men’s room. Forcing such a situation on a Senior is uncivilized. A Senior playing on any increment may be forced to lose on time if he goes to answer the call, or piss his pants. This happened to me once because I chose to sit there in pain in lieu of going to the men’s room. Playing with a delay, although a pawn up, I lost the game and upon getting out of my chair, could not make it to the men’s room in time. I vowed then and there to never again put myself in such a situation! What Seniors desire is a time limit whereby additional time will be added, as it was “back in the day,” in order for us to be able to answer the call when nature knocks. Why is it organizers cannot understand this simply fact? It is not only their sanity I question when it comes to the matter of bodily functions. These open ended time controls seem like something the man from the “dark side,” Darth Cheney, would have dreamed up. Waterboarding sounds like fun compared to these ridiculous time controls! IM Boris Kogan told me it was important to get up after making time control in order to “clear one’s head.” That is not possible with these open ended time controls. Some have mentioned the possibility of “shooting out several really quick moves in order to build up time,” so as to be able to “run to the men’s room.” First, shooting off even one quick move in chess can lead to an immediate loss. Second, Seniors no longer have the capacity to run without possibly inducing a heart attack, or a stroke.
The first round is at noon, Saturday the 28th. I assume this is to accommodate all the players from out of town who will not be coming. This means the second round will begin at 5:30. In an email several years ago from the CCA promoter, Bill Goichberg, I was told he would not play a round beginning after four (or was it five?) PM. Not to mention the fact that the second round could be delayed by a long Queen & Pawn, or other such, ending, and possibly begin even later. From what I learned about the venue of the tournament, I would not want to be heading to the parking lot after dark. The fact is, I would not want to go to that place during broad daylight! A woman was murdered in the area during the day. See the previous post for details.
There is a picture of Fun Fong on the website of the NCCA in an article on the North Carolina Gambit titled, “Random Thoughts and Observations on the Carolinas Chess Festival,” posted September 17, 2013, by the webmaster, Gary Newsome.(http://www.ncchess.org/wordpress/) Gary writes, “On Friday afternoon, Fun Fong (President of the Georgia Chess Association) and his entourage came in to start working on the NC Open.” I mentioned this during my interview with the Legendary Georgia Ironman and his comment was, “Fun travels to tournaments such as the US Open and World Open, so he knows what a good tournament is, yet he brings us nothing but crap tournaments, and you can quote me on that.” I will leave you with a quote by former Vice President of the US, Dan Qualye: “People that are really very weird can get into sensitive positions and have a tremendous impact on history.”