The Game of the 2020 Duchamp Open

This was The Game of the 2020 Duchamp Open:

GM Darcy Lima 2526

vs IM Pablo Ismael Acosta  2416

Duchamp Cup 2020 round 08

E11 Bogo-Indian defence

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 Bb4+ 4. Bd2 a5 5. Nc3 O-O 6. Qc2 d5 7. e3 c5 8. a3 Bxc3 9. Bxc3 cxd4 10. Bxd4 Nc6 11. Bc3 Qe7 12. Bd3 h6 13. O-O dxc4 14. Bxc4 Bd7 15. Rac1 Rfc8 16. Rfd1 Be8 17. Ba2 b5 18. Bb1 b4 19. axb4 axb4 20. Be1 g6 21. Qc4 Nd5 22. Qe2 Qf6 23. g3 Nb6 24. e4 Nd7 25. Kg2 Rab8 26. Rc2 g5 27. h3 Nde5 28. Nxe5 Qxe5 29. Qe3 Rd8 30. Rdc1 Qd4 31. Qe2 Ne5 32. Rd2 Qb6 33. Qh5 Kg7 34. Qd1 Bb5 35. Qb3 Rdc8 36. Rdc2 Rxc2 37. Bxc2 Bc4 38. Qa4 Qd4 39. Rd1 Qc5 40. Rd2 Bb5 41. Qb3 Ra8 42. Bb1 Ra1 43. Qd1 Qc4 44. Bd3 Rxd1 45. Bxc4 Rxd2 0-1
https://www.chessbomb.com/arena/2020-duchamp-cup/08-Lima_Darcy-Acosta_Pablo_Ismael

Let me set the stage for you. GM Darcy Lima is a Senior, born in 1962. His opponent, IM Pablo Ismael Acosta, born in 1999, is pre-zero. It’s OK, boomer! The younger player led the tournament with six points, the older 5 1/2.

I urge you to play through the game on a real board with pieces to get a FEEL of the game. Then return and read my analysis of the game.

Lima v Acosta

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 Bb4+ 4. Bd2 a5 (Komodo @depth 38 takes the bishop. SF 11 @depth 63 (!) brings the bishop home with 4…Be7, which has been played in only 4% of the games. Taking the bishop occurred in 17%. 4…Qe7 shows 41%. The game move has been played 23%)

5. Nc3 (Komodo and SF play 5 a3, which has only been played 17% of the time; the game move has been played 20%. The most often played move in this position heretofore has been 5 g3 which has been played in half the games in the CBDB)
5…O-O (Komodo plays 5…b6)

6. Qc2 (Komodo likes 6 e3) 6…d5 7. e3 c5 (SF and 61% of the games in this position show 7…b6) 8. a3 Bxc3 9. Bxc3 cxd4 10. Bxd4 (SF plays this. For 10 Nxd4 see Schachinger vs Wohl below)

10…Nc6 11. Bc3 Qe7 12. Bd3 h6 13. O-O dxc4 14. Bxc4 Bd7 15. Rac1 Rfc8 (15…e5) 16. Rfd1 Be8 (Again, e5)

17. Ba2 (It is interesting that the GM chose to retreat in lieu of advancing with e4) 17…b5 18. Bb1 b4 19. axb4 axb4

20. Be1? (Again the GM retreats when 20 Bxf6 Qxf6 21 Qh7+ was possible)

20…g6? (I recall reading something about not moving the pawns in front of your king when under attack. SF would play 20…Qb7, and there are other, better, moves, so the move is questionable) 21. Qc4 Nd5 (SF wants to play 21…Kg7 and hold on…)

22. Qe2 Qf6 23. g3 Nb6 24. e4 Nd7 (27…Nd4) 25. Kg2 Rab8 26. Rc2 g5 27. h3 Nde5 28. Nxe5 Qxe5 29. Qe3 Rd8 30. Rdc1 (30. Rcd2) 30…Qd4 31. Qe2 Ne5 32. Rd2 Qb6

33. Qh5 (f4) Kg7 34. Qd1 Bb5 (Which side do you prefer?)

35. Qb3 Rdc8 36. Rdc2 (SF concludes 36. Rxc8 Rxc8 37. f4 best) 36…Rxc2 37. Bxc2 Bc4 38. Qa4 (Qe3 is a better move) 38… Qd4 39. Rd1 Qc5 40. Rd2 Bb5 41. Qb3 Ra8

42. Bb1? (With this move GM Darcy Lima let go of the rope…) 42…Ra1 43. Qd1? (This is another howler. It continues to go from bad to SPLAT!) 43…Qc4 44. Bd3 Rxd1 45. Bxc4 Rxd2 0-1

Did you get the “feeling” after white made his thirty third move that the player of the black pieces was strengthening while the player behind the white pieces was fading? It was almost as if the younger player was drawing the life out of the older player. With a twenty move draw playing with the white pieces in the final round the lesser titled and lower rated player finished one half point in front of a pack of four players on seven. GM Lima finished in a tie for eight place with a large group with six points.

Mario Schachinger (2232) vs Aleksandar H Wohl (2439)

2005 Graz open

D02 Queen’s pawn game

1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 e6 3.c4 Bb4+ 4.Bd2 a5 5.e3 Nf6 6.Nc3 O-O 7.Qc2 c5 8.a3 Bxc3 9.Bxc3 cxd4 10.Nxd4 e5 11.Nf3 e4 12.Nd2 Nbd7 13.cxd5 Re8 14.Bc4 Ne5 15.Bb5 Bd7 16.Bxd7 Nexd7 17.O-O Rc8 18.Qa4 b6 19.Rfd1 Nc5 20.Bxf6 Qxf6 21.Qb5 a4 22.d6 Red8 23.Nc4 Nd3 24.Rd2 Rc5 25.Qa6 h5 26.Rf1 b5 27.Na5 Rg5 28.Nb7 Qf3 0-1

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.