Hou Yifan Says Women Cannot Compete With Men

After reading the previous post Brian McCarthy left a comment which concerned the article you are about to read, but it was not the original article. This morning there was an email from Dennis Fritzinger which included a link to the article. Thanks, Dennis!

‘Queen of chess’ says it’s hard to imagine women competing at same level as men

By Leon Watson
12 October 2019

The gender gap in sport may be narrowing, but in the game of chess women may never reach the levels of their male counterparts – according to the world’s best female player.
University of Oxford student Hou Yifan said the cerebral game won’t get a female world champion for decades because women “are less focused” than men, don’t train as hard and are at a physical disadvantage.

The 25-year-old, who is often referred to as the Queen of Chess’, has opened a row in the normally genial world of chess.
Her comments follow a controversial claim by English Grandmaster Nigel Short that men and women should just accept they are “hard-wired very differently”.
Short, who was widely criticised for his stance, said he “would have been ripped to shreds as a misogynist dinosaur” if he’d said the same as Hou.

Speaking to chess.com, Hou said: “Theoretically, there should be a possibility that a woman can compete for the title in the future, but practically I think that the chances of this happening in the next few decades are very small.
“I do think the average rating of female players could improve, but the gap between the top women right now and the players competing for the world title is really quite large.
“But if you look at any sport, it’s hard to imagine girls competing at the same level as men.
“I think there is a physical aspect because chess exhausts a lot of energy, especially when games last 6-7 hours, and here women could be more disadvantaged.
“But in general, I think women train less hard at chess compared to men while they’re growing up.
“In China, girls tend to think more about university, and then things like family, life balance… while boys are more focused and persistent on that one thing.
“This makes a big difference. The ones who put greater effort in achieving better results. But I also think there are external factors too.”
In chess, there is the World Championship which is open to all and is currently held by the Norwegian Magnus Carlsen. Since its inception in 1886, all 16 undisputed champions have been men.
There is also a parallel Women’s World Championship and women-only tournaments designed to encourage female participation in the sport.
However, while Hou is a four-time winner of the women’s crown, in recent years she has chosen not to compete in women’s events in order to compete against higher-ranked players.
Hou, who became a Grandmaster aged 14, is the number one ranked female player but number 87 among men and women. She is one of just three women, along with Judit Polgar and Maia Chiburdanidze, to have cracked the world’s top 100.

However, there is a big gap between Hou’s rating and the top men. By comparison, Hou’s current rating is 2659, while world number one Carlson is more than 200 points higher on 2876.
The next strongest female player is another Chinese player, Wenjun Ju, way back at world number 288 with a rating of 2586.
Hou said: “Growing up, female players are told, ‘If you win the girls’ title, we’ll be really proud of you, and this is a great job!’ It’s unlikely that any of them were told, ‘No, you should be fighting for the overall title!’
“Girls are told at an early age that there’s a kind of gender distinction, and they should just try their best in the girls’ section and be happy with that. So without the motivation to chase higher goals, it’s harder for girls to improve as fast as boys as they grow up.”
Asked if she believes there are any gender differences in the way men and women play the game, Hou added: “To me, in all aspects of life, sometimes women and men tend to see the same thing from completely different perspectives, and that also comes into chess.
“To put it simplistically, I think male players tend to have a kind of overview or strategy for the whole game, rather than focusing too much attention on one part of the game. It could be interesting to explore this further. I need to do more research to answer this properly!”

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2019/10/12/queen-chess-says-hard-imagine-women-competing-level-men/amp/

Chess Segregation

After reading Kevin Spragett’s post dated March 30, 2019, Friday Coffee
by kevinspraggettonchess · Published March 29, 2019 · Updated March 30, 2019, (http://www.spraggettonchess.com/friday-coffee-24/) which includes the question, “Is Chess Sexist?”, I sent Kevin an email:

Kevin,

You write, “We acknowledge that there is no fundamental difference when it comes to the brain of a women or that of a man.” You, sir, are WRONG! I have written much on my blog concerning the science and studies which confirm just how wrong are you as there is a “fundamental difference” between the male and female brain, which you would have known if you had read my blog.

After reading the new book, Gender and Our Brains, by Gina Rippon,

I must apologize to Kevin and admit being wrong. Although there appear to be some differences between the male brain when compared with the female brain that does not mean there is any difference between the two brains when it comes to cognitive ability. For example:

Study finds some significant differences in brains of men and women

By Michael Price Apr. 11, 2017

The largest study to look at sex differences in brain anatomy found that women tend to have thicker cortices, whereas men had higher brain volume. (https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/04/study-finds-some-significant-differences-brains-men-and-women)

Are Male and Female Brains Biologically Different?

The scientific debate around this question keeps raging, but one neuroscientist says we’re more alike than we think.

By Taylor Lorenz Jun 25, 2018

(https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2018/06/male-female-brains-biologically-different/563702/)

Ms.Rippon writes, “We have tracked the “blame the brain” campaign down the ages, and seen how diligent was the scientists’ pursuit of those brain differences that would keep women in their place. If a unit of measurement didn’t exist to characterize those inferior female brains, then one must be invented!”

She also writes, “Hence men’s more efficient callosal filtering mechanism explained their mathematical and scientific genius (with chess brilliance thrown in for good measure), their right to be captains of industry, win Nobel Prizes and so on and on. In this instance, in the “size matters” wars, with respect to the corpus callosum, small is beautiful.”

This is the only place in which one finds the word “chess” in the four hundred pages of the book.

If you believe Gina Rippon’s thesis then the question of why women are segregated in Chess must be asked. As a matter of fact the question was asked by E.E. Deedon in a letter (via email) to Chess Life magazine in the July 2019 issue. Mr. Deedon wrote:

“I just received my May 2019 edition of Chess Life, “The Women’s Issue.” What I cannot understand is the fact that men and women are still segregated after it has become quite obvious that men have no “advantage” when playing against women as they would obviously have in “physical” sports like football, basketball, and track and field. Would you be so kind to enlighten me as to why this situation still exists?”

For my international readers I must mention that when E.E. uses the word “football” he is talking about the American version, what I call “maimball”, not what is known in the rest of the world, which is called “soccer” here in the United States of America.

There follows in Chess Life:

Women’s Program Director for US Chess, WGM Jennifer Shahade

(that’s for WOMAN Grandmaster, as opposed to a real Grandmaster, whether male of female. For the international readers, Jennifer Shahade is rated 2301 US and 2322 FIDE. She has earned the title of “Original Life Master” from the United States Chess Federation. Although I am uncertain how one becomes an OLM I do know that if Jennifer were a male she would be considered just another National Master) responds:

“Women have historically been outnumbered in chess competition (She could stop there as it answers the question, but adds more, much more, as if she is a long-winded politician running for office) and most women and girls play and study in mixed competitions for the majority of the time.”

This begs the question of how she knows “most women and girls study in mixed competitions.”

Jennifer continues:

“Women’s spaces, tournaments, and camps are great ways to allow them to work on their game, make friendships, and get attention for their success and talent, which creates a positive, self-perpetuating cycle that brings more girls and women into the game.”

You are not alone in your curiosity. Your question is by far the most frequent I get when hosting, supporting, or streaming an event that includes a women’s or girl’s component. Unfortunately, when this question is asked, it is often negatively charged, and changes a positive event (women and girls enjoying and playing chess) into a forum for amateur analysis of gender, biology, and sociology. This line of questioning is so common that streamers like Alexander Botez (as featured in the first edition of my Ladies Knight podcast) create automated moderator responses for her streams – if the questioning become negative, moderators advise re-focusing on the chess.

Which brings me to an important point when we talk about women and girls in chess. As Woman’s Program Director, I focus on the positive as we grow the game: from Jennifer Yu’s stirring victory to the inspiring story of Phiona Mutesi, from Rachael Li’s standing as the top nine year old in the U.S. to the rich history of women’s chess from Menchik to Graf to Rudenko.

Thanks for you interest in US Chess Women!”

What, women cannot “work on their game, make friendships, and get attention for their success and talent” by attending a “space” -whatever that means- tournament or camp that includes males?

Who judges when a question is “negatively charged?” If anyone suggests females play in tournaments open to everyone regardless of sex does Jennifer consider that to be “negatively charged?”

I played Backgammon professionally for a time and women were welcomed in tournaments. There were no tournaments for only women.

Jennifer’s ridiculous answer to an important question can be distilled to, “Because we’re special.” Women want to eat their cake and have it too. It is as simple as that…

The fact is that men resent preferential treatment for women in Chess because females are diverting money from the small pool of Chessbucks which should go to the best player(s) regardless of sex. Period.

As I write this a Chess tournament, the FIDE chess.com Grand Swiss, is unfolding in the Isle of Man. In the second round the female player GM Antoaneta Stefanova defeated male player Gawain Jones. IM Batkhuyag Munguntuul bested GM Sergei Movsesian.

There are many female players challenging males. I do not know exactly how many, or what percentage, are female because Chess Results (http://chess-results.com/tnr478041.aspx) makes no distinction between the sexes.

There are more women and girls involved with Chess than ever before and it started with the so-called “youth movement,” which began when money earmarked for Master Chess was, shall we say to be kind, diverted to children’s Chess. With this brought an influx of “Chess moms,” a term first heard in relation to soccer, as in “Soccer mom.” It has gotten to the point that many women have been placed in positions of power in the Chess world, taking positions formerly held by men. For example, in the Spring 2018issue of the American Chess Magazine

there is an interview with the new executive director of the USCF, Carol Meyer.

Pete Tamburro posed this question to the new E.D.:

Have you learned to play chess? (Upon reading this my first thought was, “What The Fork?”) Anybody offer you lessons? Do you have a chess strategic plan?

Answer:

“I know how to move the pieces and have played with my family.” (I’m thinking, “You’re kidding me, right?”) “What I’ve learned is that playing chess for a tournament player is a very different concept from playing chess as a casual player. (How would the woman know that if she has NEVER PLAYED A TOURNAMENT GAME?) I have considered taking lessons after I settle in a bit more. I was thinking about blogging the personal experience of someone over the age of 50 learning the game.”

Good luck with that! The fact is that Chess is so difficult it is almost impossible for anyone over the age of 50 to learn how to play a decent game of Chess. I have attempted to teach Chess to men in their 30s to no avail. One gentleman was an attorney with a prominent law firm who informed me he had accomplished whatever it was he attempted until trying to play Chess.

From the earliest days of my involvement in Chess everyone involved came from some kind of Chess background. It may not have been required, but that was the way it was…I have battled over the Chess board with many USCF pooh bahs, such as Don Schultz, President of several different state organizations. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Don_Schultz) Don was POTUSCF at one time. The fact is I cannot recall all of the many positions Don held in Chess. I do know he was once President of the Georgia Chess Association. This woman, Carol Meyer, in that position makes the USCF President, Allen Priest, rated 701 after having played 45 games in his life (10 wins; 3 draws) look like a battle scarred veteran. What can this woman possibly know about the Royal game? Is having someone who knows almost nothing about Chess good for the USCF? Having a litigious imbecile as POTUS has not exactly turned out well for the USA or the world, and it will get worse before he is impeached and forced to resign. I do not know about you but I would not want the pilot of my plane to say, “I know how to push the buttons and have flown in a simulator.”

Then there is the Publications Editor, Melinda Matthews. I searched the USCF and found her listed along with other rated players but the USCF MSA page shows she has yet to play a rated game. I kid you not. Maybe she is the reason the once venerable Chess Life magazine now includes articles such as More Chess Parenting: Nurturing the Talented Child, by Alexey Root, WIM.

Alexey is rated 2000 USCF, meaning she would be a floored National Master if male. I recently reached out to a number of Chess players, asking if they read the article. No one replied in the affirmative. One wag responded, “No one reads that shit, Bacon.” Who knows, maybe a few parents of children involved with Chess actually read the article. Maybe… Another said, “The USCF could care less about people who actually play Chess, Mike. They are attempting to reach PARENTS!”

“It’s a Total Numbers Game”

The above has become the mantra for women involved with Chess. It is also a load of crap. Statistics prove that young girls exposed to Chess stop playing the game around puberty. There is a reason. I do not profess to know the reason, but there must be a reason, because there is always a reason. Unfortunately, the same could be said for preteen boys. Something happens to children of both sexes around puberty and they leave Chess in droves. Why is that? There is a reason, and it would seem those in charge would spend as much of Rex Sinquefield’s money as they could grasp to learn why young people leave the game. Instead, large sums of money go to attracting even more young children to replace the money of those who leave the game, never to return.

Sports Illustrated Features US Chess Women: “It’s a Total Numbers Game.”
By Jennifer Shahade|December 21, 2018|Kids, News, Women

It’s a total and complete numbers game. What the women’s committee is trying to do is to grow the base- Maureen Grimaud

Comments
Edward | December 27, 2018 at 4:29 pm
No matter all the explanation in the world, having separate girls/women chess tournaments sends the message that females can not compete with males in chess.
https://www.si.com/more-sports/2018/12/17/lisa-lane-hou-yifan-womens-chess-gender-inequality-world-championships

Ladies Knight with Maureen Grimaud [PODCAST]
By Jennifer Shahade|August 21, 2019|Ladies Knight, News, Podcast, Women

The August episode of Ladies Knight features Maureen Grimaud,

chair of the US Chess Women’s committee. Maureen is a vocal proponent and supporter of bringing more women and girls into chess, from her work with the girls club’ rooms and Regional women’s events. In a Sports Illustrated article about women in chess, Maureen said, “It’s a numbers game, It’s a total and complete numbers game. What the women’s committee is trying to do is to grow the base.”

Ladies Knight with Maureen Grimaud [PODCAST]

How about Maureen’s numbers? The woman has played a total of 44 rated games since 2006. She won four of the games and drew three. She last played in a USCF rated tournament in 2012. Her rating is 440. How about Rex Sinquefield putting up money for a match between Maureen and the President of the USCF, Allen Priest? Although the Prez outweighs her by about the same number of pounds as he out rates her I would hafta say it’s a toss-up.

I do not have answers to the questions posed in this post; maybe there are no answers, or no one really wants to learn the answers while the money is still flowing into Chess. But how long will it last?

Ouijazilla

World’s Largest Ouija Board to be Unveiled This Weekend

October 11, 2019

By Tim Binnall

An organization dedicated to preserving the history of ‘talking boards’ said to communicate with spirits on the ‘other side’ will unveil what they say is the world’s largest Ouija Board at an event on Saturday. Dubbed ‘Ouijazilla,’ the enormous piece was produced by Rick Schreck, vice president of the Talking Board Historical Society, (https://tbhs.org/) over the course of the last year as his home in New Jersey.
Although the specific dimensions of the giant board have yet to be revealed, the group says that it is “heavier than an elephant, longer than a brontosaurus” and could comfortably fit “five full-size eighteen-wheelers” atop the enormous piece. The massive wooden construction is also said to be two-and-a-half times bigger than the current record holder for the world’s largest Ouija Board, which is on the roof of an allegedly haunted hotel in Pennsylvania.

The monstrous Ouija Board will be revealed to the public on Saturday at an event in, appropriately enough, Salem, Massachusetts, where it will cover the city’s common. And, for those wondering, the huge hand-painted piece is “fully operational” as Schreck also build a corresponding planchette for the device. It’s uncertain as to whether or not the mighty Ouija Board will be used to conjure any spirits on Saturday, but one assumes that, if it is, the ghosts could wind up being pretty sizeable.

https://www.coasttocoastam.com/article/world-s-largest-ouija-board-to-be-unveiled-this-weekend

OUIJAZILLA!

Ouija Board

Chevelle

Produced by Chevelle & Joe Barresi
Album La Gárgola

[Intro]
Are you up for anything?

[Chorus]
We’re growing a fire
Self explore your egoism
Pulling out that ouija board, it’s on

[Verse 1]
Never say die unless you mean it
You’re the salt of the earth left uneasy
Right or wrong if the world explodes
Well you and I are one

[Chorus]
‘Cause we’re growing a fire
Self explore your egoism
Pulling out your Ouija board, oh no

[Verse 2]
How could you show ’em your weakness
Son of a bitch had no reason
Come along here’s a seed of truth
‘Cause you and I are one

[Outro]
‘Cause we’re growing
A fire
‘Cause we’re growing
A fire
‘Cause we’re growing
A fire

https://genius.com/Chevelle-ouija-board-lyrics

New Book on Bobby Fischer in Iceland

New Book on Bobby Fischer in Iceland


Garðar Sverrisson, with his book, now in English translation: Bobby Fisher-The Final Years. Photo/Kristinn Magnusson

The book Bobby Fischer – The Final Years, by Garðar Sverrisson, has just been published by Ugla publishing house, Morgunblaðið reports. The English translation is by María Helga Guðmundsdóttir, but the original Icelandic version, Yfir farinn veg með Bobby Fischer, hit the shelves in 2015.
“I relate a number of things, not revealed elsewhere, regarding his life and attitudes, along with information on how he reacted to a difficult disease in the end,” Garðar states.
The former chess world champion died in 2008. He spent the last three years of his life in Iceland, where he is buried. Garðar and he were in touch almost daily for more than three years and remained close friends the whole time Fischer lived in Iceland.
“My family and I got to know him very well, unlike most people who have written about him and who have had to rely on sources of diverse quality, making many guesses where information is lacking,” Garðar explains.
He decided to write the book after being asked about Fischer numerous times by people who had heard all sorts of rumors about him.
“My family and I hardly knew the Bobby they were talking about,” Garðar continues, referring to the rumors. “That’s when I started jotting down all sorts of notes, which didn’t appear to have been revealed about his life and attitudes. Not just regarding chess and social issues, but also his numerous interests and dramatic life experiences, from growing up in New York to his last years in Iceland.”
Just like many others, Garðar admits he had expected Fischer to be difficult to get along with, but he turned out to be quite a gentle person. He enjoyed being around animals and chatting with young people. He spoke to them on their terms.
“It surprised me, too, how attracted he was to nature, having lived mainly in large cities,” Garðar states.
“He was interested in philosophy, very intelligent and well informed, having read so many books through the years and spent a long time abroad, mainly in central Europe and Asia.”
Garðar’s goal was to present the Bobby he knew and share points others would not be able to relate.
“I’m convinced Bobby would have enjoyed [the book],” he concludes, “although he might have argued about some details.”

https://icelandmonitor.mbl.is/news/culture_and_living/2019/10/05/new_book_on_bobby_fischer_in_iceland/

One More Cup of Joe

Study: Drinking 3 Cups Of Coffee, Tea Daily Can Trigger Migraines

by Ben Renner

BOSTON — For devoted java lovers, just one cup of joe in the morning may not be enough to knock all the cobwebs from their eyes. This often leads to multiple trips to the coffee pot. If this sounds like your typical A.M. routine, you may be putting yourself at greater risk of suffering episodic migraines, according to a new study.

“Based on our study, drinking one or two caffeinated beverages in a day does not appear to be linked to developing a migraine headache, however, three or more servings may be associated with a higher odds of developing a headache,” comments lead investigator Dr. Elizabeth Mostofsky in a release.

https://www.studyfinds.org/study-drinking-3-cups-coffee-tea-daily-can-trigger-migraines/

Does Gata Kamsky Read The AW?

Imagine my surprise upon seeing the Gata Kamsky playing Qe2 versus the French defense in the eight round of the Barcelona Open. First he plays the Leningrad Dutch and then the Chigorin against the French. It is enough to make one wonder if the Gator has been reading the Armchair Warrior…

Gata Kamsky (2685)

vs Salvador G. Del Rio De Angelis (2488)

Barcelona Open 2019 round 08

1 e4 e6 2 Qe2 c5 3 Nf3 (SF plays 3 g3) 3…Nc6 4 g3 (The most often played move but Komodo would play 4 d3. What SF would play is not shown at the CBDB) 4…d6 (SF prefers 4…g6) 5 Bg2 (Although Komodo plays this SF & Houdini choose 5 c3) 5…Nf6 (The most often played move, but SF would play 5…g6; Komodo plays 5…e5) 6 O-O (The most often played move to date but SF would play 6 c3) 6…Be7 (Earlier versions of SF chose this move but SF 10 @ depth 34 plays 6…e5, expecting 7 c3 Be7) 7 c3 (The most often move chosen but SF 10 would play the little played 7 e5) 7…O-O (Although SF 9 shows this move, SF 10 would play the seldom played 7…Qb6, expecting 8 Na3 0-0) 8 Rd1 (The SF move, but Houdini would play the most often played move, 8 d4) 8…b6 (A plethora of moves have been tried in this position. SF 10 would play 8…e5; SF 090519 prefers 8…d5) 9 d4 cxd4 (Komodo plays this move but SF 010719 likes 9…d5, which is not shown at the CBDB) 10 Nxd4 (For 10 cxd4 see Kobalia vs Grachev below) 10…Nxd4 11 cxd4 a5 (For 11…Bb7 see Erdos vs Jianu below) 12. Nc3 Ba6 13. Qe1 Rc8 14. Bg5 Nd7 15. Be3 Qc7 16. a4 Rfe8 17. Rac1 Qb8 18. h3 Bf8 19. Kh2 Nf6 20. f3 Nd7 21. Qf2 Bc4 22. Bf1 Qb7 23. Bxc4 Rxc4 24. d5 Rec8 25. dxe6 fxe6 26. Rd4 Rxd4 27. Bxd4 Nc5 28. Rd1 Qc6 29. Qc2 Nd7 30. Qd3 Qc4 31. Kg2 Qb3 32. Rd2 Rc4 33. f4 Nc5 34. Bxc5 bxc5 35. Rf2 Rxa4 36. f5

Black has played well up to this point and has an extra pawn to show for his effort. What move would you play?

36…Rd4 37. Qf3 e5 38. f6 Qf7 39. Nd5

39…gxf6? (With this move black lets go of the rope…) 40. Nxf6+ Kh8 41. Qg4 Bh6 42. Qc8+ Qf8 43. Qd7 Qg7 44. Qe6 1-0

Mikhail Kobalia (2608) vs Boris Grachev (2621)

73rd Moscow Blitz

09/07/2019

B40 Sicilian defense

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.g3 Nc6 4.Bg2 Nf6 5.Qe2 d6 6.O-O Be7 7.c3 O-O 8.Rd1 b6 9.d4 cxd4 10.cxd4 d5 11.e5 Nd7 12.Nc3 a5 13.a4 Ba6 14.Nb5 Rc8 15.Bd2 Nb4 16.Bc3 Nb8 17.Bf1 N8c6 18.Qd2 Qd7 19.h4 Na7 20.Nxa7 Qxa7 21.Ng5 Bxf1 22.Rxf1 Qa6 23.f4 Qd3 24.Qxd3 Nxd3 25.Rfd1 Nb4 26.Nf3 h5 27.Kf2 g6 28.Ke2 Rc4 29.Nd2 Rc6 30.Nf1 Rfc8 31.Ne3 Kf8 32.Kd2 Ke8 33.Rdc1 Kd7 34.Rd1 R8c7 35.Rdc1 Kc8 36.Nc2 Kb7 37.Bxb4 axb4 38.Ne3 b3 39.Rxc6 Rxc6 40.a5 bxa5 41.Kd3 Kb6 42.Nd1 Bb4 43.Ne3 Kb5 44.Ke2 a4 45.Kd3 Ra6 46.Nd1 Ra7 47.Rc1 Be1 48.Nc3+ Bxc3 49.

Viktor Erdos (2650) vs Vlad Cristian Jianu (2550)

TCh-ROU 2013

B40 Sicilian defense

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. g3 Nc6 4. Bg2 Nf6 5. Qe2 d6 6. O-O Be7 7. c3 b6 8. Rd1 O-O 9. d4 cxd4 10. Nxd4 Nxd4 11. cxd4 Bb7 12. Nc3 Qc7 13. Bf4 Rad8 14. Rac1 Qb8 15. g4 Rfe8 16. g5 Nd7 17. h4 Bf8 18. Bg3 a6 19. d5 exd5 20. Nxd5 Rc8 21. Qd2 b5 22. b3 Rxc1 23. Rxc1 Rc8 24. Rd1 Ne5 25. Kh1 Bxd5 26. exd5 Re8 27. Re1 g6 28. Be4 Qc8 29. Kg2 h6 30. f3 hxg5 31. hxg5 Qd8 32. Bf4 Nd7 33. Bb1 Rxe1 34. Qxe1 Bg7 35. Qd2 Qe7 36. Be3 1/2-1/2

So this is how it ends
And no, it’s not fair
They say life goes on
But I’m not sure where
Move forward, forget
Just doesn’t feel right
If I’m still losing sleep
Every night

But I’ll make myself believe
That I’m not a coward
When it’s all I’ll ever be

But here I am
Burning at both ends
Playing the victim
When I know I’ll never win
I’ll never win
And I can’t get out
Of my own head
So tell me

How to make myself believe
That I’m not a coward
When it’s all I’ll ever be
Tonight I’m laying myself down
While I’m still bleeding out

This ends now

Gata Kamsky Plays Both Sides of the Leningrad Dutch

Gata Kamsky (2685)

vs Jules Moussard (2608)

Barcelona Open 2019
round 04

1 d4 f5 2 g3 Nf6 3 Bg2 d6 4 Nf3 g6 5 O-O Bg7 6 b3 (Although Houdini plays this move Komodo and SF play 6 c4) 6…O-O (The most often played move but would play the little played 6…a5, expecting 7 c4 a4) 7 Bb2 c6 (7…Qe8 has been played a few more times than 7…c6, but SF 250819 at depth 49 plays 7…Ne4, expecting 8 Nbd2 c6. SF 10 @ depth 48 prefers the seldom played 7…e6, expecting 8 c4 Nc6) 8 c4 (SF 9 @ depth 42 plays 8 Nbd2) 8…a5 (SF 120119 @ depth 37 plays the most often played move, 8…Na6, but SF 10 @ depth 37 would play 8…Re8, a move not shown at the ChessBaseDataBase) 9 a3 (Both SF & Komodo play 9 Nc3) 9…Ne4 (This is a TN. Komodo plays Na6, the most often played move in the position. Houdini would play the new move played in the game, 9…Ne4, expecting 10 Nbd2 d5) 10. Nbd2 Nxd2 11. Qxd2 Nd7 12. Rfd1 Nf6 13. Qc2 Ne4 14. Ne1 Qe8 15. d5 Bxb2 16. Qxb2 g5 17. Qd4 Qg6 18. Rac1 c5 19. Qe3 Rf7 20. Nd3 Bd7 21. f3 Nf6 22. f4 h6 23. b4 axb4 24. axb4 b6 25. Ra1 Rxa1 26. Rxa1 Ng4 27. Qc1 Qf6 28. e3 gxf4

Reaching a critical position. What would you play as white?

29. gxf4? (According to the ChessBomb this is a dreaded BRIGHT RED MOVE. If this was your move you need to contemplate longer) Qh4 30. h3 Nf6 31. Qe1 Qh5 32. Ra8+ Kh7 33. bxc5 bxc5 34. Kh2 Rg7 35. Ra7 Bc8 36. Nc1 Ne4 37. Ne2 Qg6 38. Bf3 Qf6 39. Ra8 Bb7 40. Ra7 Bc8 41. Ra8 Bd7 42. Ra7 e6 43. dxe6 Qxe6 44. Qc1 Qf6 45. Bxe4 fxe4 46. Qf1 Qb2 47. f5 Qe5+ 48. Qf4 Qxf5 49. Qxf5+ Bxf5 50. Ra6 Be6 51. Rxd6 Bxc4 52. Ng3 Bd3 53. Rc6 Rg5 54. h4 Re5

55. h5? (ChessBomb shows this as a RED MOVE, but not as RED as the earlier RED MOVE, so we will call this one a BLOOD RED MOVE, because the Gator, as Gata is known in the Southern part of the USA, just caused a SELF INFLICTED WOUND)

c4 56. Kh3 Rg5 57. Kh4 Kg7 58. Rc7+ Kh8 59. Rc6 Kh7 60. Rc7+ Rg7? (Yet another BLEEDING MOVE. 60 Kg8 keeps the advantage. Now the game is even, according to the ChessBomb) 61. Rc6 (61 Rc5. Again black has an advantage) 61…Rf7 (61…Rg5 retains the advantage) 62. Kg4 Rf2 63. Rc7+ Kg8 64. Rc6 Kf7 65. Rxh6 c3 66. Rc6 c2 67. Rc7+ Kg8 68. h6 Rg2 69. Kf4 Rg1 70. Nh5 (Rc8+ is equal) 70…c1=Q (70…Rf1+ is strong) 71. Nf6+ Kf8 72. Nh7+ Ke8 73. Nf6+ Kd8 74. Rxc1 Rxc1 75. h7 Rh1 76. Kg5 Be2 77. Kg6 Ke7 78. Ng8+ Kf8 79. Nh6 Rg1+ 80. Kf6 Rf1+ 81. Kg6 Bh5+ 82. Kxh5 Kg7 83. h8=Q+ Kxh8 84. Kg6 Rg1+ 85. Kf5 Kg7 86. Ng4 Rg2 87. Ne5 Rg3 88. Kxe4 Rxe3+ ½-½

Adolfo Diaz Nunez (2145) vs Francisco Vallejo Pons (2415)

Mondariz op

A04 Reti opening

1.Nf3 g6 2.g3 Bg7 3.d4 f5 4.Bg2 Nf6 5.O-O O-O 6.b3 d6 7.Bb2 a5 8.a3 c6 9.c4 e5 10.dxe5 Ng4 11.Qc2 Nxe5 12.Nbd2 Na6 13.Rad1 Qe7 14.Bc3 Nc7 15.Qb2 Re8 16.Rfe1 Bd7 17.Nxe5 dxe5 18.e4 f4 19.gxf4 Ne6 20.Bxe5 Nxf4 21.Nf3 Bxe5 22.Rxd7 Bxb2 23.Rxe7 Rxe7 24.a4 Rd8 25.h4 Rd3 0-1

Elina Danielian (2476) vs Viktorija Cmilyte (2524)

SportAccord Blitz Women 2012

Beijing CHN 2012

A04 Reti opening

1.Nf3 g6 2.d4 f5 3.g3 Nf6 4.Bg2 Bg7 5.O-O O-O 6.b3 d6 7.Bb2 c6 8.c4 a5 9.a3 Qc7 10.Nbd2 Re8 11.Qc2 e5 12.c5 e4 13.cxd6 Qxd6 14.Ne5 Be6 15.Ndc4 Qc7 16.b4 axb4 17.axb4 Na6 18.Ba3 Nd5 19.Qd2 Bf8 20.Rfb1 Red8 21.b5 cxb5 22.Rxb5 Bxa3 23.Rxa3 Ne7 24.Qb2 Rab8 25.Rc3 Rxd4 26.Ne3 Qd8 27.h4 b6 28.Ra3 Nc5 29.Ra7 Qd6 30.Rxe7 Qxe5 31.Rxe6 Qg7 32.Rexb6 Rc8 33.Rb8 Rdd8 34.Qxg7+ Kxg7 35.Rxc8 Rxc8 36.Rb1 Ne6 37.Nd5 Nd4 38.e3 Ne6 39.Bf1 Rc2 40.Nf4 Nc5 41.Ra1 Nb3 42.Ra7+ Kf6 43.Ra6+ Kg7 44.Rb6 Nd2 45.Rb7+ Kf6 46.Rd7 Nf3+ 47.Kg2 Ne1+ 48.Kg1 Nf3+ 49.Kh1 Rxf2 50.Bg2 Ra2 51.Bxf3 exf3 52.Rd1 Ra3 53.Re1 Ke5 54.Kg1 Ra2 55.Rf1 Ke4 56.Re1 f2+ 57.Kf1 fxe1=Q+ 0-1

Alexander Donchenko (2631)

vs Gata Kamsky (2685)

Barcelona Open 2019 round 05

1. Nf3 f5 2. g3 Nf6 3. Bg2 g6 4. c4 Bg7 5. Nc3 d6 6. d4 O-O 7. O-O c6 8. d5 e5 9. dxe6 Bxe6 10. b3 Na6 11. Ng5 Bc8 12. Bb2 h6 13. Nf3 Be6 14. Nd4 Bf7 15. Qc2 Nc5 (15…Nb4! A FORCING MOVE!) 16. Rad1 Qb6 17. e3 a5 18. Nde2 Rfd8 (18…a4 would seem to be the logical rejoinder) 19. Ba3 Qc7 20. Bxc5 dxc5 21. Rxd8+ Rxd8 22. Rd1 Rd6 23. h3 Qd8 24. Rxd6 Qxd6 25. Kf1 ½-½

1 Nf3 f5 2 g3 Nf6 (SF & Komodo both prefer 2…g6) 3 Bg2 g6 4 c4 Bg7 5 Nc3 (SF plays 5 d4; Komodo 5 0-0) 5…d6 (Komodo plays this move but SF would castle) 6 d4 O-O 7 O-O c6 (7…Qe8 was the move of choice by GM Vladimir Malaniuk and is analyzed extensively in his book. At one time or another I attempted the Malaniuk move, and the game move, but settled on 7…Nc6. All of the top programs show 7…c6 as best) 8 d5 (SF 10 @ depth 53 would play 8 Rb1; SF 110719 @ depth 48 prefers 8 b3) 8…e5 9 dxe6 Bxe6 10 b3 Na6 11 Ng5 Bc8 (SF 9 @ depth 28 plays 11…Qe7 expecting 12 Nxe6 Qxe6; Komodo 12 @ depth 26 would play 11…Nc5 showing 12 Bb2 Qe7 to follow) 12 Bb2 (SF says 12 Rb1) 12…h6 13 Nf3 Be6 14 Nd4 (SF 010719 @ depth considers 14 Qc2 superior. The CBDB does not show the game move, but one game with the move was found at 365Chess.com:

Armin Kranz (2145) vs Christoph Renner (2425)
Schwarzach op-A 1999

A88 Dutch, Leningrad, main variation with c6

1.d4 f5 2.c4 Nf6 3.Nc3 d6 4.Nf3 g6 5.g3 Bg7 6.Bg2 O-O 7.O-O c6 8.d5 e5 9.dxe6 Bxe6 10.b3 Na6 11.Ng5 Bc8 12.Bb2 h6 13.Nf3 Be6 14.Nd4 Bf7 15.e3 Re8 16.Qc2 d5 17.cxd5 Nb4 18.Qd2 Nbxd5 19.Nde2 Qe7 20.Nxd5 Nxd5 21.Bxg7 Kxg7 22.Qd4+ Qf6 23.Rad1 Red8 24.Rd2 Nc3 25.Qxf6+ Kxf6 26.Rc2 Nxe2+ 27.Rxe2 a5 28.Rb1 Rd7 29.e4 fxe4 30.Bxe4 Re8 31.Rbe1 Rd4 32.f3 a4 33.bxa4 Rxa4 34.Rb1 Re7 35.Rbb2 Rd7 36.Kf2 Ra3 37.Rec2 Ke7 38.Re2 Kd8 39.f4 Ra5 40.g4 Re7 41.Rb4 g5 42.Rd2+ Kc7 43.a4 gxf4 44.Kf3 Be6 45.Kxf4 Rf7+ 46.Kg3 Rf1 47.Rdb2 Ra7 48.h4 Ra1 49.g5 hxg5 50.hxg5 R1xa4 51.g6 b5 52.Kf4 Rxb4 53.Rxb4 Kd6 54.Rd4+ Kc5 55.Rd8 b4 56.Ke5 Bd5 57.Kf6 b3 58.Rb8 Ra1 59.g7 Rg1 60.Bh7 Rg2 61.g8=Q Bxg8 62.Bxg8 Rxg8 63.Rxg8 Kc4 64.Ke5 b2 65.Rb8 Kc3 ½-½

Trump’s foul mood leads him deeper into darkness

Trump’s foul mood leads him deeper into darkness

Analysis by Stephen Collinson, CNN

Updated 10:04 AM ET, Thu October 3, 2019

Washington (CNN)

President Donald Trump is hardly acting like a very stable genius.
Instead, his unleashed fury, fact-bending rants and persecution complex are conjuring an image of someone seeing his presidency slipping through his hands. While current political conditions seem unlikely to lead to his ouster from office, Trump appears increasingly powerless to save himself from the historical scar of impeachment.
He has crushed just about every norm since descending his golden escalator to launch his 2016 presidential campaign. Now he’s reinventing how presidents deal with an existential scandal. And it seems to be leading him deeper into the darkness.
Part of Trump’s frustration may stem from the unusual nature of his current plight. Since taking office, Trump has kept Washington hopping, with his adversaries never knowing what wild gyration will rock the capital next. But in the week since House Speaker Nancy Pelosi formally initiated impeachment hearings, the President has seemed out of sorts. It is the Democrats who are doing all the running, and Trump can’t catch up.
https://www.cnn.com/2019/10/03/politics/donald-trump-impeachment-inquiry/index.html

Slippin’ into Darkness

War

Produced by Chris Huston & Jerry Goldstein

Album: All Day Music

Slippin’ into Darkness

I was slippin’ into darkness
When they took my friend away
I was slippin’ into darkness
When they took, when they took my friend away

You know he loves to drink good whiskey
While Laughing at the moon

Slippin’ into darkness
Take my mind beyond the dreams
I was slippin’ into darkness
Take my mind beyond the dreams

Where I talk to my brother
Who never said their name

Slippin’ into darkness
All my trouble so I choose
I was slippin’ into darkness
All my trouble so I choose

I got a wife and a baby
Now my love hath gained its fame

Slippin’ into darkness
When I heard my mother say
I was slippin’ into darkness
When I heard my mother say
You’ve been slippin’ into darkness

Pretty soon you gonna pay

https://genius.com/War-slippin-into-darkness-lyrics